Apres ski at Snowshoe?
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Steve
January 1, 2008
Member since 02/15/2006 🔗
160 posts
Hey all you Shoe lovers,

We will be up (down?) for the first time MLK weekend and the wife needs to know:

Where should we eat? Reservations? Foxfire Grill? Village Bistro? Is there a micro brewery? Should I bring beer or can you find a good selection there (wife is a lush <BG>)?

Pizza for the kids (17 going on 25)?

Also do Cingular/AT&T cel phones work? What about wifi?

We're staying at Whistlepunk so we hope to walk to restauants at night.

Anything I forgot to ask?

Thanks for all your help.

Steve
Clay
January 1, 2008
Member since 04/11/2006 🔗
555 posts
Steve,
I haven't been to the Shoe for a while, so I'll leave the dining to someone more knowledgeable. I can tell you however that your cell phones and wireless won't work - that area is a radio free zone because of the radio telescope not far from the resort. But hey - it's good to get away, right? ;\)

The Colonel - DCSki Supporter
January 1, 2008
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
3,107 posts
Steve,
Despite the previous post I have had luck with AT&T cell service at the Shoe, at least I did last February. Connectivity is certainly not everywhere, but if you frequently look for a signal, you might find one, obviously near the top, perhaps in the big parking lot.
The Colonel \:\)
skier219
January 1, 2008
Member since 01/8/2005 🔗
1,318 posts
I had mixed results with my last phone (Alltel digital) at Snowshoe, but the phone before that (Alltel digital/analog) worked pretty well. When I skied there a couple weeks ago, I was glad to see that my new iPhone (AT&T/Cingular) works up there, including the data service. But the signal strength did vary quite a bit depending where on the mountain I was.

If you can, bring groceries and cook your own meals. In my experience, the food in the village ranges from OK to bad, is inconsistent from visit to visit, and the restaurants can be quite crowded on weekends (MLK is about the worst). I can't remember if the prices were reasonable or not, but I know other folks seem to think it's pricey. We tend to do our own cooking when we stay on the mountain.
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Clay
January 1, 2008
Member since 04/11/2006 🔗
555 posts
See? I told you I hadn't been there for a while Maybe it's different now that everything is digital..
Ullr
January 1, 2008
Member since 11/27/2004 🔗
531 posts
I'll echo 219's comments. There are really only 3 resturants. Foxfire (the best but it will be totally jammed). The Junction (not that good, but it will still be packed on MLK) and Cheat Mtn Pizza (the pizza is not that good, and have had to wait over an hour on a non-busy time). The little grocery store (Wildcat Provisions) is very small. Bring your own groceries and cook in the condo.
snowglobe
January 1, 2008
Member since 03/12/2007 🔗
150 posts
I was there during X'mas and was able to use my Cingular phone up there from the hotel room (We stayed at Rimfire in the village). Wifi works in the lobby of Rimfire lodge and at Starbuck but not in my room, they provide a cable to connect to the internet in the room though (Not sure about Whistlepunk -- you should check with Guest Services or the owner of the unit)

Restaurants in the village are on the pricey side. Entrees (dinner) range from $20-$30 at Foxfire Grill and Village Bistro while lunch sandwitches/burgers cost about $10 (There is also a new food court at Shaver center) From my experience, I find the food to be pretty decent. I especially like ribs at Foxfire Grill -- yummy. Your kids can grab pizza at Cheat Mountain Pizza in the village. The Junction might be the place to grab some beer for you.

As far as I know, Foxfire grill does not take reservation. Fortunately, I was staying in the village and I could wait comfortably one hour (that 's usual for dinner on the weekend) in my hotel room.

A walk from Whistlepunk to the village/restaurants is about 10 minute. Not too bad on a not-too-cold day.

MLK weekend will be definitely crowded.. Maybe it 's a good idea to bring groceries and cook yr own meals.
Steve
January 1, 2008
Member since 02/15/2006 🔗
160 posts
<<If you can, bring groceries and cook your own meals...We tend to do our own cooking when we stay on the mountain. >>

Oh, this'll be at treat for my wife the non-skier. We had planned to bring food for the chilins, my son and two friends, but thought we'd be able to get out. Hmm, an hour wait for inconsistent food, can't wait.

