So Who Has Been Hit on the Slopes?
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JohnL
February 22, 2005
Member since 01/6/2000 🔗
3,518 posts
I'll admit to being amazed at how many DCSki posters report being hit by another slider when on the slopes. In numerous decades of skiing, this has never happend to me. Knock. Knock. Off the top of my head, I can only recall one close call.

I'm curious as to some of the details of the collisions. What slope where you on? Where you stationary or moving? How crowded was the slope? Did you have any indication that you were about to be hit? What sort of injury did you suffer?
JR
February 22, 2005
Member since 01/1/2003 🔗
276 posts
I have one close call and one minor collision.

I ran into one of my friends one time on Wisp Trail. We were both newbies and going pretty slow. He cut in front of me, I ran into him, and we both fell forward. My shins cut into his board as we hit the ground but other than that it was no big deal.

The close call was at Snowshoe on the Basin side. 3 teens were standing on the side of one of the fairly narrow trails. I went to the right of them and one of them started to go across the trail without looking uphill first. I had to slam the breaks and ran over the front of her skies. Her friend yelled out "Ski In Control". I wanted so bad to stop, get off my board, climb back up there and thrash him with it as I politely told the girl that cut me off to check uphill before starting out but I didn't. There's nothing more infuriating than being called out for something when they were actually in the wrong.

I've seen quite a few close calls and some really bad looking collisions from the lift so they definitely happen pretty frequently around here.
warren
February 22, 2005
Member since 07/31/2003 🔗
485 posts
John,
Well, At Canaan this last weekend, my daughter and I were skiing with her friend. Her friend is very much a beginner therefore, we were on Timber (Trail/Run?). I was almost on the hill-side to the left waiting for her friend to catch up when I hear a Whoa! from behind and a guy who had no conecpt of control went between me and the hill-side As he passed by, his arms were flailing around (with his poles turned into a weapon ) Later that same day (on the same trail), my daughter's friend had fallen and was in the process of getting up when another out of control skier almost plowed into the back of her!! I told my daughter that's why we stay off of the greens, they're too dangerous

-Warren-
queenoftheslopes
February 22, 2005
Member since 11/15/2004 🔗
143 posts
I skiied for 12 years and never hit anyone or got hit by another skiier. I started skiing again last year, and in these two seasons I have been hit three times!

So, obviously I have this past weekend. I was on the Tyrol slope making pretty wide, fast turns. I got hit from behind with no warning at all. I am pretty sore, but no major injuries.

Last month at Whitetail, I go cut off by a snowboarder. He cut right in front of me and sat down. I hit his board and flew over him. He was really apologetic, and kept telling me how bad he felt for cutting me off. I was taking a lesson, and when the instructor was trying to make sure I was OK and figure out what happened, he again said how sorry he was and that he cut me off. I did end up with a huge bruise on my leg and knee that lasted about 3 weeks.

The third time was last season. I was standing well to the side of the slope on Gunner, and this little kid (probobly 8 or 9) comes tearing down the slope in a tuck, skis over the backs of my skis and bindings, and knockes me clear our of my skis.

I think something has changed, because I never had anything like this happen to me before.
DCSki Sponsor: Canaan Valley Resort
VolklYokel
February 22, 2005
Member since 02/20/2005 🔗
14 posts
I too have never been hit on the slopes, but I've seen it happen to others.

About three weeks ago I saw a poor woman coming down Snow Park (the long, green run, at the left at Whitetail) get nailed by a youth somewhere between 15 and 17 years of age. It was a blatant hammering from behind and this woman never saw what was coming. She was making nice gentle sweeping turns, and she was very predictable in where she was and with where she was going to be.

My partner and I skiied over to her and assisted her in getting it all back together. She was mildly dazed, but we ascertained that she was fine. As we helped her up, I asked whether that young person apologized. She said he did; otherwise, I was ready to chase him down and get his ticket clipped, because he didn't even hang around to help her.

