Know the code ?!?
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wojo
January 13, 2009
Member since 01/17/2005 🔗
306 posts
Getting ready for Scout Snow Sports Merit Badge and one of the requriements is to "Tell the meaning of the Your Responsibility Code for skiers and snow-boarders." Soo . . . using google and the net I set out to confirm my knowledge of the 10 points (or so I though/remembered) of the code. Everyone uses the same words below (ski patrol, NSAA, PSIA) and it all ends in "This is a partial list." What happened to the full list and does anyone remember it?

*************The Code*************
Skiing and snowboarding can be enjoyed in many ways. At ski areas you may see people using alpine, snowboard, telemark, cross country and other specialized ski equipment, such as that used by disabled or other skiers. Regardless of how you decide to enjoy the slopes, always show courtesy to others and be aware that there are elements of risk in skiing that common sense and personal awareness can help reduce. Observe the code listed below and share with other skiers the responsibility for a great skiing experience.

Always stay in control.
People ahead of you have the right of way.
Stop in a safe place for you and others.
Whenever starting downhill or merging, look uphill and yield.
Use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.
Observe signs and warnings, and keep off closed trails.
Know how to use the lifts safely.
Be safety conscious and
KNOW THE CODE. IT'S YOUR RESPONSIBILITY.

This is a partial list.
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Jim
January 13, 2009
Member since 11/22/1999 🔗
317 posts
Wojo - since I started skiing about 30+ years ago, I've always seen the list you posted (or some version thereof) as the full code. I believe the "partial" list disclaimer is intended to demonstrate that the rules are not exhaustive. Courtesy and common sense also play in. It would be hard for an area to enforce safe skiing if the only rules were on the "Official" Responsibility Code. Accordingly, I believe the "partial" portion allows flexibility for areas to customize or just plain enforce common sense!
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
January 13, 2009
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
Totally agree, but considering the vitriol on this site expressed towards some of the tenets of the code, particularly on respecting signs and keeping off closed trails, I am not too hopeful that consciousness raising works all too well. As time goes by, I've been switching to draconic enforcement and trespassing arrests by ski operators.
wojo
January 13, 2009
Member since 01/17/2005 🔗
306 posts
I just find it funny that they emphasize KNOWING THE CODE and then only telling you part of it :-)
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jimmy
January 13, 2009
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
2,650 posts
I counted the safety code points on Timberline's trail map last weekend. They only list the first seven. What would you add to those??

Personally, I'd like to see one on proper attire. My safety and overall ski experience would be enhanced if the other skiers would be more consious of color co-ordination of their equipments and clothing.
kwillg6
January 13, 2009
Member since 01/18/2005 🔗
2,022 posts
Originally Posted By: jimmy


Personally, I'd like to see one on proper attire. My safety and overall ski experience would be enhanced if the other skiers would be more consious of color co-ordination of their equipments and clothing.


sick cry sick cry sick
David
January 13, 2009
Member since 06/28/2004 🔗
2,444 posts
Originally Posted By: jimmy
My safety and overall ski experience would be enhanced if the other skiers would be more consious of color co-ordination of their equipments and clothing.



Yeah, but that would create a problem here in WV because I have never heard of skis/boots that came with a camo or Carhartt design pattern.... smile
Fleetwood
January 13, 2009
Member since 12/6/2008 🔗
69 posts
Originally Posted By: David
Yeah, but that would create a problem here in WV because I have never heard of skis/boots that came with a camo or Carhartt design pattern.... smile


Ahhh, no so fast. Here are your camo skis: http://www.skihide.com/ski/camo

And if you pick "Camo 9", you can get these boots to match: http://www.skis.com/product/143967?source=googleps
David
January 13, 2009
Member since 06/28/2004 🔗
2,444 posts
Nice find... Although that is your more traditional Army style camo. Here in good Ole WV you're more likely to find stuff like this:





and these are even seen a good bit:

gizmosnow
January 13, 2009
Member since 10/6/2005 🔗
269 posts
Wojo;

To get back on point, The Responsibility Code, at least in N. America, does consist exactly of the seven items you listed (the last item about being safety conscious and knowing the code is NOT actually part of the code). However, I have seen it written out somewhat more detailed --- your version is actually about the most succinct I recall seeing. (E.G., for #3 - ..."stop in safe place...", I've seen versions that add '...do not stop in middle of trail or where can't be seen from above...').

Also, I vaguely recall seeing in a mag somewhere that Responsiblitly code in Europe had a few additional items.
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
January 13, 2009
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
Originally Posted By: jimmy
Personally, I'd like to see one on proper attire. My safety and overall ski experience would be enhanced if the other skiers would be more consious of color co-ordination of their equipments and clothing.


This would require a totally separate code... For example:

Skiers will board high-speed quads in the following order of priority:
a. Skiers wearing Bogner, Prada, Patagucci, Chanel, Versace or Spyder have head of the line
b. North Face or REI have to wait second
c. Columbia wearers board third
d. Jean-clad skiers are restricted to rope tows

Wearing green or neon with anything is cause for Ski Patrol to clip your ticket. No warnings.

