Fresh TimberLINES
32 posts
17 users
9k+ views
canaanman
March 14, 2005
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
358 posts
...Okay, I'm very very reluctant to give out this information... but it is unjust for me not to.

When the snow is deep and soft and the woods are full of snow... head to Timberline. I'm about to tell you some of the most secret lines on the entire mountain (lines I, a 10 year local at Timberline just recently discovered).

Head up Silver Queen and after tower 13 keep your eyes peeled. You should see a slanted tree with enough height to go underneath on the left side of the trail and a few meteres upslope of it a downed tree trailside. Okay, when you get to tower 15 look to your left, far left. Right before Silver Streak steepens there is a tight woods entrance on skiers right (as you head down). Build up some speed and enter here. Pick your way through the tight scrub brush and small trees until the trail begins to open more. Now, look for the big blowndown trailside tree and head to the right before you reach it... in the pine trees. Shred all that powdery goodness. If you are up to it, continue down the trail and work your way to the upper connector between The Drop and Silver Streak. If you are not, look for the slanted tree with clearance to go underneath. Cut left until you go beneath this tree and head back onto Silver Streak. Either way you will end back on Silver Streak.

Now, when you approach the portion where White Lightening merges into Silver Streak look on skiers right for two wooden posts with a CAUTION sign. Take a few turns past the two posts around some tight trees and spot the entrance on skiers right into more glades. You will enter and make a sharp left to avoid a log. Continue on towards the trail between mid-station and The Drop, cross it, and head into the woods on the other side. This is a bike trail and it is fun. You'll come out at the merge of White-Out and Salamander.

Now, head over to The Drop. Immediately after the initial drop head into the trees on skiers left. Stay close to the trail, even when it becomes steep. Eventually you'll go to the right of several blowdowns and connect onto a narrow trail leading you back to Silver Streak. From here you can do the above-mentioned lower glades.

Now, head down Flag Spruce from Silver Queen towards OTW. There is a small entrance into the woods on skiers left before the entrance to OTW becomes visible. Take this and work the entire left-side glades of OTW, which are heavenly, but watch out on the tight entrance. Now, work across OTW towards the big dead (and broken) tree on skiers right. This has a large flat associated with it. Peer into former Cherry Bowl Glades. Pick your line and stay on the high side of the bowl for the best woods skiing of your life. You will come out at the bottom of OTW.

The woods between where Thunderstruck splits by the pumphouse on skiers left are also amazing, work your way towards Almost Heaven, cross Hiz, then work the trees to Herz, continute below Herz and into the woods staying to the left to come out by the water tower. You will need lots of snow for this.

I will not reveal the lines into upper Cherry Bowl... but let's say a little prayer (hint hint) they never get closed-off.

Finally, if you want a truely unique experience, pack-up a lunch and head to the top of the Thunderdraft lift. Take your board/skis off and hike the marked bike trail just behind the Ski Patrol hut. Continue on this trail working essentially off the backside of the mountain. Soon you will reach an open meadow with an amazing view of the southern valley. There's a picnic table (which may or may not have been jibbed ) where you can enjoy your snowy lunch and get in a few foot-access powder turns.

Enjoy!
tromano
March 15, 2005
Member since 12/19/2002 🔗
998 posts
Hehe nice post cannanman I am book markin this one for future refrence.
JR
March 15, 2005
Member since 01/1/2003 🔗
276 posts
Quote:

I will not reveal the lines into upper Cherry Bowl... but let's say a little prayer (hint hint) they never get closed-off.





Found it last year. Those were some of the tightest turns I've ever had to make but it was quite the heavenly exerience.
kwillg6
March 15, 2005
Member since 01/18/2005 🔗
2,034 posts
OH MY GOD!!!! You have given away at least half of the nicest tree runs on Herz Hill. Please Cannaanman, don't share the rest! The curse of the flatlanders will follow you forever if you do.
DCSki Sponsor: DCSki
johnfmh - DCSki Columnist
March 15, 2005
Member since 07/18/2001 🔗
1,926 posts
Nice!! Thanks for the tips.
lbotta - DCSki Supporter
March 15, 2005
Member since 10/18/1999 🔗
1,527 posts
You've made me go back to Tline. Appreciate the excellent tip...
canaanman
March 15, 2005
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
358 posts
Sooner or later the masses were going to find out anyways. The real question is if people here can handle the lines.