What I learned is that between the novices falling all over the place and the ying-yangs hammering people from above, even a green run can turn to black on a busy Saturday. It was dangerous out there that day.
shearer519
February 22, 2005
Member since 07/12/2004 🔗
149 posts
Last year when I was hit while taking a snowboarding lesson at tussey mountain. We were going down the main slope working on our edging so we were making wide turns. Next thing I know some kid who tucked the entire slope goes over the back of my board and we both take a hard fall. Well the kid got up and apologized right away so there were no hard feelings there.

The main problem is slope overcrowding. Somedays I find the greens at Seven Springs harder then the blacks. But really I don't know what can be done to make these runs safe. They are going to be crowded in beginners are going to fall right in front of you. It's a fact of life. However there need to be more enforcement on the advance skiers that striagt line slopes. When crowded this is extremely dangerous.
Roger Z
February 22, 2005
Member since 01/16/2004 🔗
2,181 posts
I've been smashed twice, both from behind, both when I was a kid. Once was at Gore Mountain in upstate New York when I was 5. My dad followed the guy down the mountain and got his ticket revoked. The second time was when I was 8, on Boulder Run at Wisp. Another guy plowed into me from behind, hitting me hard enough to snap my ski in half. Being a kid, though, I was okay- I don't think anyone under 12 has bones, just rubbery cartilege.

Since then, I've had two near collisions. One was on the beginner trail at Roundtop when a six year old almost plowed me over while I was trying to teach my girlfriend to ski. I chewed him out to his parents, which didn't seem to do any good. The second time I was at the SIDE OF THE TRAIL (few years back, think it was at Whitetail) and someone almost ran into me there.

I think part of the reason I've avoided problems as of late is because I'm skiing less and less on crowded days and less and less on the east coast as it is. Double diamonds out west are usually sparsely populated and subject to a completely different set of risks. Also I do whatever I can to avoid crowded trails and- when on a crowded trail- waiting for pockets and openings to occur to start skiing. When none of that is possible, I try to ski with the pace of the crowd in general, which can be difficult sometimes. Basically I behave in crowded conditions just like I drive in crowded conditions. The idea isn't to get rid of the risk entirely (you can't) but reduce it to the lowest level possible.

Having said all that, watch me get clobbered or, worse, clobber someone, next week when I go to Snowshoe or CV...
kennedy
February 22, 2005
Member since 12/8/2001 🔗
792 posts
I've been taken out and done some taking out in my day. Sometimes it's someone not paying attention, sometimes you're in their blind spot sometimes it's malicious. I've seen people stick out ski poles to take out boarders. It's extremely rare but very nasty.

I've done taking out where someone is in my blind spot, where someone cuts my line suddenly or where I've lost an edge on ice and skidded into people. Usually I'll put myself in danger trying not to take out others.

I've seen some cringeworthy stuff in my time too. I remember when I was learning in Andorra and we decided to practice getting airs. So the instructor took us to this little roller and let us take turns trying to launch it. One of the guy's went and before he had time to take off and land his buddy decided to follow. The first guy goes and of course falls, his dumb ass friend is right behind him and lands on top of him. Pretty stupid. I've seen this stuff happen a lot though. You set your line to hit a kicker in the park and just before the final run some idiot decides to kind of trundle up the side onto the landing area. At best you abort in time to completely miss the jump and ream them a new one for being idiots, at worst you are already in the air and end up decapitating someone.
MadMonk
February 22, 2005
Member since 12/27/2004 🔗
235 posts
I got hit for the first time in Utah. It was right in front of the Pay Day lift at Park City and some beginner just ran into me. Didn't hurt me at all as I probably had at least 120 lbs on her and she was very apologetic.

Now my brother got laid out by a boarder at Snowshoe on Widowmaker a couple of years ago. The dude didn't even stop and apologize. We caught up w/ him and the guy started yelling that we were in his line (i.e. straight line). My brother told him to apologize or get punched. The guy told my brother to "f" off. The guy got punched and shut up.
Crush
February 22, 2005
Member since 03/21/2004 🔗
1,026 posts
ummm dude .... that is why I don't ski at PCMR .... it is basically for loosers. Lame terrain and too many a-holes and people who can't ski or racer-wannabes ... my advice? Never go there. What were you thinking!!!!!!
canaanman
February 22, 2005
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
358 posts
Been hit... several times. Of course... I almost decimated about 4 people a few years ago at Timberline. Hit the third kicker and people were lining up for some rollers on the LANDING of it... it's amazing how expletives 10 feet up in the air move people like lightning. I don't know how I landed betweeen the people... but Lady Luck was showing all her pearly whites that day.

