Good ski/board coat?
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7 users
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bawalker
January 31, 2006
Member since 12/1/2003 🔗
1,547 posts
I'm looking for a new coat for this year to use that is light weight, less constricting, and keeps me ultra warm. I have a ski coat now that my mom got for me last Christmas and it has worked great. However I've noticed that it does restrict alot of my upper body turning and movements while riding. That doesn't make for such a good thing goind down a black when I really need to be on my reflexes like a cat.

Also one interesting feature I'd like to have is to have an upper pocket either on the right or left side of my chest/shoulder area that would have a flap to it. I'd like to have my 2-way strapped in there (like military personnel do) so with one quick swift reach, I can enable it, talk, and be done.
kennedy
January 31, 2006
Member since 12/8/2001 🔗
792 posts
I bought a Bonfire shell at Wisp during the summer and I'm loving it. It's warm with just a base layer and light fleece without being a boiler. It's very lightweight and the large is cut large enought to allow plenty of movement (I'm 6'2" 220lbs), I'm not sure what model jacket it is but can find out. It has an external vertial zipper pocket on the left side that you can quickly reach into with your right although now that I ride with a day pack all the time I've taken to clipping the radio to the shoulder strap so it's right by my ear so I can hear it and I don't have to fumble to find it. I used to aim for a heavier lined jacket to keep me warm but I've learned that a light shell over a solid base layer is more comfortable. I'm not sure if you do this already but just in case. Buy a breathable top such as Nike Dri-Fit or Under Armour cold gear, sometimes can be picked up cheap at TJ Maxx or Marshalls, and wear that beneath everything else with a microfleece over it and you will be golden. Not hot not cold just right.
Swimmer
January 31, 2006
Member since 02/3/2005 🔗
143 posts
Quote:

I've learned that a light shell over a solid base layer is more comfortable. I'm not sure if you do this already but just in case. Buy a breathable top such as Nike Dri-Fit or Under Armour cold gear, sometimes can be picked up cheap at TJ Maxx or Marshalls, and wear that beneath everything else with a microfleece over it and you will be golden. Not hot not cold just right.




Word. Make like a parfait and dress in layers. For me it's Capilene against the skin, then a Patagonia .5R layer (thin fleece), then an uninsulated hardshell. If chilly I just swap out the R.5 later with something a little heavier.

I ski with a pack that I keep a couple of clothing options in but rarely do I need more except on the most wicked days.

steve
kennedy
January 31, 2006
Member since 12/8/2001 🔗
792 posts
Ditto with the pack. A good day pack is an awesome thing. I used to ride with my pockets full of radios and money and snacks until they were so bulging I could barely bend over. Now I ride with everything in the pack along with my spare gogs, extra layer etc. I bought a camel pack stow away yesterday. It basically is just the pouch portion that slides inside your daypack or can be clipped on with carbiners. The beauty of it is that the bottle and tube are insulated with neoprene so it reduces the chances of liquid freezing up. Liquor also helps this but I wouldn't condone it.
gavin123
February 1, 2006
Member since 11/12/2005 🔗
21 posts
Dont know if you care about being trendy but I have been using the Under Armour cold gear mock neck (which is really just the turtle neck version) with a long sleeve t-shirt and the light shell of my columbia coat. The coat I have has the removable fleece inside which on super cold days I still use but when taken out it is basically a lightweight rain coat. The under armour is not restrictive at all - when you are trying to put it on it feels that way but once you start moving you realize how great it is - its basically thermal spandex and it works great. That's my suggestion, plus you can find the under armour cheaper than you can find a new coat.
jimmy
February 1, 2006
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
2,650 posts
gavin123, that's basically the system i'm using. Just picked up a columbia soft shell, ups man brought it yesterday. Tried a spyder but didn't like the material on the inside of the coat, too "tacky" for my taste. Figure the soft shell will make a good outer layer on spring days, base layer under columbia hardshell on winter days.
MangyMarmot
February 1, 2006
Member since 12/25/2002 🔗
183 posts
I had a Columbia Titanium for about 6 years or so. Wore the heck out of that thing.
I really liked it. Was totally water proof and shell loose enough not too much tightness in shoulders or elbows.
It took a beating and finally the zipper broke when I had too much crap around my neck (zipping up over turtleneck, sweater and scarf for scooter ride in 5 degree weather).
since I bought it through REI, they took it back and gave me a new shell.