Trust me... I know way more spots than what is listed... i know of old trails and cliff drops... speak of them... nah, not until I get them on film.

And kwigili (sp?) I've found a line so far not a soul knows of. My secret. You only have to bike Timberline in the summer to know all the available lines on the hill.The way I see it... it's going to get people up to Timberline now that they know some great spots to hit. At least it will keep them preoccupied instead of hucking the pumphouse.

I may be in the land of Canaan this weekend... if I am, I may allow you to eat my dust on these lines.
Denis - DCSki Supporter
March 16, 2005
Member since 07/12/2004 🔗
2,221 posts
I've skied most of those woods and I must say that Whitegrass is better, because the deadfall has been cleared by volunteer work parties for years. I've done some of it. Timberline's woods are full of timber traps even with a lot of snow. At WG you can just aim and go with as little as a foot of snow. You don't have to worry (much) about hooking a tip under a buried log, or hitting a stump that was cut off too high.

You can argue that Tline's woods could be cleared in the same manner but then you run into the liability issue. This is the mid Atlantic. There are lots of wildly enthusiastic but relatively inexperienced skiers. Tline, and anybody else in this area, would have to be crazy to court the liability problems that would come with opening up their woods. I'm not talking about grossly over thinned glades like the former Cherry Bowl, I'm talking about northern VT type glades where you only cut saplings less than 1" in diameter and clear the deadfall. Actually northern VT has some badly overthinned glades too, many of the glades at Jay Peak for example. When resort management gets into it, the results are usually not what you want. You ski the woods for great snow and challenge. Opening the woods too much leads to lots of skiers in the woods and loss of both these features. The two best woods skiing mountains in the east, Mansfield (Stowe) and General Stark (Mad River Glen) got that way through the benign neglect of resort management and the dedication of individual backcountry skiers. Perhaps this is a lunatic fringe view, but - for what it's worth.
Roger Z
March 16, 2005
Member since 01/16/2004 🔗
2,181 posts
Denis, speaking of northern glades, I have a question for you.

There's a chance- at this point remote but realistic- that my next job will land me in New Hampshire. If that happens, I'm looking forward to being close to Maine and the White Mountains for skiing and hiking. I've been taking a particularly close look at Wildcat (New Hampshire's MRG) and they have some not-so-secret off-piste skiing as well as inbounds glades. Have you ever been to Wildcat and, if so, do you have any comments on their glade skiing? More generally, how is the glade and off-piste skiing in NH or ME if you have any knowledge of it?

This might be best to respond to in a new thread so as not to hijack this one- and if anyone else has any info I'd be glad to hear it!
JohnL
March 16, 2005
Member since 01/6/2000 🔗
3,518 posts
Quote:

Sooner or later the masses were going to find out anyways. The real question is if people here can handle the lines.





I don't think any "state secrets" were leaked. With the exception of the trail behind the Ski Patrol Hut (thanks on that one!), the other places are very obvious places for an experienced tree skier to poke around and explore. The exact lines in those places will vary from individual to individual.

For mountain biking, does Timberline provide a trail map to guide you during the summer?

Denis is spot on concerning the liability issues and the high degree of inexperienced sliders in the Mid-Atlantic. Fortunately, there is a much higher ratio of skilled sliders at Timberline than at most other Mid-Atlantic areas (Snowshoe in particular.)

As for glade maintance, mostly what is needed is the clearing out of the deadfall. Keep the saplings and brush in there to discourage inexperienced sliders. (There are risks when you slide in the trees.) For an experienced tree skier, the mentioned sections (and others) are not really that tight, you just have to worry about what's underneath the snow.

None of the lines mentioned by Canaanman should be attempted by anyone who can't easily handle Gladerunner. Gladerunner is a very, very easy section of trees to ski but I've never seen an abundance of people in there.