Generally speaking, I don't hit people... I hit trees. And that's the honest truth.
skier219
February 22, 2005
Member since 01/8/2005 🔗
1,318 posts
Quote:

ummm dude .... that is why I don't ski at PCMR .... it is basically for loosers. Lame terrain and too many a-holes and people who can't ski or racer-wannabes ...




You mean like every ski area in the Mid-A?? I'd take Park City any day over the bunny hills and redneck skiers down here!!

There are definitely some dangerous out of control skiers here in the Mid-A, and I rarely see ski patrol clamping down. When I patrolled in Vermont, we clipped tickets whenever we saw someone skiing out of control. Clipping half a ticket was the first warning, and usually sufficed.

Craig
SkiBumMSP
February 22, 2005
Member since 12/8/2004 🔗
224 posts
Oh, I've had my instances of skier-vs-skier situations (warning, this is a long one!).

First one that I can remember was at the very tiny ski area up in Treasure Lake in PA, where I pretty much learned how to ski. (all of two very small slopes and a T-bar lift - maybe 250 feet of vertical, if we were lucky - don't know if it still operates, though. If it does not, I'll have to see if I can get a write-up on it on the "lost" ski areas section, but I digress....).

Anyway, I was sking down into the T-bar lift when one of my friends cut me off. We ended up wiping-out into each other. I twisted a knee in the process...

Fast forward some 15 years (plus or minus a couple) and I was skiing down Paradice at Massanutten. Some kid darted out from the side of the trail right into my path. Oh $#!+! Jammed on those edges hard, but still clipped the back of the kid's skis. Caused my ski to release and I ended up in a full yard sale. Kid is now sitting in the middle of the trail bawling and I trying to get myself back together to see if he was alright. Kid's dad skis up (and I am thinking, "oh great, he is probably going to give me grief for running his kid over"), and starts to apologizing to me saying he should've checked up-slope before letting his kid go and so forth. I was just concerned the kid was alright, and fortunatly, he was.

I had a near-miss just two weeks ago at Brekenridge, CO. I was skiing down into the Independance chair at the base of Peak 7. I had a straight shot at the empty lift line, only to have some snowboarder cut me off right at the last minute. I jammed on the brakes, but still not enough room to avoid hitting the sign-post. Fortunatly, the sign/fence-post is one of those same types of poles used for setting up solalom gates on race coures. I basically bounced off the sign-post, launched over the dude's board and landed square on my skis on the other side of that dude. Kinda wish I had a video, to be honost! Of course, he started giving me $#!+ in saying "What part of "slow" don't you understand" type crap. I told him I was going slow, but you f'ing cut me off! My friend that I was sking with was like "Geezus! What the hell was that?" The liftie basically told the both of us to cool it and told me to be more careful next time.

I've had numerous near misses in making bump runs, mostly due to people cutting into my line and then wiping out right in my path (Happened to me on lower Shay's Revenge at Snowshoe a couple years back, for instance). It is not easy to pull-up hard while in bumps, especially steep ones.

And a real beauty just this past Sunday at Massanutten:

While riding up the lift, I watched some lady, who was completely out of control, do a spectacular full-on yard-sale on Rebel Yell right at Mid-station. She skidded a good 75 feet (and damn near took out three other people in the process). I got off at mid-station to go check on her (and there also happen to be a patrolman right there at the slow-sign immediatly above the mid-station ramp). No sooner did I get off the lift when I started hearing people yelling from the lift "SLOW DOWN!!!", only to look up hill and see some dude just torpedo the slow-sign! And guess where I was standed? Yup, immediatly below that slow-sign! I immediatly jammed my poles into the ground and just lauched myself forward and watched has this guy skidded just past the back of my skis, only to cut the skis out from under some poor kid that just got off the lift behind me. Both he and the kid then tumbled down into some woman that was standing just downhill from there. I also managed to catch that patrolman also bail at the last minute to avoid getting nailed himself.

