Ski Tune
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10 users
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janej
October 8, 2004
Member since 09/20/2004
42 posts
I got my used skis from Ski Chalet last year. Only used it for four days last season. Do I need to get it tuned before the season? Which type of tune? I found Tune 1-4 and A-B on their web site. I only go on the green, and I am very confortable with the greens now. I probably will stay on the greens this year since my 5 year old is with me all the time.

Many thanks for your advice,

Jane
Crush
October 8, 2004
Member since 03/21/2004
995 posts
Were the skis tuned last season? If not, get 'em run through the stone grinder (like a Wintersteiger) to level the base and bevel/sharpen edges, and get a good wax job.

If not .... just get a wax job .... or even learn to do it yourself it's not hard sort of like ironing a shirt!
PhysicsMan
October 8, 2004
Member since 11/20/2001
218 posts
Quote:

Were the skis tuned last season? If not, get 'em run through the stone grinder (like a Wintersteiger) to level the base and bevel/sharpen edges, and get a good wax job.

If not .... just get a wax job .... or even learn to do it yourself it's not hard sort of like ironing a shirt!




Since she admittedly doesn't have enough experience to judge for herself whether work is needed, and if it is, what type of work, the first step should be for a ski tech to have a look at her skis to make this determination.

For all we know, the skis were tuned nicely before she bought them. If that's the case, unless the 4 days she put on them last year were over rocks, she won't need a base grind. It would be a waste of money. In addition, too frequent stone grinding shortens the useful life of the ski.

Take them back to Ski Chalet and ask for their opinion. They have all the work they can handle, so they are not going to recommend work which is not needed.

If you use their Gaithersburg store, John Beltrachi is their head tech and is one of those not-in-the limelight sort of guys that is extremely knowledgable, helpful and fair. Tell him "Physics Man" sent you.

Tom / PM

PS - You can't wax too often, and once a year certainly isn't too often, so at minimum the tech will likely recommend this.
janej
October 8, 2004
Member since 09/20/2004
42 posts
Thanks for the advice. I usually go to the Tysons store but found the Gaithersburg store to be very close to my office. I will bring my stuff in to get them checked out next week.
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johnfmh - DCSki Columnist
October 8, 2004
Member since 07/18/2001
1,914 posts
I agree with Physicsman on asking a tech for advice. However, I truly doubt her edges will need sharpening after just 4 days. If the tech recommends a sharpening, I'd ask for a second opinion. The fewer times you sharpen those edges, the longer the skis will last.

Also, it's too late now but skis should be waxed at the end of the season to preserve the base over the summer. A hand wax is the best bet. To save $, I usually have my skis hand waxed at the Timberline Lodge--very affordable. Making sure skis are properly waxed is like checking tire inflation on a car or bike--it can really affect performance.
Crush
October 8, 2004
Member since 03/21/2004
995 posts
Jane - Take 'em to whatever ski shop is closest it will be just fine. They will give you good advice.

DUDES - You aren't listening or paying attention; I asked if the skis had been tuned *last season* and if so just wax 'em.

If she bought them from Ski Chalet they may be from a swap or maybe no and then they might be a consignment sale in all cases Ski Chalet just racks 'em and puts a tag on it. Whatever ... if they have not been tuned when purchased you guys are good enough to know the bases may have a wave, may be railed etc and you also know that beginners love to slip and slide especially on mid-atlantic hardpack that chews up edges and takes 'em down plus the hard stuff takes out the structure given time.... if they have not been tuned last season when purchased. And you guys are also good enough to know that a ski with a well-prep'd running surface will pivot easy with rotary and skid smoothly/progressively ... a bonus to beginners/intermediates.

And c'mon .... even if you run 'em through a stone grinder every year (actually I do that ... sometimes twice a year or use a base-planer a few times a season) they'll last waaaay over 6 years at which time one *should* think about getting new equipment. The average American gets a new car that often why not skis LOL?
janej
October 12, 2004
Member since 09/20/2004
42 posts
I took all the skis to the Alpine ski shop this weekend. I was told I should bring in the boots also to check the binding. They also charge a fee ($12?) to check the binding. I am going to 7 springs for Christmas. As part of my package, I can get my ski check every night for free. Should I still pay to check the binding? It actually only cost $15 for me to rent the skis for 3 nights this time. I do not want to pay much more to use my own.

One more question. I found that my little one can use his brother's ski this year. What do I need to do to get the skis fit for him?
comprex
October 12, 2004
Member since 04/11/2003
1,326 posts
JaneJ, are you sure that they will do a binding release check on each ski every night for free? That seems like an absolute mort of work for the techs (they're not just doing your skis) and I suspect that there are a lot of things that could be meant by 'ski check' including:
- visual inspection by the ski tech, not at all the same thing as a binding release check.
- storage of your skis at the mountain, much like 'coat check'

Even if 'free ski check' actually means 'free binding release check' (I DOUBT IT VERY MUCH), that $12 means your ACL/knee is probably safe on the first day.

My suggested strategy would be:
A) get your skis checked by the shop. You won't just ski those 3 days, will you? It is to your advantage to do this before the tech has to do 30 pairs per evening.
B) rent skis for the little one until he gets boots.
C) Put both of yourselves in (probably separate) lessons. Think of it as investment in his future (So he doesn't have to date snowboarder girls ) and you trying to keep up with him.
janej
October 13, 2004
Member since 09/20/2004
42 posts
Comprex, now that you mentioned all these possible meanings. I pulled out my brochure and it reads "Complimentary Overnight Ski Check". It is now sounds like checking in skis? Thanks for the suggestion. I will bring my skis back to Ski Chalet.


