Alpine Trekker
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4 users
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SCWVA
November 4, 2004
Member since 07/13/2004 🔗
1,051 posts
Has anyone used or know where I might find some write ups on the Alpine Trekker by Backcountry Access?
PhysicsMan
November 4, 2004
Member since 11/20/2001 🔗
218 posts
Quote:

Has anyone used or know where I might find some write ups on the Alpine Trekker by Backcountry Access?




http://www.telemarktalk.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=7820&highlight=trekker

For more discussion, do a search on "trekker" in the discussion forums of:

www.telemarktips.com,

and to a lesser extent,
http://tetongravity.com/forums/ and
www.epicski.com

HTH,

Tom / PM
Crush
November 4, 2004
Member since 03/21/2004 🔗
1,021 posts
Ya .... read the posts .. and I have/do use them. The posts that PhysicsMan pointed to are pretty honest.Trekkers will never be as light as a free-heel or Fritschi binding, but it does allow you to use regular alpine bingings ... which I view as a *plus* becuase I don't ski like a backcountry guy. I like a binding that is precise and tight. I don't spend my days plesantly skinning up rolling hills, taking a lunch break and then telemarking down. If you like this kind of skiing go with Fritschi binding they are nearly as good as Alpine ones when you go downhill. Alpine Trekkers are hard to work and are very, very high (you will find that your foot tends to flop over to the side sometimes if you misstep) but let me put it this way....

In March 2003 I went B/C with a guide from the Univ. of Utah and two other guys plus a snowboarder with a split board. We all wore ourselves out for 6 hours going up what is called "USA Bowl" across from Solitude Mt. Resort. I was totally beat but when we were on top we had to ski down at about 3:00 PM. The conditions were heavy, wet, tracky mush. I had Alpine Trekkers on K2 Launchers (very short only 165 CM). The guide went first in his tele gear and took 20 minutes to go down kick-turning half of all turns. The snowboarder went second and made huge turns going 40+ MPH. I went next and made barely-in-control super-G turns once I ripped off my trekkers and clicked into my Markers. The other two guys in tele gear either snowplowed and crashed or did stop-kickturn-go-stop runs. ....

And once we got to the tree-line we had to ski trees and I was slaloming them while everyone else (except the snowboarder) was bogged down or crashing.


I think you get the idea...
SCWVA
November 8, 2004
Member since 07/13/2004 🔗
1,051 posts
Crush & Physicsman thanks for the info. I don't plan on doing any multi day trips on these things. I just want to go uphill to get to some freshies. Have you ever used them on the East Coast? I wonder if Chip at WG would have a problem with using them at his place?
Denis - DCSki Supporter
November 8, 2004
Member since 07/12/2004 🔗
2,221 posts
I'm sure that Chip would have no problem. Can't guarantee that he wouldn't laugh at you.

I've seen AT gear used at WG but not trekkers. I haven't used them but have looked them over in a shop. I'd recommend renting and trying for yourself. Do the same for a true AT set up. The only place I know in the east where you can do this is Climb High in South Burlington, VT. Elsewhere you can rent at Neptune Mountaineering in Boulder and Mammoth Mountaineering in Mammoth Lakes. The Trekker is a clever idea and a good way to rent, get your feet wet and find out if you are going to like this kind of activity. However as a purchase I'm just not sure. They are clunky. Try before you buy.

Edited to add that big alpine boots are as big a liability as the Trekkers themselves. AT boots are much lighter, more comfortable and a pleasure to use in touring. Alpine boots, especially high performance boots are not pleasant in touring. The gear is a compromise of course; give up some control, gain much mobility and freedom. A bumper sticker from the early days of the Telemark revival comes to mind, "minimum equipment, maximum man". (apologies to the ladies, but that's what it said.)

Further edited to say that I took a fixed heel friend in the backcountry last year with just his regular alpine setup and a pair of my old Voile Snakeskins. (If you think the purists are rabid when they talk about Trekkers, just ask them about Snakeskins. ) I recommended that he open his top 2 buckles and loosen the others and go straight up. The slope was relatively mild and short and zig zagging was not needed. This worked quite well. His stride length was limited to a little less than mine with tele gear, but not too much.
Crush
November 8, 2004
Member since 03/21/2004 🔗
1,021 posts
Cool ... don't forget the climbing skins! Actually they make a big difference ... and also get the de-icing spray stuff too or else you will have this big clod of snow underneath you foot as you skin up! LOL enjoy!
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