Well, the patrolman skied down to check on the man, the kid and that woman, whom all of which, were thankfully, okay (when that guy hit the slow-sign, it was enough to slow him down to avoid any nasty injuries). Meanwhile, I skied down to that first women, who was just starting to walk up to get her equipment to find out if she was okay. The mountain host skied up to me and asked if I had my red marker on me, as I had every intention to mark her ticket with a warning for skiing out of control like that. However, I was not on duty (I was only free-skiing in my regular "civilian" jacket, until I came on duty later that afternoon). I know, though, that when that patrolman that was up there already was done with that guy, he was going to come down to that first lady that did the full yard sale.

However, this is where it gets better. The patrol director saw the whole thing form the lift and by the time he came down, ohhh maaaan, was he HOT!. Oh, I don't think I've ever seen him that fired-up before. To make a long story short - well, that was two tickets that got yanked right there! Turned out that lady that yard-saled and that guy that torpedoed mid-station were a married couple. The patrol director was so pissed tht he took away thier equipment (it was rental equipment) and made them walk the rest of the way down the hill! I don't blame him, as I've never witnessed such a blaten display of complete out-of-control skiing. And it was also revealed to me later that day that those two people have been warned at least two other times about thier out-of-control skiing.

Now as to the comments about more enforcement needed. Believe me, I know at least the patrol at Massanutten tries to do everything within thier power to curtail that kind of behaviour. It is not always easy to catch them, as often, by the time we can get a chance to react, they are already at the bottom and lost in the crowd. The patrol often tries to do "speed control" by posting somewhere along the side and watch for these clowns (kinda like a cop sitting at the side of the road looking for speeders).

And finally, just yesterday (Monday/Pres. Day), a snowboarder who was going too fast through that area where Paradice and Diamond Jim merges and leads to the base of Lift 6, took out some kid right there at the base of the lift. That ticket was marked with a warning (although tempted to yank it).
TLaHaye
February 22, 2005
Member since 02/9/2005 🔗
136 posts
I've been hit three times this season, two of consequence. First time, I was overtaken by a boarder, who nailed me pretty well. I was linking turns down the side of the slope (Devils Elbow at Wintergreen). I read the clown that hit me the riot act (probably a 15 year old or so) but was assured it was my fault as I interfered with his line. No damage was done, but luckily, I was turning into the slope when he hit me. Had I been turning into the trees, my mass would likely have forced him off he slope and into the trees at pretty high speed.

Second time was again at Wintergreen, in the middle of a slope, and an out-of-control 13 year old on skate skis nailed me from behind/the side. This one caused some bruising. It was only a blue square (top of Eagles Swoop, the Devils Gate side), but this kid was way out of his depth.

What bothers me with both of these hits is that I ski fairly fast. If anything, the Ski Patrol asks me to slow down. Last season, they closed a slope my son and I were skiing on for "safety". It was solidly frozen mashed potatoes, and was dangerous, but we were the only fools crazy enough to be skiing it (we were having a blast).

I've posted here previously of my youngest, who at 4, was hit by a boarder hard enough that he was knocked out of his poles and mittens. They were left 20 feet uphill of where he finally landed. As someone else mentioned, stick with the diamonds ... they're generally safer.
JohnL
February 22, 2005
Member since 01/6/2000 🔗
3,518 posts
I guess that's why they call it the "Slow Sign." If you hit it, you'll be going slower.
canaanman
February 22, 2005
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
358 posts
Ahhh yes... I remember when I hit a Ski Patroller at Snowshoe. Was her fault...

School ski trip on a Sunday... last run of the day, heading to the bottom of Widowmaker to get back up to Top of the World. I'm screaming down into the downhill lift line... don't even bother stopping and unstrapping. The Patrolless (female patroller) was checking tickets and she stepped-out right infront of me... there was nothing I could do... I didn't have any room to stop. With my arms full extended and locked I hit her square in the shoulder and rocketed her across to the other side of the lift area. She quickly got up and smiled and apologized for not paying attention.