It doesn't take much traffic to ski out a section of woods, but I don't think we'll ever see a huge amount of sliders in the sections mentioned.
JohnL
March 16, 2005
Member since 01/6/2000 🔗
3,518 posts
Roger Z.,

Cannon may be better than Wildcat for glade skiing. Check out Rivercil's (sp?) posts on Epic and Snow Journal. He also has his own website (linked to from Snow Journal posts.)

I've skied 13 areas in Vermont, but have never skied New Hampshire. The main thing I know is that the White Mountains get less snow (in general) than the Green Mountains.
canaanman
March 16, 2005
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
358 posts
Uhh... believe me... lines I mentoned are nothing like GladeRunner in any shape or form. I'd say if you aren't comfortable with very quick and tight turns as you might experience in lower Pearly then you aren't prepared at all. And mind you, pretty much all of these don't have an easy exit.
Redman
March 16, 2005
Member since 03/15/2004 🔗
106 posts
Canaanman,
Are you a sponsored or team rider? By your posts it would seem that a rider with your level of experience/ability should be touring with the pros out West somewhere.
canaanman
March 16, 2005
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
358 posts
nope. Just a highschooler who's been riding for 10 years.

I wish... but college is pretty important compared to going pro.
bawalker
March 16, 2005
Member since 12/1/2003 🔗
1,547 posts
Canaanman, we need to hook up and I need to gain insight and learn to ride with someone who isn't a beginner anymore. All of my friends who ride now are beginners to advanced beginners refusing to go more than blues. I'm ready to tackle blacks and double blacks constantly, but learning to do so on my own is a tad difficult compared to having someone to hand out pointers etc.
jimmy
March 17, 2005
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
2,650 posts
I've been skiing in the valley 11 years now..learned at (really still learning i guess) Canaan Valley. Over those years I've seen a lot of good skiers and riders. One rider it seems I see every time i'm at CV, guy really is outstanding to the point of I can tell it's him from far away, I had to ask a patroller there who is this guy? Rides almost like a ghost, not on the snow but above it, like he was born on a board and lives in the woods. I've never met him but he's hard to miss.

Brad, if you want to follow someone's line, try Canaan Valley...this guy, you'll definitly know him when you see him.

jimmy
SCWVA
March 17, 2005
Member since 07/13/2004 🔗
1,051 posts
Quote:

Brad, if you want to follow someone's line, try Canaan Valley...this guy, you'll definitly know him when you see him.





Follow if you can!
jimmy
March 18, 2005
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
2,650 posts
You've tried?
SCWVA
March 28, 2005
Member since 07/13/2004 🔗
1,051 posts
I can't follow on my board, but can hang on my skis.

You should see the ghost man on a Mt. bike. He rides his bike like he was on a snowboard.
canaanman
April 3, 2005
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
358 posts
I ride my bike like a ghost... until I hit the top of a Crash n Burn, endo over a boulder and proceed to roll over every pebble all the way down...

T-line biking is pretty epic... if you don't mind the climb.
jimmy
January 23, 2008
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
2,650 posts
Bump due to recent interest \:\) .



 Originally Posted By: canaanman
...Okay, I'm very very reluctant to give out this information... but it is unjust for me not to.

When the snow is deep and soft and the woods are full of snow... head to Timberline. I'm about to tell you some of the most secret lines on the entire mountain (lines I, a 10 year local at Timberline just recently discovered).

Head up Silver Queen and after tower 13 keep your eyes peeled. You should see a slanted tree with enough height to go underneath on the left side of the trail and a few meteres upslope of it a downed tree trailside. Okay, when you get to tower 15 look to your left, far left. Right before Silver Streak steepens there is a tight woods entrance on skiers right (as you head down). Build up some speed and enter here. Pick your way through the tight scrub brush and small trees until the trail begins to open more. Now, look for the big blowndown trailside tree and head to the right before you reach it... in the pine trees. Shred all that powdery goodness. If you are up to it, continue down the trail and work your way to the upper connector between The Drop and Silver Streak. If you are not, look for the slanted tree with clearance to go underneath. Cut left until you go beneath this tree and head back onto Silver Streak. Either way you will end back on Silver Streak.