Foxfire does seem to be the best choice, maybe Sunday will be better. We're staying until Tuesday morning and I'm hoping the slopes clear a little bit on Monday.

Great news on the phones though.

Thanks for all the help.
Steve
BlizzardMax
January 2, 2008
Member since 09/13/2006 🔗
6 posts
Suggestion, if you really want a great meal out while you are at the shoe, try The Elk River Lodge. I have had a place up there for years and we go to the Elk River almost every visit and I mean at least 20 or more a year and never get tired of it. Great food and atmosphere, prices $17-30. They are never off the mark. Located 7 mi. south on 219 from SN main entrance right after Beckwith Lumber Company. Website is ertc.com. They have a menu link. You should make reservations if you go on a weekend or holiday as it is very popular and the inn is often full during ski and biking season. For the the "Village" stick w/Foxfire or the Bistro. The retuned Auntie Pastas in the bottom of ML was pretty good last season (not much on atmosphere), haven't yet tried "South of Sycamore" in the old Red Fox location. The Junction is only for drinking. Burgers are good though. I will not comment on "Ember". If you need groceries the best bet is the "Market" across from the Inn at Snowshoe at the bottom of the main entrance.

Always take a phone card to Snowshoe. The observatory restrictions successfully keep it a radio free zone. WiFi is good in most of Village, especially the commom areas of the Mountain Lodge where you can might actually find a seat and not have to deal with pubesent teen scene at Starbucks.

Good Luck and great skiing!!
Ullr
January 2, 2008
Member since 11/27/2004 🔗
531 posts
 Originally Posted By: BlizzardMax
The retuned Auntie Pastas in the bottom of ML was pretty good last season (not much on atmosphere), haven't yet tried "South of Sycamore" in the old Red Fox location.


I saw that. Auntie's was really good years ago, when it was a free standing building in the village! There was a mexican resturant at TOTW, but it left a lot to be desired. We ate there once. I love spicy food. My wife got a regular burrito and couldn't eat it. I took one bite, and it was without a doubt the hottest thing I have ever eaten! We still talk about it to this day. Had to stop off at the cafeteria in the lodge for her to get a sandwich. The Red Fox was excellent, and it is a real shame that it is gone. I have some very fond memories of that place.
Steve
January 2, 2008
Member since 02/15/2006 🔗
160 posts
BlizzardMax,

Thanks for the reviews. Is it hard to get on and off the mountain when it snows? I have a 4-wheeler and hope we can explore a little bit.

Phonecard is a good idea, just to make sure my other son hasn't burned the house down.

Steve
MangyMarmot
January 2, 2008
Member since 12/25/2002 🔗
183 posts
We ate at Auntie PAsta's a couple weeks ago. I have to say it was REALLY disappointing.
We'd eaten at its previous incarnation by what used to be Spruce Lodge and remembered it as decent. I can't say it is anymore.

And yeh, the radio telescope imposes a radio blackout. My verizon phone got no signal.

wish I'd taken my laptop, could have used Skype.

There's a pretty good bakery on the drive (the standard route everyone seems to take) to Snowshoe. It's on your right mebbe 5 minutes or so after u pass the Radio Telescope observatory place. Can't remember the name, but they had pretty good cinammon buns we got for breakfast.

mm
skier219
January 2, 2008
Member since 01/8/2005 🔗
1,318 posts
I've always wondered about that bakery, unfortunately it's usually closed when I drive by early in the morning or late at night.
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
January 2, 2008
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
Steve, answering your queries - here's my scoop:

1. There is a cell phone antenna on the Western side of the resort. It is an ATT/Cingular antenna. My friends with Nextel have also been able to have reception there. You should be able to have reception at Whistlepunk as you will be right on the other side. Especially if you're on the upper floors.

