Corridor H Update
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SCWVA
January 25, 2005
Member since 07/13/2004 🔗
1,051 posts
I went under the two new bridges yesterday on Rt55. They had a couple of more beams to set on the McCauley bridge and all the steel and pans were set on the bridge closest to Wardensville. The actual paved highway looked like they were almost complete. You could actually see the new signs along the road.

Does anybody know when they are scheduled to open up this section?

Have they poured the bridge deck on the bridge closest to Wardensville?

Have they made much progress with all the warm weather this winter? Hopefully, someone has benefited from this friggin warm weather!

BAWALKER or anyone else have any updates?
Bumps
January 25, 2005
Member since 12/29/2004 🔗
538 posts
Looks like summer 2005. here's the web site. http://www.wvcorridorh.com/
bawalker
January 26, 2005
Member since 12/1/2003 🔗
1,547 posts
There's a snowballs chance in h*ll that the Wardensville Corridor H section will be open by summer 2005. Crews haven't even touched the Wardensville/Rt55/259/Trout Run interchange in nearly a year. In fact it was decided just this month on how they want to design and impliment an interchange so it won't be till summer 2005 before that exit is started.

As for the other updates.

- McCauley Bridge has had 4 more girders installed since November but that has been it. I talked with a steel worker at the bridges back in December and he told me they are having issues with the steel bending and curving too much so that is severely slowing and hampering work. In fact EVERY PIECE of steel in those two bridges has a curve and bend to it. This bridge will be so curved that there will be a 6' high embankment on the bridge to allow vehicles to carry a 65mph drive. Fears are that this curve and embankment is so extreme that rainy and cold weather will cause massive accidents on the bridge. Drive with EXTREME CAUTION. And that comes from a steel worker at the bridge.

- Highway/Informational/Reflective signs and posts have been posted on all the finished stretches of CH. This includes painted lines as well.

- Lost River Sinks Bridges do have their concrete roadway base finished. Crews are now working on getting the molds and rebar in place for the retaining walls for the bridges. This should be done by spring.

- No other news on the Wardensville to Baker stretch as the rest is completely finished.

- Moorefield to Foreman stretch is under full construction now with the Stage 1 earth moving from East Moorefield Exit (currently open exit) to the West Moorefield Exit. For those of you who travel to TL/Canaan you all are missing some of the new sights. Make a right at the stop light and go down towards McDonalds and the Walmart area and you'll see where the new massive 'trumpet' shaped interchange is going to be right beside McDonalds and the new bridges will be beside the South Branch Inn.

More pictures to come soon.
tromano
January 26, 2005
Member since 12/19/2002 🔗
998 posts
Quote:

- McCauley Bridge has had 4 more girders installed since November but that has been it. I talked with a steel worker at the bridges back in December and he told me they are having issues with the steel bending and curving too much so that is severely slowing and hampering work. In fact EVERY PIECE of steel in those two bridges has a curve and bend to it. This bridge will be so curved that there will be a 6' high embankment on the bridge to allow vehicles to carry a 65mph drive. Fears are that this curve and embankment is so extreme that rainy and cold weather will cause massive accidents on the bridge. Drive with EXTREME CAUTION. And that comes from a steel worker at the bridge.





I love this quote. Every single piece of the bridge is irregular. They have to radically redesign the structure to accomodate this, making the bridge totlaly unsafe i the process but they continue as if nothing is wrong.... The solution is adding a wall.
gatkinso
January 26, 2005
Member since 01/25/2002 🔗
316 posts
Quote:

This bridge will be so curved that there will be a 6' high embankment on the bridge to allow vehicles to carry a 65mph drive. Fears are that this curve and embankment is so extreme that rainy and cold weather




Sounds fun! I can hardly wait to hit that little bit of excitement before the slopes!
bawalker
January 26, 2005
Member since 12/1/2003 🔗
1,547 posts
Actually you have it a bit backwards.

Back in the 90's when opposition groups were opposed to Corridor-H they did everything in their power to block, hamper, restrict, and slow down the process. One of these things was that they had the Rudy House placed on the national historic register meaning no government agency can ever condem, touch, or remove that property. You will recognize the Rudy House as the white one tucked back into the side of the mountain as you go underneath the McCauley bridges and around the turn at Hanging Rock.

Well this was actually a major victory for the opposition groups because this forced engineers to move the location of the bridge. Previously the road would have came off of Pine Ridge in a long straight pattern only slightly curving to the right (when looking towards Baker) and having two bridges that were fairly straight and low. This also would have demolished Hanging Rock at McCauley too.

Anyway when the Rudy House was added to the historic registry engineers had already started aquiring land, permits, etc. So the design of the highway was so far into development that to halt the process over this now historic piece of property would have costed hundreds of millions. Rather what engineers did was create an 'S' turn in the road. When you come off of Pine Ridge now the road starts bearing to the left gradually for about 1.5-2 miles before arriving at the bridges. Then when you arrive at the bridge, you will immediately bear a hard right while on the bridges and continue bearing right after you get on land on the other side. So in affect the McCauley Bridges are the end result of engineers not saying "Wait we have a problem, the road needs to move or something but we shouldn't continue at this rate."

Now... The bridge is so much on a curve itself that the 12' steel girders are made with bends in them. So much so that every girder going into place has a curvature/bend to it by design. But what was happening recently is the steel was having a tendency to bend more than it should after it was put in place. This was due in part to all the girders not being attached to one another so it was trying to roll itself into more of a curve. There was a fear back in Nov. that this could possibly cause a bridge collapse during construction.

For now though, work is very slow and tedious and it would surprise me if they started even getting the metal sheets and rebar in place to get ready for concrete before May. meaning it would be Dec 2005 at the EARLIEST before this section of highway will open.

Sorry folks, but blame high up politicians pushing a project along for the sake of having it without giving it complete thought. Namely Robert C Byrd.

One day I shall have his spot inthe senate and declare a national ski day.
wvrocks
January 26, 2005
Member since 11/9/2004 🔗
262 posts
In reality a 6' difference isn't that horrible. Just about any bridge in a curve on a high speed roadway has some super elevation in it. That means one side is higher than the other. So from the center of the bridge to the parapet wall (guardrail) it drops 3 feet. On a bridge that size, the lanes are most likely 12 feet wide, possibly 16, with an 8 foot shoulder. Worst case, that makes it a 3' drop in about 20'. The other lane raises the same amount. Significant but not really extreme. You drive on stuff like this all the time on interstates. Its just hard to see at speed. If it wasn't there you would have a lot harder time keeping you car on the road and they wouldn't drain very well.
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