Now, when you approach the portion where White Lightening merges into Silver Streak look on skiers right for two wooden posts with a CAUTION sign. Take a few turns past the two posts around some tight trees and spot the entrance on skiers right into more glades. You will enter and make a sharp left to avoid a log. Continue on towards the trail between mid-station and The Drop, cross it, and head into the woods on the other side. This is a bike trail and it is fun. You'll come out at the merge of White-Out and Salamander.

Now, head over to The Drop. Immediately after the initial drop head into the trees on skiers left. Stay close to the trail, even when it becomes steep. Eventually you'll go to the right of several blowdowns and connect onto a narrow trail leading you back to Silver Streak. From here you can do the above-mentioned lower glades.

Now, head down Flag Spruce from Silver Queen towards OTW. There is a small entrance into the woods on skiers left before the entrance to OTW becomes visible. Take this and work the entire left-side glades of OTW, which are heavenly, but watch out on the tight entrance. Now, work across OTW towards the big dead (and broken) tree on skiers right. This has a large flat associated with it. Peer into former Cherry Bowl Glades. Pick your line and stay on the high side of the bowl for the best woods skiing of your life. You will come out at the bottom of OTW.

The woods between where Thunderstruck splits by the pumphouse on skiers left are also amazing, work your way towards Almost Heaven, cross Hiz, then work the trees to Herz, continute below Herz and into the woods staying to the left to come out by the water tower. You will need lots of snow for this.

I will not reveal the lines into upper Cherry Bowl... but let's say a little prayer (hint hint) they never get closed-off.

Finally, if you want a truely unique experience, pack-up a lunch and head to the top of the Thunderdraft lift. Take your board/skis off and hike the marked bike trail just behind the Ski Patrol hut. Continue on this trail working essentially off the backside of the mountain. Soon you will reach an open meadow with an amazing view of the southern valley. There's a picnic table (which may or may not have been jibbed <img src="/ubbthreads22/images/graemlins/smirk.gif" alt="" />) where you can enjoy your snowy lunch and get in a few foot-access powder turns.

Enjoy!
JohnL
January 23, 2008
Member since 01/6/2000 🔗
3,518 posts
Jimmy,

Ullr will not be pleased.
tromano
January 23, 2008
Member since 12/19/2002 🔗
998 posts
I blame Cannanman. What ever happened to him anyway?

He has a pretty sweet website. http://www.frostlinefilms.com/
Bumps
January 23, 2008
Member since 12/29/2004 🔗
538 posts
Funny, I was just thinking of this post a few days ago. I printed it out some time ago, but haven't really gone looking yet. maybe this weekend if we get the whie stuff.
tgd
January 24, 2008
Member since 07/15/2004 🔗
585 posts
 Originally Posted By: tromano
I blame Cannanman. What ever happened to him anyway?


I believe he grew up and went off to college somewhere in the Pac NW.
jimmy
May 27, 2009
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
2,650 posts
Upper Almost Everything.
Denis - DCSki Supporter
May 28, 2009
Member since 07/12/2004 🔗
2,221 posts
Originally Posted By: Roger Z
Denis, speaking of northern glades, I have a question for you.

There's a chance- at this point remote but realistic- that my next job will land me in New Hampshire. If that happens, I'm looking forward to being close to Maine and the White Mountains for skiing and hiking. I've been taking a particularly close look at Wildcat (New Hampshire's MRG) and they have some not-so-secret off-piste skiing as well as inbounds glades. Have you ever been to Wildcat and, if so, do you have any comments on their glade skiing? More generally, how is the glade and off-piste skiing in NH or ME if you have any knowledge of it?

This might be best to respond to in a new thread so as not to hijack this one- and if anyone else has any info I'd be glad to hear it!