2. Restaurants: No one mentioned the new entry, Ember, fully accessible by the shuttle service. Rather than a narrative, I'll address each one:

1. Mountain top, first prize: Ember (reservations 304-571-1111). This one gets Lou's four-star rating. Brian Ball's creation last year, awesome place in the first floor of the Soaring Eagle Lodge. You'd think you're in New York's Soho, Philly's Olde City, or DC's U STreet Corridor, not at Snowshoe. Kitchen is open until 2230 on weekends. Has a sushi bar, and the food is exquisite. Upscale clientele, average bill including drinks is about $50. This is the ONLY place topside that takes reservations. The Marketplace next door sells unusual and exotic jams, breads, and delicacies. The only place within 120 miles of Snowshoe where you can get fresh baguettes and homemade, fresh, rosemary and olive tapenade.

2. The Foxfire. Another of Brian's (run by his ex-wife) creations. Lou's three and a half stars only because of the wait. In the village at the end of the Rimfire condo. Spectacular views for Western-seated tables. No reservations. But you can get seated without a wait if you plan dinner at around 1700-1800. After that, forget it. I don't wait for tables, so other than the bar, I never eat there on weekends. The food is upscale redneck with class. Barbecue-flavored ahi tuna, for example, on wasabe udon noodles. Their Barbequesadillas are the rage. The bar has an excellent collection of West Virginia microbrews. Friendly staff. The manager, Chad, is very responsive to his clients. For top service, ask for Amanda, she's been at that business for about ten years. About $30 per person with wine/beer.

3. The Bistro: Run by a Charlotte, NC-based concern. At the Village, ground floor of Allegheny Springs. Lou's three-star rating. A more upscale TGIF or Ruby Tuesdays. Excellent ahi tuna appetizers, their Asian Chicken dinner salad is my favorite. Their Filet Mignon is fork-cutting tender for a reasonably good price. They also have a few seafood specialties, all of them good to excellent, including a finger-licking salmon. Overall: Good, appetizing American style food. With wine, about $30 per person. Also the place to go for a late lunch if you want to ski during the 1100-1200 lunch lull and then have lunch. Great burgers and club sandwiches. The Bistro is also the place for Sunday Brunch, great Eggs Benedict.

4. The Junction: On the Village, at Highland House. Lou's half a star. It is a high-priced, McDonald's wannabe. My humble apologies to McDonald's... I used to say that the Junction was the place you went to, if you wanted to see how our immigrant ancestors were treated at Ellis Island. Intrawest is a great developer, but their restaurants generally emulate a giant vaccuum cleaner - if you catch my drift, and the Junction is no exception. They have some really nice, eager to serve employees, mismanaged to oblivion by the historically callous management of the place. What gets my goat the most about the Junction is that they have a Gestapo-like rule about their breakfast service that exemplifies their attitude towards their customers. At 1100 they stop serving breakfast on Sunday. Hello?! Most people begin the day at that time on Sunday, or go for Sunday Brunch. And besides, what's so disruptive about throwing a couple of eggs on a hot oiled pan? I make the point every so often and go there ten minutes after their "official" end of the breakfast just to prove the point. Then invariably, I end up in an argument with the manager about how he thinks inconceivable that people would dear want eggs at 1110 in the morning and how dear a customer wants food prepared in any other way than the chef desires to prepare it. Fortunately, the Bistro, accross the walk, has caught on and they take the Junction's Sunday business away, by offering several brunch selections including Eggs Benedict. The only reason for going to the Junction is if all the other restaurants have disappeared from Snowshoe, you've run out of food at your condo, and you're resorting to either eating the leather out of the sofa or eating at the Junction.

5. Auntie Pasta: At the Village, but in the lower floor of the Convention Center. Lou's two and a half stars. No reservations. Auntie Pasta used to be Snowshoe's oldest eatery, in the space now occupied by the Seneca Lodge, and the name is dear in the hearts of many old-timers at the 'Shoe. No reservations. Like the menu says, Italian. Go early. But expect generally good, hearty and appetizing food, if sometimes a bit institutional. Friendly service. Excellent views on a late afternoon/early evening.

