Where are all the Family Discussions?
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Bodyflight.net
February 19, 2008
Member since 02/19/2008 🔗
28 posts
I know I'm new here, and don't know the ins & outs, but where are all the family discussions? Has this forum been abandoned? Or did it never get off to a good start?
David
February 19, 2008
Member since 06/28/2004 🔗
2,444 posts
 Originally Posted By: Bodyflight.net
Has this forum been abandoned? Or did it never get off to a good start?


Never got off to a start.....
jimmy
February 19, 2008
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
2,650 posts
yeah it's clear down here below hiking biking and camping.... u got kids??
Murphy
February 19, 2008
Member since 09/13/2004 🔗
618 posts
I didn't even know this forum existed. I don't know how other use DCSki but I just look at the new posts on the front page and never notice which forum they come from. Of course that's easier when you check it once an hour .

As far as family issues go, I just took my 6 year old daughter skiing for only her second time. We hit Winterplace President's Day afternoon. Couldn't have asked for better conditions. Temps were hovering around freezing, the morning rain had switched to flurries, the snow was soft but not too wet and crowds were practically non-existent. And big Kudos to Winterplace when it comes to providing a place for really young kids to learn. They have 2 magic carpets serving a gentle slope and 90 minute group lessons for $15! Young can't hardly get a babysitter for that rate. To top it all of the group consisted of my daughter, her friend and one other kid. The instructor may have only been a few years older than my daughter but he was really good with the kids.
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Bodyflight.net
February 19, 2008
Member since 02/19/2008 🔗
28 posts
Well, I do have a lovely 13 year old daughter who is learning to ski. We've taken her in the past on a few select occassions, once a year or so, just to stay familiar with the concept. Last year we headed out to Killington, and it was less than successful a trip for us. So we committed to getting her skiing this year on the home front to get prepared for an out west trip next year.

So far so good!

I have a client that runs a ski school in Gatlinburg, TN so we got her outfitted with skis & boots this year and some warm pants.She's been to Wolf Ridge with us a couple of times, we took her for two days at Winterplace and she's really doing well. She was comfortable enough to get down the snowbowl but that's as far as she wanted to push on that trip. Still impressive for so few times. She was a trooper, and IMO was really starting to show some flair.

We're stealing her away on Thursday after school for a suprise 2 day trip to the "shoe". Can't wait!
SCWVA
February 20, 2008
Member since 07/13/2004 🔗
1,051 posts
Bodyflight,

Welcome to DCSKI.

Sign your daughter up for ski school at Silvercreek while you're at the Shoe. IMHO, I think Silvercreek has better terrain for intermediates. Plus if you sign her up for a group lesson on Friday, she might get a private/semi-private lesson. Stay away from SS's ski school on weekends. It's a mad house, head to Silvercreek.
kwillg6
February 20, 2008
Member since 01/18/2005 🔗
2,034 posts
Ditto on SCWVA's suggestion. I recommend skiing at the creek on Saturday as well. Smaller crowds, and less hassle. Use the shuttle too.
David
February 20, 2008
Member since 06/28/2004 🔗
2,444 posts
Definitely use the shuttle. It has always been nice to leave the car parked and not worry about getting in and out with skis, bunches of clothes, and other equipment. Plus the shuttle gets you a lot closer to where to need to be to go right out and start skiing. Some of the parking lots are a decent walk to the slopes.
Bodyflight.net
February 20, 2008
Member since 02/19/2008 🔗
28 posts
Really? Sign her up for ski school?

Having never taken ski school myself... I wonder...what's the benefit?

We are very much DIY'ers, and from what I'v seen... ski school as opposed to private lessons, seems more like day care/babysitting.
k_alice
February 20, 2008
Member since 11/22/2005 🔗
92 posts
I think there are a lot of family-oriented discussions on DCSki, even if not posted under that specific category. I have two enthusiastic young skiers, ages 9 and 11, and I think one of the best parts about skiing is that it's one of the best family sports.