I thought my ticket was gone.
RobertW
February 22, 2005
Member since 10/14/2004 🔗
199 posts
I have been very lucky, no real collisions. However, I have had someone run into me while teaching my daughter. It was on Fawn Lane at 7 Springs. I was behind her running interference while she was practicing her wedge turns. Over my shoulder I see some scrawny teenager straight-lining toward us not-too-fast but definitely out of control. I'm 230, and an ex-hockey player who was somewhat adept at checking (if nothing else) and I'm quite solid on my skis. I settle in behind my daughter, hoping he is going to miss us. As the point of no return approaches, I get my shoulder down and Bang, this kid hits me and bounces off me like I was a brick wall. I think he saw the look in my eyes and didn't stop apologizing until I skied away, with my daughter again in front.

A friend of my brother did not survive a collision with a tree. It happened in '85 or '86 somwhere in Virginia. The circumstances are somewhat murky as everyone was too upset at the time and stories conflicted (my brother was not there).
SkiBumMSP
February 22, 2005
Member since 12/8/2004 🔗
224 posts
Quote:

Ahhh yes... I remember when I hit a Ski Patroller at Snowshoe. Was her fault...




That reminds of the minor run-in with a patroller at Seven Springs just this past Christmas weekend.

Riding up the high-speed 6-pack, some young lady that was on the chair ahead of mine fell down while getting off - right in the path of where I needed to get off. I went around her, only to end up hooking skis with a patroller that was getting off and making towards the patrol shack at the top there. We pretty much rode side-by-side, holding on to each other until we got slow enough to unhook the skis. Fortunatly she did see that I was trying to avoid a fallen skier.

I also had one minor instance where I was sking along the cross trail going from Geronimo to the base of Lift 5 at Rebel yell. Just as I was passing through where Pacesetter crosses into the Easy Street terrain park, a snowboarder decided to pick that moment to start down into the terrain park. Only, he ended going right into me. I pretty much grabbed a hold of him and punched out a wedge-turn into the terrain park where we both stopped (was not easy with his board up against my skis, but fortunatly we both were going pretty slow), at which point I let go of him. I told him to be more carful the next time and to watch for cross-traffic before starting downhill. He probably thought his ticket was gone, since I was in uniform and on duty as a patrolman when that happened.
Ullr
February 23, 2005
Member since 11/27/2004 🔗
531 posts
I have never hit anyone or been hit. I have been skiing for a little over 30 years. I have a question for all of you.....................

When you were hit (or doing the hitting) was it on a weekday or weekend?

kwillg6
February 23, 2005
Member since 01/18/2005 🔗
2,034 posts
Either being the missle or the target on the slopes is a preventable event. The majority of collisions are by out of control skiers/boarders who, for whatever reason, feel they can exceed their ability regardless of terrain. I have been fortunate in that I have not been injured by out of control skiers/boarders. Had equipment damaged, clothing ruined, but no blood or guts. Others have not been so fortunate. When in Europe, I was amazed that although they skied fast, collisions were non-existent. Perhaps it's the "laws" and the consequences of being in a colllision with another person on the slopes that acts as a deterent, I don't know. We need to do a better job controlling our own actions while enjoying the sport. If a skier/boarder has a collision, it is generally due to going too fast in a given area with the factors of conditions, crowds, and skill level as considerations. Just like driving a car, you slow down in traffic, poor conditions, or when there is an "impared operator" close by. Why should our sport be any different? Yes, everyone needs to learn how to control their turns while going fast, but common sence dictates that we do it where others are not at risk. Sorry about the sermon....but I feel that collisions are caused by inexperience, inability, or lack of using the gray matter that god gave us.
Roger Z
February 23, 2005
Member since 01/16/2004 🔗
2,181 posts
Don't get too excited about Europe just yet Kwillg. I recall a couple years ago they had a number of on-slope fatalities from collisions over there. Perhaps they've shaped their policies up since then but it sure seemed better to get hit here than there that winter.