6. Cheat Mountain Pizza House: Has turned into a good standby. Great luncheon place and convenient easy and uncomplicated dinner. Pizzas are amazingly good, perhaps because I am invariably famished whenever I'm there... Really, they are good. So are their calzones. Incredible beer selection. Service is spotty when busy but expected for the price and the locale. But the food makes up for it.

7. Red Rover: Brand new this year. I haven't been yet when it was open, but been told: Boar sausages, hot dogs, sausages from everywhere. Even a veggie entree. Totally casual. Next to the Foxfire Grille. Consider that it is a Brian Ball creation, it WILL be good.

8. Shaver's Center Cafeteria: Only for Breakfast and lunch. Used to be a decrepit cafeteria serving greasy hamburgers. I was totally surprised this year they transformed the place into an upscale cafeteria with new appliances, a new, healthy selection of lunch entrees, and cooked-on-site soups and stews. Noticeably absent is the No.10 can taste. Pleasant improvement! They are open for dinner too, although I can't attest to their quality.

9. Brandy's at the base of the mountain, the Inn at Snowshoe. Lou's two-and-a-half stars. Old standby with generally good selections and a long-standing reputation for quality. New York Strip is what I vividly remember of the place last year. Good bar. Nice place to take your children, especially if the mountain top places are busier than an old Soviet breadline.

OFF MOUNTAIN

1. Elk River: At the Elk River Touring Center http://www.ertc.com/ Lou's four stars. Six miles from the base of Snowshoe, ERTC has one of the best restaurants in West Virginia. Casual, classy, outstanding food. Reservations required and if you are a walk-in, they may serve you, but would rather turn you away than give everyone else crummy service and food. The Elk River is great faire, period. Their local rainbow trout is incredible. Roasted duck... yummy. I also tried their Panang Curry Salmon. A delight. And a cast of all homemade desserts that will make any "Biggest Loser" contestant leave the show. Despite the awesome service and food, included wine, we left with monetary damage less than $40 per person. You can even make a reservation online at https://www185.safesecureweb.com/Reserve/Reserve/registration.cfm?type=Dinner

2. Brazen Head Inn: http://brazenheadinn.com/ Six miles to the North of the base of Snowshoe, in little 'ole Mingo. Lou's three stars. First, about one of the most congenial inns you can visit. It has become a center of Celtic music for West Virginia and, if they have an event during MLK weekend, when you're there, it may be wise to bring the kids to dinner and music. It will be unforgettable. In one of my visits about a year after it opened, there was a jam session with a group of octogenarian gospel singers coming out of nowhere, and I had a knot in my throat for most of the evening, as I realized that in this wonderful country of ours, I was witnessing something that was rapidly becoming extinct, and that some of the sweetest most memorable music I had ever heard, from these nice old folk would be soon silenced as time and generations pass away. They have a musical calendar in their web site. As far as their food, it is genuinely good hearty Celtic infused West Virginia. Paddy Cakes, Roast Beef and Cabbage, and others, are the heart of their cooking. No big frills, reservations required. Total family style and family dedicated.

Anyway, my best wishes for a great holiday!!!
yellowsnow
January 2, 2008
Member since 12/15/2005 🔗
268 posts
Wow, what an outstanding review and reply.
I have never been to Snowshoe but I'm sold on going now.
Bravo, kudos, merci beaucoup, thanks. Thoroughly enjoyed that!
Stumpy
January 2, 2008
Member since 12/12/2007 🔗
20 posts
I live at Snowshoe. Absolutely great spot on review Lou.

Stumpy
The Colonel - DCSki Supporter
January 2, 2008
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
3,107 posts
Steve,
Do you really want to know that the "other son" burned down the house"? It would ruin a great ski trip.
Instead, just be surprised when you return home.
The Colonel \:\)
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
January 2, 2008
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
The Colonel, the Fanning story is an apparent compendium of tragedies. Another son had his foot mangled in the building of the place. But I won't let someone's misfortune influence on what has become the Celtic cultural center in the area. It happens everywhere. I was just reading about one of France's cultural icons, Edith Piaf, whose life was one tragedy after another. So was our Marilyn Monroe, so was Vincent Van Gough.