Skiers wearing Rasta-dread hats are required to hike up the mountain

Anyone wearing Snowjoggers outside the immediate ski area will be forced to eat them

Ugg boots or Crocs are not allowed in any ski area under penalty of strangulation
The Colonel - DCSki Supporter
January 13, 2009
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
3,098 posts
jimmy,
I remember a visit to Vail some years ago and seeing a skiing woman wearing a white Bogner suite, with a whit cap, white skis, white poles, white boots, etc. You get the point. She thought she was ulta stylish, except that on the slopes in the falling snow she was a stealth kamikaze. From behind she was invisible, a major danger to herself and those around her.
How did I notice her you ask? Well, she was a very pretty blonde.
The Colonel smile
Clay
January 14, 2009
Member since 04/11/2006 🔗
555 posts
Originally Posted By: lbotta
Wearing green or neon with anything is cause for Ski Patrol to clip your ticket. No warnings.


See Kwillg6? It's not just me! sick
kwillg6
January 14, 2009
Member since 01/18/2005 🔗
2,022 posts

Aw, man! Give a guy a break! cry I can't help it if the boot that fits me like a dream has that ugly, neon, puke green shell. sick Would it help if I told you that Glen Plake designed them????? blush
David
January 14, 2009
Member since 06/28/2004 🔗
2,444 posts
Lou, what about people wearing a neon green "fartbag"?? What is to be done with them??

Clay
January 14, 2009
Member since 04/11/2006 🔗
555 posts
Originally Posted By: kwillg6
Would it help if I told you that Glen Plake designed them????? blush


No.
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
January 14, 2009
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
Oh Lord... Unspeakabe wardrobe faux pas... The Fashion Police has already issued warrants for their arrest

Originally Posted By: David
Lou, what about people wearing a neon green "fartbag"?? What is to be done with them??

pagamony - DCSki Supporter
January 14, 2009
Member since 02/23/2005 🔗
832 posts
Are you kidding me? That is individuality to be celebrated even if not revered. And check out the boots and skis - contemporaries of the outfit! That's as good as it gets.

Now the rasta hat, that is a different matter - capital offense.


I need to find a good old pair of Kastle skis and Soli 737 bindings, that's the bomb. too bad my old boots fell apart.
JohnL
January 14, 2009
Member since 01/6/2000 🔗
3,514 posts
I don't much mind the outfit, but the rear entry boots and skis have to go.

David, the West Virginia orange hunting set-up is not too practical; ski patrol will easily spot you if you're poaching the woods or trails!
skier219
January 14, 2009
Member since 01/8/2005 🔗
1,318 posts
I happen to have a pair of neon-yellow Kastles in my garage, 195cm.
jimmy
January 14, 2009
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
2,650 posts
Originally Posted By: JohnL

David, the West Virginia orange hunting set-up is not too practical; ski patrol will easily spot you if you're poaching the woods or trails!


Ya but the tree skiing set up he posted is da bomb
fishnski
January 14, 2009
Member since 03/27/2005 🔗
3,530 posts
Staying at the Jordan up at Sunday river Maine I amused the doorman when I walked in with my Camo's on!
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
January 14, 2009
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
This is the European code pronounced by the FIS.

1. Consideration of the other Skiers: Every skier has to behave in a way he or she doesn't endanger or damage any other.
2. Controlling of speed and way of skiing: Every skier has to ski on sight. He has to adapt his speed and way of skiing to his abilities and the conditions of the terrain, the snow and the weather as to the traffic density.
3. Choice of track: The skier coming from behind another has to choose his track so that skiers before him won't be endangered.
4. Overtaking: Overtaking is allowed from above or below, from right or left but always with a distance so that the skier being overtaken has space enough for all his movements.
5. Entering and restarting: Every skier entering a trail or starting after a halt has to asure himself uphill and downhill of the fact that he can do so without danger for himself and others.
6. Stopping: Every skier has to avoid stopping at small or blind places of a trail without need. A fallen skier has to free such a place as quick as possible.
7. Mounting and descend: A skier mounting or descending by feet has to use the border of the trail.
8. Pay attention to signs: Every skier has to pay attention to the marks and signs.
9. Behavior in case of accidents: In case of accidents every skier has to help.
10. Duty of proving identity: Every skier whether witness or involved, whether responsible or not has to prove his identity in case of an accident.
The Colonel - DCSki Supporter
January 14, 2009
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
3,098 posts
Lou,
Like the European version of the skiers code. But what does "ski on sight" mean in #2? Or is it a typo and mean on the right, and, if so, why? It is not like there is two way traffic on the slope.
Look forward to meeting you in person this weekend.
The Colonel smile
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
January 14, 2009
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
On sight - I conjecture - probably a bad translation from the original French. It means skiing according to the conditions, same as it continues on the same paragraph. You schuss on uncrowded slopes and with good visibility and you ski slowly on crowded areas or with poor visibility. This means also keeping speed slower on or near dropoffs or blind corners where sight of others is compromised.

Really, it is common sense...
pagamony - DCSki Supporter
January 14, 2009
Member since 02/23/2005 🔗
832 posts
Originally Posted By: fishnski
Staying at the Jordan up at Sunday river Maine I amused the doorman when I walked in with my Camo's on!


now see, if you had gone on up to Saddleback, you would have fit in just fine. you could even swap between snowmachine and ski slope. wth were you doing at sunday river anyway ?
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