With regard to ski lessons, a great instructor can make a big difference in one's skiing development, if it comes at the right time. My kids are both on ski teams now, so they get plenty of coaching, but they've taken lessons in the past. Besides the fact that they've had a ton of fun, the instructors know how to analyze their skiing much better than I could ever dream of doing, and can pinpoint issues that enable the kids to make great progress. For my own part, I did a women's ski clinic at Wintergreen in 2007, which was fabulous - when I ski now, I still try to think about the specific issues they told me to focus on. I'm not a great skier (although quite enthusiastic) but that really helped me to learn what I need to do to improve.
kwillg6
February 20, 2008
Member since 01/18/2005 🔗
2,034 posts
With the age of your daughter you may want to ask if they have any classes specific to her age. They used to do that at the shoe, but that was in ancient times when I instructed there. Reason for a lesson? A person learns more, faster, and with the new ski technology, that learning curve is a lot steeper. I don't know what level she would be considered, but if she can make intermediate turns, a group lesson on a weekday afternoon (friday or monday) can ending up being a semi-private or private. I still take lessons. I go in and ask for a level 9/10 group and always get a private with one of the best instructors on the mountain. It helps me tweak some of those annoying bad habits I've developed over the years.
Elrah
February 20, 2008
Member since 10/18/2005 🔗
29 posts
I'm glad I checked in today! Great discussion! I have four kids, all of whom are skiing now, ranging from 16 and 14 to 9 and 4. We're about to go to Snowshoe for a week of fun. This year, we're staying off the Mountain for the first time.

I also have a 14 year old cousin who's flying in from Texas to stay with us and learn to ski!!!! I'm hoping to take him to Winterplace at least once before heading up to Snowshoe--I'm picking up his skis today--and can't WAIT!!! (my son wants me to mention that all but the youngest are 'black diamond skiers') lol My cousin is in for the best of the best--we're going to teach him HOW to ski--and then he's heading out for a week with my little brother who lives in Denver for a week of skiing in the Rockies!!! I'm looking forward to seeing some video of THAT too!

I too would recommend lessons--but especially for parents who are either impatient (only you know if you are) OR for the parents of children who won't or can't receive instruction from them (again, only you know your kids) I've never had any problems teaching my kids--but they also really liked learning with other kids too--and I have friends who have two sons, one of whom is more than perfectly willing to behave like a total baby on the slopes--if his Mom or Dad is around, he'll throw a hissy fit and practically demand to be CARRIED back to a lodge (and this kid is almost 11 years old now) On the other hand, he behaved like an angel for the Staff at Snowshoe...never gave them a moment's grief.
Bodyflight.net
February 20, 2008
Member since 02/19/2008 🔗
28 posts
Hi Everone! I think my very first thread became a hot topic! How cool is that. Fantastic information so far.

We have had a couple of impatient moments for sure when we really started expecting her to actually ski, but we adopted a new attitude about skiing with her. and that's just it.. we're going skiing with HER.. as opposed to she's going skiing with US (if that makes sense to anyone). Once we adopted the new approach, it really made it so much better mentally for everyone. Now, I also give her alot of respect, as I would another friend on the slope; which makes it nearly impossible for us to lapse into any bickering mom/daughter roles. When we want to go do our thing, we do and she enjoys a break in fantastic accommodations or at the base with a cup of cocoa. She gets to watch and she enjoys it. We're very close.

Just last week, she got to watch me take a plunge off of Drop Off from the deck of the Mountainhouse at WP. There I was, feeling good about learning to ski with poles (yes I have just started using poles) AND skiing down an intimidating run for me.. there I was, styling.. a little grace even, when I skiied over my right pole and I went flying to the right and dropped/slammed into the slope. I didn't slide, I thudded. Fortunately my bodyflight training has me programmed to tuck & roll so my arms were in, legs together and I didn't even lose a ski. However I did have to side step it up the slope a long 30 feet to retrieve a lost ski pole. It was great and even though she can't ski drop off yet, she was still there to see it. Love winterplace for the family.. great setup!

We have a few close friends, both ski & snowboard instructors, plus hubby was a pro-patroller for a decade or so (he also worked as a snowmaker for almost equally as long), plus one of my biz clients runs a ski school, so there is plenty of availability for further eduction for us. I must admit, we are fortunate for sure! I think next year, we WILL get a couple of lessons in here before headed out west, where I expect to at least have to take a powder ski lesson at least once. Plus we're gonna throw on some boards as a family and see how it goes just for fun. Can't wait.
kennedy
February 20, 2008
Member since 12/8/2001 🔗
792 posts
I don't have kids so I can't comment there but I'm going to guess that the same rule applies to teaching your kids, especially as they get older, as applies to teaching your significant other. It only works so far. Having a unbiased third party teach sometimes produces better results in a shorter time. I've been riding more than 10 years and consider myself pretty advanced but I still recognize that beyond teaching someone the basics I don't have the tools to teach them intermediate to advanced techniques. These are best shown by someone who understands how to break them down into components that can be better assimilated by the student.

As you mentioned in the post you've found that you've received a better reception once you changed your attitude from her skiing with you to the opposite. Thats fantastic but I imagine there also has to be an attitude shift, I know tough in a 13 year girl right, on her end to be receptive to what you're trying to teach and that can be more difficult but it is less of an issue with an instructor. The nice thing about lessons too is that she gets the opportunity to ski with people of her level so she can have a better gauge of her personal progress. It's hard to feel like you're getting better if the people you ski with most are lightyears ahead of you. While skiing with someone better often makes you better it really depends on how great that gap is. Riding with someone a just little more advanced means you'll catch up quicker and start pushing each other.
GRK
February 20, 2008
Member since 12/19/2007 🔗
404 posts
Hi Bodyflight...can only echo what the others have said about lessons...mid-week group lessons can be almost like privates.