Let bygones be bygones and let's rejoice in the fact that the Brazen Head is standing, where it does, to the credit of our cultural heritage. That's all I care about.
zmre2b
January 2, 2008
Member since 03/8/2006 🔗
5 posts
My AT&T/cingular blackberry worked fine (including data connection) from soaring eagle lodge and many other places at snowshoe.

That is a GSM system (AT&T/cingular, T-mobile, vodaphone, most european phones) so any GSM phone that can roam should work ok.

CDMA phones (sprint, verizon (except for their world phone)) have no connection at all.

I second Ember as probably the best restaurant on the mountain. The menu, wine list, decor and that they take reservations are all great. The service and food execution is a little below big city standards, but way above ski resort standards.

The Marketplace next door sells good panini sandwiches -- good for a quick hot lunch.
Scott - DCSki Editor
January 2, 2008
Member since 10/10/1999 🔗
1,139 posts
I have to say, I think this thread exemplifies all that is good about DCSki. Tons of great actionable, objective, firsthand advice in a short period of time.

It's been a few years since I've been to Snowshoe, but I agree that Brian Ball has produced a string of great mountaintop restaurants. On one media trip he hosted visitors for a multi-course dinner at Red Fox, and then took us over to the Foxfire, which he had just opened. Foxfire is (was?) known for including fried pickles with your sandwiches, and Brian let all of us try frying various food items -- the sky was the limit. Yes, people were a little drunk, but it was a good time. I still dream of having an industrial fryer in my kitchen one day.
fishnski
January 2, 2008
Member since 03/27/2005 🔗
3,530 posts
WHEWWW...I was going to skip this thread but I am glad I didn't...That was an awesome review there Mr Ibotta!..You must have just got back from a trip to your Java(Crack light) house..You were on fire!..How long did it take you?...even had some humor there..good job..
Ullr
January 2, 2008
Member since 11/27/2004 🔗
531 posts
Great job Lou. I still do not remember the name of the mexican place at TOTW. Tequila Mama's? Does that ring a bell with anyone? I think it is called Hoot's now.

I too have seen the bakery, but it is always closed.

If anyone is looking for a real treat, trying going around St. Paddy's day weekend, and cut through the little town of Monteray during the Maple Festival, and try their maple doughnuts.
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
January 2, 2008
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
Actually, fish, just had dinner at Hank's Oyster House and had some succulent sable fish followed by two double-espressos... :-)

Appreciate the nice comments.
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
January 2, 2008
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
Thanks, Ullr... You jiggled my memory... The bakery between Green Bank and Cass is called Merc's Bakery, I had the phone handy from a previous purchase, (304) 456-4042. It is a Mennonite Bakery and it is immaculately clean and you can see the folks in the back working. Open everyday except Sunday and Monday.

Merc's has an outstanding selection of breads, most of them in the German-infusion variety. No baguettes or crusty breads, though. Homemade pies, cakes, pastries and desserts. All of them outstanding. Their snacks, such as the sesame seed sticks and the like, are so good that I make a point to stop by and get about $40 of them whenever I stop by. It is worth the 15-minute stop. Come to think of it, I still have some homemade ketchup that is "to die for".

Going to Snowshoe on Route 28 South, once you turn right on Route 66 after Greenbank, you will have a total straight road going through grassy meadows for about a mile. Merc's is on the right side of the road, right before the end of the straight part of the road. Bavarian-looking white house with dark wood trim.
The Colonel - DCSki Supporter
January 3, 2008
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
3,107 posts
Lou,
Wonderful review of the eateries at the Shoe. Maybe I missed it, but what has taken the place of the Red Fox? And what is it like?
Thanks for the tip about the bakery!
The Colonel \:\)
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
January 3, 2008
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
 Originally Posted By: The Colonel
what has taken the place of the Red Fox? And what is it like?The Colonel \:\)