A common theme in these threads when people take you out is that you were "in their line." Trying not to be cynical, is there anything in the rulebooks about your line giving you the right of way in a slope? I don't think there is- which reminds me that the closest I ever came to nailing someone was a beginner in a mogul field who suddenly cut into my line. I was able to turn and avoid her but if I had hit her, it would have been my fault. As Canaanman could probably attest, even when you're not on a crowded slope, sometimes things (like trees) come into your "line," and that doesn't give you the magical ability to just ski through them.
tromano
February 23, 2005
Member since 12/19/2002 🔗
998 posts
"You were 'in their line.'" This is usally jsut code for get out of my way. I don't brake for nobody.

However you are supposed to yeild to skiers already on the trail when you merge on or start from a hault. So they may have a point. I am not realyl sure if that rule means any time you are changing traisl as marked on the map or anytime you ar changing between distinctive lines on the trail. For example if a piste has groomed on the right side and bumps on the left in the same run is that considered two different trails. Whatabout northface slope at 7S, there are trees and snow guns seperating the sectiosn of the trail is that 3 different traisl? Just food for thought...
MadMonk
February 23, 2005
Member since 12/27/2004 🔗
235 posts
Crush,

PCMR isn't that bad. I'll grant the the stuff off of several of the lifts (Payday, KingCon) is pretty lame but I really enjoyed the skiing off of Thayer and Motherload as well as Blue Slip and McConkey's. The next time I come out though I really want to try Solitude and Snowbasin.
warren
February 23, 2005
Member since 07/31/2003 🔗
485 posts
Monk,
If you go over to Solitude, you gotta make it over to Honeycomb Canyon! There's a line for everyone's taste
-Warren-
Roger Z
February 23, 2005
Member since 01/16/2004 🔗
2,181 posts
I'll ditto that- Honeycomb rocks!

Good point about lines, too. Guess it comes down to how far away a skier or rider is and what that person considers to be his/her line: the whole slope, or the immediate 25-75 feet below them? There's a point when you've got to acknowledge that your line is subject to sudden shifts, just like there's a point where other people have to acknowledge your line. Tough to call where the break is on that.
JR
February 23, 2005
Member since 01/1/2003 🔗
276 posts
Quote:

A common theme in these threads when people take you out is that you were "in their line." Trying not to be cynical, is there anything in the rulebooks about your line giving you the right of way in a slope? I don't think there is- which reminds me that the closest I ever came to nailing someone was a beginner in a mogul field who suddenly cut into my line. I was able to turn and avoid her but if I had hit her, it would have been my fault. As Canaanman could probably attest, even when you're not on a crowded slope, sometimes things (like trees) come into your "line," and that doesn't give you the magical ability to just ski through them.




I think this is the biggest misconception among out of control boarders/skiers. They see someone in front of them and if they cut over towards them they "cut into their line". They don't realize that skiers in front of you have the right of way, basically because they can't see you but you can see them. People need to approach another skier knowing that they can either keep with a current pattern or decide to cut straight across the trail. While cutting straight across the trail may be anoying, they still have the right of way. You have to approach someone prepared for the worst and in a position where you can avoid them if they cut over (I know this isn't always possible). More poeple need to give a courteous "Left Side" or "Right Side" yell so they know you're there.

Another problem is that some people know some of the code but not all. Like when I mentioned earlier about a girl that was stopped jutting out straight accross the trail in front of me. You do have the right of way if you are "skiing" downhill from another but if you are stopped, uphill traffic has the right of way. Alot of people don't realize that I think.

At the risk of being terribly uncool, I don't think people should listen to music on a busy day on the slopes. I realize it probably makes a good run even better but on a busy day its just flat out dangerous. I can't count the number of times I've saved my tail from a collision/near miss just by hearing someone carving on my blind side or someone giving a courtesy yell.
BushwackerinPA
February 23, 2005
Member since 12/9/2004 🔗
649 posts
I got hit for the first time pretty hard and it was partial my fault, i normal ski with high edge angle carves and coming down to the quad at Hidden Valley i was turning to the right and boarder was turn to the left into his backside, we were going the same speed. we hit pretty hard but i stayed on my feet(175lb of pure muscle i guess) the guy got was pissed off, said i was horriable skier and i tried to apolize for carrying accros the hill so much he iddnt want ot here any of it.
kwillg6
February 23, 2005
Member since 01/18/2005 🔗
2,034 posts
RogerZ, you make a point, one that I didn't. All we hear about are the fatalities, not the severe injuries that occur at a much greater rate than the few and far between collision deaths. The point I was trying to make, however, is that we can control the circumstances under which we ski and therefore should be able to avoid situations where we would be involved in a collision. When the hill becomes too crowded, I hang the boards up and get a beverage of my choice rather than becomming a target for out of control scuds. Or, I go where the crowds are less likely to ski such as bump runs, etc... As I read what is written in this thread, I realize that most of us are good enough skiers/boarders to avoid collision and therefor injury. It's the 2-3 time a year skiers who head to the top for a bomb run before the end of the day who are the problem for us and themselves. Remember misery is optional!
SkiBumMSP
February 23, 2005
Member since 12/8/2004 🔗
224 posts
Quote:

You have to approach someone prepared for the worst and in a position where you can avoid them if they cut over (I know this isn't always possible). More poeple need to give a courteous "Left Side" or "Right Side" yell so they know you're there.




You beat me to it! I could not of said it better myself. I often find myself yelling out to somebody I am about to over-take "On your Right/Left/Behind you", etc. Especially on some of the narrower cat-walks like that is found out west. Giving those courteous "left side" yells is just decent slope etiquette, which should be followed by everyone.

Quote:

Another problem is that some people know some of the code but not all. Like when I mentioned earlier about a girl that was stopped jutting out straight accross the trail in front of me. You do have the right of way if you are "skiing" downhill from another but if you are stopped, uphill traffic has the right of way. Alot of people don't realize that I think.




Exactly, and that was precisly what happened when that kid darted out right in front of me on Paradice all those years ago. I did not even see him until I came around that one dog-leg. That also brings up another related point that some people don't realize. If you must stop on the trail, try to do so off to the side and in a spot where you can be seen from up above. Pretty darn annoying to come over a head wall, only to find somebody stopped immediatly below where I did not see them (all the more reason why I often slow down now when approaching the top of head walls, to get a chance to look down before committing). Now, granted, wipeouts/mishaps can, and do, happen in some of the most inoppurtune places, and we, as skiers, must be prepared for the rare, but inevitable. But still, even in the event of a wipeout, if possible (and not injured), try to clear out as quickly as possible so that somebody else does not hit you and now we got an even bigger problem.

Quote:

At the risk of being terribly uncool, I don't think people should listen to music on a busy day on the slopes. I realize it probably makes a good run even better but on a busy day its just flat out dangerous. I can't count the number of times I've saved my tail from a collision/near miss just by hearing someone carving on my blind side or someone giving a courtesy yell.




I also agree here. In this day-in-age of the cool little MP3 players and the like, the temptation is sometimes there to crankup some kick-@$$ power-prog metal and rip to it, though. But, like you said, I want to be able to hear what is going on around me and be able to react accordingly. I often take skiing as seriously as driving my car, especially when similiar speeds can be reached. Even while driving, yes I do like to crank up some tunes on the radio, but not at the expense of not being able to hear what is going on around me (plus, I think it is against the law to listen to headphones while driving anyway). Also, I believe some ski areas does not allow headphone listening while skiing anyway. If you are seen wearing a pair, you may be asked to remove them.
TLaHaye
February 23, 2005
Member since 02/9/2005 🔗
136 posts
Quote:

"You were 'in their line.'" This is usally jsut code for get out of my way. I don't brake for nobody.




Don't brake, or can't? You are absolutely right, that the downhill skier/rider, if moving, always has the right of way. The concept of interfering with someone's "line" causing a collision is bullcrap. That said, I get annoyed like anyone else when someone interferes with my line. Regardless, I know that it's my responsibility to break my line and avoid the downhill skier. That responsibility extends to passing them without causing them to panic.