Glad to see this thread bumped after several years. Sorry that I did not see this inquiry before. Yes, I've skied Wildcat when I was a 5 days per year college kid and a menace to everyone on the hill, especially myself. With apologies, I cannot say anything about their woods, since I never skied them and to my knowledge little if any woods skiing was done in those days. Bark eating is a growing phenomenon that first began to take off in the 1980s.

Wildcat can be very good, but being directly across the notch from Mt. Washington, it can also be brutal. I can recall getting out of the gondola top station and crawling upwind on all fours on boilerplate ice to reach the slope and put on skis. Then I started downhill on the steepest run and was held suspended by the battle between wind and gravity for 30 seconds until the gust died down a bit and I could move slowly downhill. In that part of the world, Saddleback Maine is supposed to have some great nearby backcountry, but alas I've never been there. Friends who have gone recently really like it.

I see Roger that you chose Kansas skiing over NH. grin
scootertig
May 28, 2009
Member since 02/19/2006 🔗
365 posts
I have never ventured into the backcountry at Saddleback, and have only skied there once (it didn't work out last season, but I'd planned a return trip).

I love it. It was one of my best days on skis. I hear they're adding a TON of new gladed terrain over the next few years, and that they're seriously going over the title of "best advanced terrain in the East". I don't know if they have much in the way of gnarly pitch, or anything like that, but the tree skiing alone may be enough to put them on the map in a major way.

In a selfish way, I almost hope it doesn't work, because I don't want to see that place overrun...


aaron
SCWVA
May 28, 2009
Member since 07/13/2004 🔗
1,051 posts
Denis,

You still heading up to Tuckermans this month? I'v been dreaming/thinking about it.

Yesterday, I popped up to Boston for a meeting. People asked me if I was spending the night or heading back to DC after the meeting. I told them I was heading back, because I hadn't brought my skis. grin The looks were priceless.

jimmy - Canaanman isn't around, but the ghost man still is.
Denis - DCSki Supporter
May 29, 2009
Member since 07/12/2004 🔗
2,221 posts
I was at Mt. Wash. last Thurs./Fri. skiing the summit snowfields. I have been slow in reporting because I'd like to get some pictures posted. Tucks is about gone according to all reports, but I didn't go there to see for myself. I took the auto rd. to the summit. The summit snowfields will not last long but Airplane Gully, in the great gulf, was in great shape and should be good for another 2-4 weeks. I didn't ski it but watched as my nephew did. Pics to be posted.
jimmy
May 29, 2009
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
2,650 posts
Originally Posted By: SCWVA


jimmy - Canaanman isn't around, but the ghost man still is.




Funny how things go. This thread goes back to 2005 and none of us knew each other except as names on the internet. Four years later and many of us have at least made turns together. We've shared houses, wives, gone on road trips and skied some pretty cool places together. Lot's of friends on this thread.









Just kidding about the wives, just wanted to see if any one was paying attention.
JimK - DCSki Columnist
May 30, 2009
Member since 01/14/2004 🔗
2,723 posts
In the Pallavicini section of Arapahoe Basin ski area there is a trail that Vince skied this April called David's Run. Check first picture link below. It is the first narrow trail/line through the woods to the looker's right of 38 degree Pali Face. Pali Face is the wide open bump run descending from top ridgeline in center-right portion of photo. In May of 2005 a man named David Conway died in this section of the mountain from the first fatal inbounds avalanche at a US ski area since 1975. They renamed the run after him. Second link is the detailed forest service report on the incident. Since that time they no longer allow skiing in the Pallavicini trail pod (~1300' vert) after May 1 due to avalanche concerns associated with unstable spring snowpack on steep terrain.

http://www.snowjournal.com/images/gallery_snowjournal/4a2163e55c33e.jpg

http://www.fs.fed.us/r2/news/2005/09/Factual_Report_pgs_1-37_and_report.pdf

By the way, that is some terrific info from Canaanman that Jimmy dragged up. I wish I had it with me when I visited Tline in Jan 2009.
DCSki Sponsor: DCSki

Ski and Tell

Speak truth to powder.

Join the conversation by logging in.

Don't have an account? Create one here.

0.14 seconds