BlizzzardMax wrote it about 10 messages before, it is called "South of Sycamore". Haven't been to it, will try it this weekend. The place in the old Red Fox is incredibly located, but, from what I had been told... it just had some safety fire code issues and was obviously non-ADA compliant. So whoever took it over needed to do some work. We'll see...
Stumpy
January 3, 2008
Member since 12/12/2007 🔗
20 posts
It is my understanding that "South of the Sycamore" did not open for the season. I think there were some lease issues, but not sure of the details.
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
January 3, 2008
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
Ah so... This may be only repeat only conjecture, but I bet the ADA and other fire code issues probably had a lot to do in the lease permutations. If so, it would be too bad, as the locale is absolutely first rate.
Steve
January 3, 2008
Member since 02/15/2006 🔗
160 posts
Lou,

That is an OUTSTANDING review of the restaurants at the shoe. My wife will be delighted to hear that reservations can be made at one of the better restaurants. The bakery also sounds like a great side trip on the way in. Thanks so much for taking the time to pound all that out.

I have to admit that you guys are really making me look forward to this trip.

BTW, how many Lou's stars do our local restaurants earn, say Grapeseed in Bethesda or Basins in Vienna?

Steve
Steve
January 3, 2008
Member since 02/15/2006 🔗
160 posts
Do you really want to know that the "other son" burned down the house"? It would ruin a great ski trip.
Instead, just be surprised when you return home.
The Colonel \:\)

Ahh.. to know the house has been burned down or just imagine it for several days in a row...such choices! I'm sure there will be a surprise when I get home, it's the list of possibilities that always gets me.

Colonel, you must have children.

Steve
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
January 3, 2008
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
Hi Steve, compared to Grapeseed, pluses and minuses which would get my four stars too in either. The wine menu at Grapeseed is a bit more published, but Brian could surprise you at Embers with a Laffite Rotschild or a Latour also... The menu at Grapeseed is more hearty and urban. Embers seems to me, a little lighter. Both places specialize in exotic sauces. So... try it.
The Colonel - DCSki Supporter
January 3, 2008
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
3,107 posts
Steve,
I have three growen children and 6.7 grandchildren.
I did not begin skiing until a friend got me hooked at age 29, nearly 38 years ago. I started all my kid at age 3-4 and they all love the sport. Daughter, now 39, skis, monoskis, and snowboards; son now 37 learned to ski but now only boards; and ditto for my 28 year old son. One grandchild, now 6 began skiing two years ago, another, now 4 began last year. Both are at best novices and I will have them in lessons at Seven Springs this weekend.
The Colonel \:\)
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
January 4, 2008
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
Two additions to my Snowshoe dining reviews as of today... Lunchtime...

I went to Hoots, which is in the place where the Rosa's Cantina used to be, in the ground floor of Top of the World. What a disappointment. Together with the Junction, they rank as the worst food in the resort and possibly some of the worst in West Virginia. I went to Hoots after suffering hunger pangs, since I arrived at Snowshoe after 1 AM and skipped breakfast. Skied in the new Soaring Eagle territory and then headed off to Hoots just to try it. I made a mistake.

The place hasn't had a coat of paint since Rosas was there. Crowded, smelly. Disorderly. The line to order food circled around tables. Lots of people paying but very little coming out. The menu seemed like a takeoff from an old London Fish and Chips place -- Fried Everything. I ordered the Chicken Tenders just to keep my stomach from grumbling. After a half an hour, I got an overdone collection of sticks that better resembled "Chicharrones" (Caribbean-style fried pork skins) than chicken. I politely placed the chicken non-tenders in the trash and left the place, stepped into my skis, and after a run to Ballhooter Lift, went into the Village and stepped into the newly opened Red Rover.

A welcome change to both my attitude and my grumbling stomach. Red Rover is another one of Brian Ball's creations. And it is a success. First, the food: Sausages and hot dogs are the main menu, but made into yuppie creations that will match a discriminating palate. I tried the Tapas Dog, which is a Central-American-style Chorizo (spicier than the original Spanish chorizo) with goat cheese, cabbage, and apricot chipotle aioli. Ohmygod! I chose the WV microbrew Mountain State Pale Ale to make the sausage company. As I was sitting at the bar, I asked the other seat mates about their choices. A nice vegetarian lady was having the NoDog, with avocado and tomato in a chipotle mayo and cheddar. Her significant other was having the manly Beef dog with guacamole. To my other side, two gentlemen were having the Kobe Beef dog with mushrooms and wasabe, and the Italian sausage with spicy pomedoro tomato sauce. Compliment that with about a fifteen-beer selection, a page-full of wine selections, and you've got a fast, quality, appetizing lunch. For the no-dog variety, they offer Mac and Cheese, Onion Rings, salads, etc. My stomach was certainly pleased. My barmates were also singing the praises of Brian's hot dog creation.

