2 Unrelated Questions
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David
March 15, 2007
Member since 06/28/2004 🔗
2,444 posts
1. I have been considering buying a new backpack to use for hiking/fishing/biking trips. Here lately (especially because of the possible meeting for skiing in April) I figured I might as well buy one that I can attach skis to. Anyone have any recomendations for a good pack? I am not looking for something that is huge, but I would like something that is moderate sized. Another question I had was which for of ski attachment is most perfered? On the sides angled up? On the back straight up and down?? Any feedback would be awesome!


2. The other question I had was about ski waxing. I would really like to get my own iron and basic equipment to wax my own skis. I would really like to do this because the only local ski shop is about 30 mins away and doubles as a boat shop. They have already put away all of their ski tuning equipment and got out there boating stuff. This happens every year and makes it a pain to get any waxing done. I believe that having my own waxing equipment would save me a WHOLE lot of hassle. I was wondering if waxing your own skis is worth it? I know some about waxing already but would certainly purchase a handbook and probably DVD before putting a hot iron on my bases. If you were in my position would you get your own gear?

Thanks for any input!!
Clay
March 15, 2007
Member since 04/11/2006 🔗
555 posts
Can't comment on the backpack be would whole-heartly recommend waxing (and tuning) your own skis if you're of a mine to. It's not difficult and there's very little you can do wrong that can't be scraped off and done again. Of course, you could burn the bases, but you would really have to try hard.

This is the first year I've waxed and tuned my own skis and I am very happy. My skis get at least a touch up every weekend and sometimes more often

I would say go for it. Feel free to PM me, or to post questions here if you run into any problems.

Clay
kennedy
March 15, 2007
Member since 12/8/2001 🔗
792 posts
1. Backpack. You should have no problem getting one right now. Look online. My buddy got a really nice one by dakine. Medium size, easy to ski with and it has ski loops.

2. Waxing. Started doing it myself this season and it's really not that hard. Use the temp recommended for the wax and keep the iron moving. Don't let your bases get too hot, i.e. don't stand there with the iron planted on the base while you chat on the phone. The point of a hot wax is to get the base warm enough to accept wax better. As long as you don't melt the damn things you're fine. Afterwards have a good scraper to get the excess off and then use a scotch brite pad to buff and texurize it.

BTW when I was in Utah I used Zardoz Notwax on my base one particularly warm day. Yeah. Think Clarke Griswold in Christmas Vacation on the saucer sled and you get the idea.
David
March 15, 2007
Member since 06/28/2004 🔗
2,444 posts
I plan to try them on at a store and find about what I want as far as size and extras, then I will take to the internet (probably Backcountry) to buy. My main concern with the backpack is ski location. Which is generally perfered? Does it really make a difference? I am completely new to this so I have no clue.
comprex
March 16, 2007
Member since 04/11/2003 🔗
1,326 posts


Hiking/skiing I use 1500-2200 cubic inches, with sternum and waist belts; for biking I'd use something far smaller than that, around 700 cubic inches, that doesn't span the chest and doesn't come up as high on the back, both for sweat evacuation and non-interference with the head/helmet.

For ski attachment, A-frame carry tends to be annoying with low ceiling/canopy or when the tip-tying strap gets loose; diagonal carry is a PITA in narrow places, they're both pesky to deal with for short hikes. A bigger backpack (one I wouldn't wish to bike with) is more stable for them jouncing around on your back.

Waxing:
Swix has online videos, Swix and Toko and Holmenkol have online instructions.
teleman
March 17, 2007
Member since 07/8/2005 🔗
145 posts
check out tognar.com,

I have been tuning my own for years and only use a local shop for restructuring after a major base repair. The more wax applications the better your skis will glide. I am always amazed at the number of people who do not wax and ski on dry bases.
David
March 18, 2007
Member since 06/28/2004 🔗
2,444 posts
Quote:

check out tognar.com,





Thanks for the info!! Already checked it out and just got a catalog from them the other day. They seem like a very customer oriented company which is awesome. I will most likely order one of their beginner kits that comes with a video.

Oh yeah, I have a few buddies that never get their skis waxed. They think that it isn't important. If they only knew how nice it is skiing on freshly waxed skis.....
comprex
March 19, 2007
Member since 04/11/2003 🔗
1,326 posts
also:

www.artechski.com
www.reliableracing.com
www.slidewright.com
www.racewax.com
www.the-raceplace.com
www.skiwax.ca

You should be able to get both the TOKO and Swix tuning guides as free downloads, for example here; get both the alpine and the nordic (read all of it, reading's free) as the nordic covers a lot more snow/waxing detail. The printed booklets are worth it for the illustrations (e.g. the wax penetration one in the Toko manual) that are not available in the freebies. swix does an online video at www.swixschool.no , however, it is not very suitable for fringe conditions such as prevail for the Mid-Atlantic as you kind of have to mix and match techniques from the recreational and the racing pull-down video.

The basic task is not that difficult, the devil is in the details, and the details can be condition specific. Probably the best thing you can do is to keep a notebook of -EXACTLY- what you did to your skis so that you can figure out problems when they occur. This is actually more important when you start sharpening edges, you'd be amazed at how quickly we forget sharpen/don't sharpen/just run a gummi stone down 'em decisions so that we wind up with skis that were last sharpened, oh, October '05.

Once you have specific questions, just shout.
comprex
March 21, 2007
Member since 04/11/2003 🔗
1,326 posts
Quote:

The printed booklets are worth it for the illustrations (e.g. the wax penetration one in the Toko manual) that are not available in the freebies.




Article (in German) here, has some of the Toko pix.
David
April 12, 2007
Member since 06/28/2004 🔗
2,444 posts
Just pulled the trigger on a Toko 1200/600 iron on SAC. It is my first ever purchase on the site. I must say that it was an intense rush for me entering in my credit card info as fast as humanly possible. I sure hope everything was right. Thanks for the advice everyone!!!
SpringsRegular
April 14, 2007
Member since 10/14/2004 🔗
153 posts
look for the Dakine Heli Pro II on SAC
David
April 14, 2007
Member since 06/28/2004 🔗
2,444 posts
Quote:

look for the Dakine Heli Pro II on SAC




Checked it out on Backcountry. Is a 1600 cu in' pack big enough to carry both boots and a few other things. When I say a few other things I don't really mean very much but this pack doesn't look much if any bigger than my backpack I carry books everyday to class. Any thoughts from anyone?
comprex
April 14, 2007
Member since 04/11/2003 🔗
1,326 posts
One vote for the 1800-2000 ci range.

I can strap my 27.0 boots on the outside of the old beaver-tailed Heli Pro, but I can put them IN the bigger pack and have one compartment free. My old BD attack pack used to be triple duty airline boot bag/ski pack/rock climbing pack.
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