Taking lessons is a different story. My 5 year old was terified by his private instrutor last year at Timberline. The first thing he did was taking him to that the lift to the top. Now he started crying whenever I mention the possiblity of a lesson. He kept saying he just want to be with me. I think we will end up taking the same lesson this year to get him over the fear.
snowcone
October 13, 2004
Member since 09/27/2002
589 posts
Concerning your child and fear of instructors:

May I suggest a couple of things that might help your youngster get over his fear?

First of all I assume you live in the Beltway. If you do, you have access to a rather unique program available at Liberty Mountain called "Ski with Me". This program is private lessons specifically tailored for parent and child to ski together with an instructor. Go to ... http://www.skiliberty.com/clc.htm ... and scroll down to the "Ski with Me" for information.

After your child feels more comfortable you might want to enroll him in group lessons with other kids his age. Most children do really well in group lessons and end up having a lot of fun. I know Snowshoe has half day programs specifically aimed at very young skiers and perhaps Seven Springs does too. You might ask to be connected to the ski school and ask if they have any programs comparable with that of Snowshoe (Snowshoe program ... http://snowshoemtn.com/kidsworld.html )

Good luck!
The Colonel - DCSki Supporter
October 13, 2004
Member since 03/5/2004
3,062 posts
I tried to reply to your post last night but for some reason I could not log on. Anyway, the free ski check means that you can check your skis at either the ski check in the ski lodge, or at the ski check room under the hotel entrance. You can also check your skis during lunch, etc...a real convenience. Seven Springs can get crowded, and their green terrain is somewhat limited, either relatively narrow twisting trails on the front side, or a much better lift served area on the far side of the North Face, but you have to hike a little to get to it, unless you are willing to ski on a blue to get to the green.
Seven Springs always has a lot to do for all of the family, allthough their hot tubs are exceedingly inconvenient, outside, and you have to pay to use them.
The Colonel
janej
October 14, 2004
Member since 09/20/2004
42 posts
Hummm, I am looking at the trail map now and it looks like the mail lodge is pretty close to Lift 1, the Front face. It is all green. It is not as good as the North Face? The north face would be a long hike.

Thanks,

Jane
comprex
October 14, 2004
Member since 04/11/2003
1,326 posts
JaneJ, if the snow cover is good, you shouldn't have any trouble at all in _traversing_ over to the mildly sloped side of North Face and back again. It really pays to avoid the crowds.

There are shuttles that run around the base area and parking lots too.
janej
October 14, 2004
Member since 09/20/2004
42 posts
Thanks a lot for the tip. We will get over to the North Face when it gets crowded.
Roy
October 18, 2004
Member since 01/11/2000
609 posts
I agree with snowcone. I did many private lessons with youngsters that were 4-6 years old and I can only think of two that the parent got their money's worth. And that was only because the kids were already exceptional skiers.

The other kids had not skied much here I am, a big adult that is not their parent and it is a little intimidating. Especially because we've taught most kids not to talk to strangers, especially if they approach you in a ski mask! (I didn't have the mask on but you get the picture)

If you are an accomplished skier (intermediate and comfortable on most blues), the ski with me is an excellent choice to help bring your little one back to lessons. I've had kids like this before and spent almost the whole lesson teaching the parent how to teach their kid. By the end of the lesson, the kid had warmed up to me and I was able to do a one on one lesson. Also, with Ski with Me, you get some intruction for yourself.

After the kid warms up to lessons again, put them in group lessons with kids their age. Peer pressure works wonders in improving most kids skiing.
janej
October 18, 2004
Member since 09/20/2004
42 posts
Roy,

That is so interesting to know. I always thought it is just my boy being shy. I just checked the Liberty web site and found they offered a lot more for kids 4-8 than what I've seen anywhere else. I have taken my kids to Massenuten(sp?), White tail, Cannan and Timberline. The only thing these places offer for kids under 6 or 8 is private lesson or camp. I will try to convince my husband to go to Liberty instead of Whitetail this year.

Thanks a lot for your suggestion.

Jane
Denis - DCSki Supporter
October 18, 2004
Member since 07/12/2004
2,170 posts
I started both my kids in a program at Roundtop that involved a half day of ski lesson and a half day of day care. Perhaps a little less than a half day each, but substantial. It has been 25 yrs. so my memory may not be entirely accurate. They both are now excellent skiers. My daughter became a college racer and is now the mother of 3 little boys in VT. The boys take a season long all day one day per weekend program at Mad River and are getting good very fast. My son is a steep freak. He lives in Chicago but will join me anywhere on relatively short notice to ski. Both kids could leave me in the dust if they wanted to but they don't; they remember those years when I wiped their tears and lugged their stuff from the parking lot like a packhorse.

Have fun as a ski parent. There are great rewards.
Roy
October 19, 2004
Member since 01/11/2000
609 posts
Jane I'm glad my suggestion was a good one for you.

I think Liberty has some great programs for kids. Including a separate area for kids to learn to ski. We even keep all adults out of the area (including parents). This area opens up typically in January once there has been cold enough temps to cover the whole mountain.

This is great as it protects the kids from uncontrolled new skiers and allows us as instructors to relax a little (because we're not so nervous of those uncontrolled skiers) and have more fun teaching the kids.

Liberty only requires private lessons for kids 3 years old (and we will not teach younger). From 4-8 years old, they must go to our Children's Learning Center.
SpringsRegular
October 20, 2004
Member since 10/14/2004
153 posts
Jane,

Not sure if I understoof your question, but I just want to clarify the the "free" ski check at Seven Springs is a location that you leave your ski's over night next to the slopes so that you do no need to carry them back to your room. They will not do any safety checks. Also check out http://www.7springs.com/winter_lessons.shtml#tinytots. Seven Springs has a great learn to ski program for kids.
Tiny Tots

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