Amazing that out of such a simple concept as a sausage, someone can create an entire restaurant. Fast, tasty, clean, with outstanding service. Their tables are small, so I'd gather that if you have a gaggle of people, it would be hard to get everyone seated together.

Well worth taking off your skis and walking the 100-feet from the snow to the restaurant.

By the way, I also corroborated the fact that South of Sycamore is not open this season. A group of local entrepreneurs actually worked on the place to remedy the safety and health discrepancies but the deal fell through at the last minute, reportedly centered on a dispute about the gross revenue take by the landlord. So now the place, on one of the prime locations at Snowshoe, sits empty. What a shame.
crunchy
January 4, 2008
Member since 02/22/2007 🔗
596 posts
i admire your enthusiasm towards good eats. love the detailed reviews. food is of course the best thing after a good day of skiing. well..good beer and music can't be left out tho \:\)
Steve
January 5, 2008
Member since 02/15/2006 🔗
160 posts
Lou,

We tried Grapeseed the friday before Christmas with my wife's sister and her husband. Overall, a good meal, I had the fillet mignon with oxtail sauce and Rita had the scallops, blackened. The waiter recommended a very good Shiraz that went well with the earthy taste of the oxtail sauce. We had stopped in before for wine, but had not eaten there. I really appreciate the many wine choices by the glass.

We have reservations for Embers on the Saturday of our trip, two weeks from tomorrow! Thanks for all your recommendations.
Steve
Steve
January 5, 2008
Member since 02/15/2006 🔗
160 posts
 Originally Posted By: The Colonel
Steve,
I have three growen children and 6.7 grandchildren.

The Colonel \:\)


6.7 Grandchildren, damn you're pretty sure of yourself. I have 2 boys, not yet growen. If I can get them through the next 4 or 5 years, they have a chance to become decent adults.

The boys picked up snowboarding 7 or 8 years ago so my wife started planning winter vacations for them. I got tired of watching everybody have fun on the slopes but me, so I started skiing 2 years ago at age 49. I kind of figured it would give us something to do together as we got older. If I can ever catch up, that may happen yet. When (if) grandchildren arrive, they'll be on the slopes early.
Steve
dcunitedfan
January 15, 2008
Member since 01/15/2008 🔗
1 posts
I think the reviews in this thread are spot on. I just got back from a weekend at Snowshoe, my second trip up this season. I discovered Snowshoe in 2005, so my experience is limited to the past few years.

My favorite restaurant over that time period has to be Foxfire, based on the number of visits. But Ember will soon take its place. I have only eaten at Ember twice now, but both times the food and service were miles ahead of anything else at Snowshoe. Last year I enjoyed the sushi, this year it was the filet. Do not go to Snowshoe without trying Ember.

I also like Red Rover. I had a boar sausage topped with onions, mustard, and apples drenched in a sweet cinnamon sauce. Could there be a better ski lunch?

I also like the Cheat Mountain Pizza Company.

The rest of the restaurants all fall into the same mediocre or worse category in my mind. Most of the time I would rather eat at the little snack huts on the slopes (The Boat House, Arbuckles Cabin, Black Run Sugar House).

Enjoy your trip.
Murphy
January 15, 2008
Member since 09/13/2004 🔗
618 posts
 Originally Posted By: lbotta
I went to Hoots, which is in the place where the Rosa's Cantina used to be, in the ground floor of Top of the World. What a disappointment. Together with the Junction, they rank as the worst food in the resort and possibly some of the worst in West Virginia.