This almost deserves a new topic, but how many people make it a habit to stop and render assistance to a rider who's fallen, and left a stream of equipment strewn across the slope, or worse yet, been injured? I am incredibly proud of my eleven year old, who just seems to get this behavior instinctively. He always stops to help, stand guard uphill of an injury while someone summons help, or mark a slope hazard until the patrol can set some poles up. These are all simple things to do, and can save the fallen a lot of grief. The golden rule is still golden.
Crush
February 23, 2005
Member since 03/21/2004 🔗
1,026 posts
LOL I have my own system of avoiding collisions LOL...
jimmy
February 24, 2005
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
2,650 posts
http://www.dcski.com/ubbthreads22/showfl...part=1&vc=1

TLH Check this out re:slope courtesy.

jimmy
tromano
February 24, 2005
Member since 12/19/2002 🔗
998 posts
Quote:

LOL I have my own system of avoiding collisions LOL...




Go fast and neeeeveeer stop?
Swimmer
February 24, 2005
Member since 02/3/2005 🔗
143 posts
Got nailed pretty hard at Snowshoe last year. I was just keeping to the far left edge on some blue groomer, just cruising along. My course probably wasn't more than 15 feet wide as I was working on short quick turns. Out of the corner of my eye I see a mass of blue colored human come barreling off the far right side of the run at a high rate of speed. I have just enough time to hunker down a bit and put my arms up in front of my face.

I'm not svelt...6 foot, 230 pounds, but I got knocked a good ten feet from where I was at. After a quick systems check to make sure I wasn't broken, I crawled over to the other person to check on them. Busted nose, snapped poles, shattered goggles, maybe a cracked rib (they couldn't breath) and a knee that's gonna bother them for awhile. I felt bad as it was a woman into her 50's.

Witnessed placed her as out of control and moving fast. They said that when collision was about to happen she just sorta opened up her body out of shock I guess.

Ski patrol took notes, I sat in the office for a few minutes while they took personal details. She got a ride to the hospital. Nothing came of it towards me, but I still feel bad because it really messed her up. On the other hand, she failed to maintain control.

Steve
catskills
February 24, 2005
Member since 06/29/2004 🔗
53 posts
I got hit 14 years ago by the center of the local High School football team. He was doing 50+MPH and I was doing about 20 MPH. Both of us were expert skiers. We were both pretty much going straight down the fall line with no big turns. He and I were the only skiers on this medium width trail. He decided to ski rather close to me when he passed me and just lost it a tad right before he was going to pass. I went unconscious and still do not remember what happened. I spent a week in the hospital with 3 skull fractures and 4 broken ribs. I also had a lot of road rash (snow rash) where the skin on my face was rubbed off sliding across the snow unconscious. I woke up on the slope with no clue how I got there and why I hurt real bad. I was not allowed to drive for 5 weeks. He tore a number of ligaments in shoulder. I was extremely nervous about skiing the following year.
Denis - DCSki Supporter
February 25, 2005
Member since 07/12/2004 🔗
2,227 posts
Quote:

I'll admit to being amazed at how many DCSki posters report being hit by another slider when on the slopes. In numerous decades of skiing, this has never happend to me. Knock. Knock. Off the top of my head, I can only recall one close call.

I'm curious as to some of the details of the collisions. What slope where you on? Where you stationary or moving? How crowded was the slope? Did you have any indication that you were about to be hit? What sort of injury did you suffer?




I too did not get hit for many years. Then I started telemarking in the late 80s and began to get hit often. I'd see it coming and try to get out of the way and adjust for the impact so I was not hurt, nor were the other parties. The reason was obvious, as an inexperienced and learning telemarker I used most of the width of the slope in wide looping turns, and I was going slow. Many many people do not (clueless) or will not (rude) slow down or make any attempt to avoid the less skilled and the learners on the slopes. This was on green and blue slopes. It doesn't matter what snow sliding tool you are on, this will happen to you if you make wide slow turns. People should not be hitting you of course; you are in the right and they are in the wrong. But who wants to be right but hurt. It's a tough problem especially in an area with millions of people and relatively little ski acreage to put them on.

Once I got to skiing faster and more in the fall line this stopped. Then when I started snowboarding the same thing again. By the way I have been hit more far more often by skiers while snowboarding than the other way around. Often middle aged skiers will chastise a snowboarder because they feel threatened by the noise the board makes when the rider stops to _avoid_ them. This is lame to begin with, but it always tickles me to see their baffled looks when they notice my gray hair.

In summary we all just have to be courteous and careful out there, follow the code, and try to anticipate.
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