I have an 11 year old in her second year of skiing...she has had 2 group lessons and a private. For the group lessons there were only 4 or 5 people to each instructor because it was mid-week. For the private they matched her up with a college aged girl and that worked really well...they had a lot of fun together. BTW we started skiing at the same time so I have very little experience as well...my daughter is actually a much better skier than I am.

As for the attitude...if I am close by, the slightest mishap can turn into major drama. However, most of the time I set her boundaries where she can wander and let her go and somehow she survives all the same mishaps just fine. Whenever we cross paths we will ride the lift or ski down together but usually she is on her own. I try to keep her confined to an area where I can see her skiing down while I am riding up a lift or vice versa.

We are planning our first ever ski vacation out west this spring.

I am fairly new to this site but I really enjoy it. You will too. I am glad you brought up the family ski forum.
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
February 21, 2008
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
Next week, I'm being joyfully victimized by a family invasion from Miami and Nashville. My little 3 bedroom place will look like a Daytona Beach Holiday Inn during College Spring Break. With 10 people and a dog, including two 6-yr olds. The two-week tornado will feature a van filled with food, and morning thrpugh evening skiing. Only a once-a-year tradition but well worth it...

For my family members new to skiing, I usually save my Christmas present for when they're visiting, in the form of a private ski instructor for two days. With the techniques and the equipment of today, they can ski all the greens the second day, and blues within a week. And before their two-week stay, they can usually do some of the blacks. For the 20-something young family members, usually very athletic, their second year finds them doing Shay's Revenge (double black) that year. Kids, on the other hand, are off the scale as far as learning...

I find skiing to be the greatest family sport around. It is my passion.
kwillg6
February 21, 2008
Member since 01/18/2005 🔗
2,034 posts
 Originally Posted By: lbotta


I find skiing to be the greatest family sport around. It is my passion.

Took the words out of my mouth \:\)
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
February 21, 2008
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
 Originally Posted By: kwillg6
Now it is the time to switch to winter beer


That and the family go together. That, powder, groomers, a fireplace, and the family are an unbeatable combination
GRK
February 21, 2008
Member since 12/19/2007 🔗
404 posts
Ibotta

I agree with you 100%. Skiing has become a shared passion for my daughter and I. My wife would use the word obsession rather than passion. She does not ski, but she sees how much it means to the 2 of us and how it brings us together.

We are going to Park City soon and the wife is coming along for the company and the road trip. We are going to have to find a way to make it special for her as well.
The Colonel - DCSki Supporter
February 22, 2008
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
3,107 posts
GRK,
One thing you might want to do while in Utah is attend the Thursday evening practice of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir in Temple Square. The building is magnificent, no nails, etc. and you really can hear a penny drop to the floor from the back of this immense building. You do not have to be Mormon to go into the Tabernacle building and attend the practice. I also recommend touring the other buildings (visitor centers) in Temple Square, except the Temple itself, which is reserved for Mormons. Quite impressive!!! You might check the website to make sure the choir is practicing when you are in Utah. It's a short drive from your home base in Park City.
The Colonel \:\)
The Colonel - DCSki Supporter
February 22, 2008
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
3,107 posts
I agree with all about skiing being a passion, albeit not really understood by non skiers. What I tell my friends is that when skiing I can really forget all my problems, whatever...you have to concentrate on what you are doing. Most other sports do not afford this level of escape.
The Colonel
GRK
February 22, 2008
Member since 12/19/2007 🔗
404 posts
Colonel, I definitely want to hear that choir in person. I checked the website and looks like we should be able to make it. We are really excited about the trip!

GRK
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
February 24, 2008
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
You know, once the "bug" bites, you're hooked for life... About five years ago, I convinced one of my cousins whom I had not seen since he was 6, to come up to the mountain with his new bride and try skiing. Well... Six years later, half of Miami comes over to my condo, along with a gaggle from Nashville. Ten cousins, kids and the family matriarch come over. Cuban cooking galore, dancing, merriment, and yes, massive amounts of skiing. Two weeks of fun.

In this case, the sport of skiing got a family together, after being splintered across the continent. Everyone enjoys the reunion, and shops till they're dead.
The Colonel - DCSki Supporter
February 24, 2008
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
3,107 posts
"Shops"???? Meaning??? Especially at The Shoe.
The Colonel \:\)
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