Before you rank anything as the worst at Snowshoe you need to go to the cafeteria at Silver Creek. Or better yet, don't and take my word for it. My daughter's elementary school cafeteria is head and shoulders above that place. Other than the cabin at the bottom, is there another place to eat at Silver Creek?
The Colonel - DCSki Supporter
January 15, 2008
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
3,107 posts
Murphy,
Although I have yet to get up to the Shoe this year, I must agree with the comments on the eating situation at Silver Creek.
They have the cafe which is really poor at night, in fact most all the time in both selection and quality. I can not remember the speciality at the on-slope eatery, waffles, pancakes, something like that, but my experience there has been much better. From frequent past years Snowshoe trips, if staying at Silver Creek, take the shuttle bus to the village, or find a place off the mountain.
The Colonel \:\)
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
January 29, 2008
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
 Originally Posted By: Steve
Lou, We have reservations for Embers on the Saturday of our trip, two weeks from tomorrow! Thanks for all your recommendations.
Steve


Steve, wonder how your Embers visit went. We went there this past weekend, with reservations, as everywhere else there was an hour-plus wait. I had their seafood stir-fry that was (in the words of Linda Richman) "to die for"... Generous proportions of shrimp, salmon, scallops, in a succulent sauce with udon. My other guests had the escolar with the oversized Israeli cuscous, which is my favorite.

Noticed there were several posts about Silver Creek. I'm returning to the Shoe in three weeks and, just for fun, will eat lunch and dinner at Silver Creek just to see what they offer.
Steve
January 30, 2008
Member since 02/15/2006 🔗
160 posts
Lou,

Embers was a hit, especially with my wife. We had reservations at 7:30 and we went early to walk around and see what else was up there. Well...there we were at 7:00 having seen all there was to see so to the bar for a drink and appetizers. Rita had the crab rangoons, an excellent dish. I tried the California roll, not bad at all for a non-Japanese place. Then we split the caesar salad (also excellent) and had the steak and filet. Overall, too much food! Service was excellent, wine pours were generous (which was pretty true in most of the Snowshoe bars). Would go back again in a heartbeat.

We also tried Foxfire, about a 40 minute wait with temps below zero. Got a table about 15 feet from the door with constant commings and goings (Shut the door!). Food was passable for pub food, I had the ribs which don't compare to Red, Hot, & Blue (very few do!). meal was out of the kitchen in 10 minutes after we ordered. While this was Sunday of MLK weekend so I appreciate the crowds, but in no rush to go back.

On Monday I met the wife for lunch and she picked the Junction, much against your advice. Service was good, food was "fine" just nothing to write home about.

We also stopped at the Red Rover, they sell a Miller 40 OZ for $6.00 in a brown paper bag. Not my taste, but obviously a big draw for the younger crowd. Didn't have a chance to try the chorizo, but I wanted to.

We had a great time, snow was fantastic all weekend. While no fresh snow, the temps never got above 20, so what was on the slopes stayed very dry. A little ice on some of the drops where the snow had been scraped or blown off, but only a minor problem. there were a few yahoos (yes, people actually yelling Yahoo)but the cold on Sunday really kept the crowd down. Monday afternoon was a treat as the crowds really thinned.

We may go back in March when spring break rolls around if the snow holds. I'm off to Winter Park tomorrow sans wife and kids for a long weekend. Thanks again for all your advice.

Steve
skier219
January 31, 2008
Member since 01/8/2005 🔗
1,318 posts
Steve, sounds like you had a good weekend. I also heard the conditions were great, wish I was there!
The Colonel - DCSki Supporter
January 31, 2008
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
3,107 posts
I assume you did not go to Wintergreen on Sunday after getting back from Alta?
The Colonel \:\)
skier219
January 31, 2008
Member since 01/8/2005 🔗
1,318 posts
Nope Colonel, couldn't find the energy to ski on Sunday (or Monday, or Tuesday, or Wednesday). I did make it up to WTG today (Thursday) though. Good skiing, but it felt very strange to be on hard snow, with skinny short skis, and I actually needed to use the ski edges. Those three days at Alta/Bird last week really ruined me for east coast hardpack....
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