I have a Convert now and don't like it very much. Does the job, but doesn't feel right.

Ditto on layers. Haven't tried underarmour but seems like good idea. Tight stuff on the inside and loose on outside.

If you're looking pants too, I got some Marmots that rock.
have fun shpping.
mm
bawalker
February 1, 2006
Member since 12/1/2003 🔗
1,547 posts
Thats interesting because I've never done the layers thing persay. Normally I've always worn a teeshirt with a regular sweater on top and then finally a regular boarding/ski coat. If someone knows of a good site that would showcase several of these things, i'd really like to see it. Anything that gives me flexibility, comfort, and warmth is a winner in my book.
kennedy
February 2, 2006
Member since 12/8/2001 🔗
792 posts
I used to ride with a tee and a light thermal but the problem is that the cotton tee doesn't wick away moisture and let it evaporate it just soaks it up and keeps it next to your skin so you actually feel colder. Because the Under Armour cold gear (there is also heat gear which is for warm weather activities and general working out) has what is known as a compression fit it feels like a second skin. What happens is that sweat and moisture wick out through the material but because it doesn't hold water it evaporates quickly. Most if not all ski/snowboard jackets incorporate breathable fabric that also allow moisture out and many jackets now have vents that also assist this through increased airflow. The key is to make sure your intermediate layer also allows moisture through. So if you have a wicking layer then a cotton layer you still kind of defeat the purpose. Because fleeces are generally synthetic they don't hold moisture well wich is good. If you ever notice after you wash a fleece it almost feels close to dry straight away and it doesn't take long to dry out fully. Thats the property you are looking for.

It sounds like a weird way to keep warm because I've found the compression fit stuff fells cooler when you put it on but when you ride it becomes very comfortable because the raise in body temp cancels it out. The shell's main function for me is to stop wind. As long as it does that and traps a large enough amount of air inside it to keep me comfortable I'm good.

I know you're looking for something cut for more room but don't look for something bulky just because it looks warm. I think you are way better getting warmth through your layers than through built in bulk, especially when it can't be removed. I tend to avoid jackets with heavy fleece linings and stuff because it's overkill. I also make absolutley sure it has underarm vents. Have a look around for some wicking material, doesn't have to be under armor and it doesn't have to be compression fit although thats preferable. You should be able to pick up some pieces for $20 or less if you hunt. I guarantee you will never want to go back to the old soggy tee method.
SCWVA
February 2, 2006
Member since 07/13/2004 🔗
1,051 posts
Stay away from cotton at all costs. The first little bit of perspiration and you'll be freezing your a$$ off. The old fashioned cotton thermal underwear is useless.

I usually wear a two layer long underwear made by Doufold. The innerlayer is a synthetic and the outer layer is 45% wool and the rest is some other type of synthetic. I like the wool in it because it keeps me warm when I ride or ski in the rain.

Campmor

I just bought a Cloudveil RPK jacket. It's a light weight Goretex jacket with sealed seams. It also has a powder skirt and zip pits. It's one of the lightest jackets I could find with a powder skirt. The jacket has no insulation or liner in it. I typically do not get cold and like to dress very lightly.

I also have a 3 layer Goretex jacket by Marmot (I forgot the name of it) for colder days. It also does not have a liner or insulation. It's at least 12 years old and still keeps you dry even in heavy rain (like this past Sunday am at the Shoe). My sister has summitted (sp?) Mt. McKinley (and the two highest peaks in So. American and several peaks around Nepal) on several occasions using this same jacket. I figured if she was relying on this jacket to keep her alive in -45F and 100mph winds, I could take a few ski runs with it.

The best advice I could give is dont' be cheap . If you've ever been really cold, how much would you have paid to get warm? With jackets you get what you paid for.

BTW - I'm not a fan of Columbia or zip in fleece liners. But then again, I don't get cold.
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