Ski Weekend: Blue Knob vs. WV
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TBONE
January 20, 2003
Member since 01/20/2003 🔗
15 posts
Hi there,

Blue knob is one of the most challenging mountains in the area. It is relatively cheap and rarely crowded. Unfortunately,, they only have one green trail that goes from top to bottom, and there are maybe two - three other blue sections (Jack Rabbit, Upper RT 66 and Upper High Hopes) that are easy enough for beginers to be comfortable. Deer Run and Expressway would challenge most beginers IMO. I have never ented at BK and I haven't take any lessons there, but I am sure that any ski school can provide beginer's lessons.

I know that Snowshoe, WV for example has much more green beginer terrain, but I can't offer any specifit endorsement since I have never been there myself. It is much more expensive than blue knob. HTH.

snowcone
January 20, 2003
Member since 09/27/2002 🔗
589 posts
Hi!

I've skied at both Blue Knob and Snowshoe. I have skied both Blue Knob and Snowshoe as a beginner. Blue Knob was a harrowing experience as a beginner 2 seasons ago, but I love it there now. Given the choice, if I had to learn to ski again, I would prefer Snowshoe. It has a greater range of trails for beginners and a really decent ski school. Snowshoe is not cheap, it more of a destination resort than a lets-go-skiing weekend. If less expensive is a primary criteria then Timberline might suite you better. I have not skied there yet but I hear very nice things about the resort and hope to get there before the end of this season.

(Anonymous)
January 21, 2003
I'm a DC local, although I grew up in New England, and learned to ski there. I'm trying to plan a weekend trip with some friends to a ski place. Blue Knob looks a bit more economical, but I'm looking for advice on distance and trail variety. I haven't been there or anywhere in WV, though have heard the mtns in WV are a bit bigger.
I'll be going with beginners, for the most part, and I'm not looking for anything fancy, but larger than Ski Liberty (the only place around here I've skied). Any advice out there? (Or another suggestion all together?)

Thanks

Roy
January 22, 2003
Member since 01/11/2000 🔗
609 posts
I agree with both replies. The Knob does not have many beginner trails but is cheaper. Snowshoe has lots of beginner trails and can be expensive.

It also depends on what you want to do. If you want to hang out with your friends and watch TV, well that's about all you can do at BK. Snowshoe has more variety of nightlife.

If you want more to do at night at want economical, Wintergreen may be an alternative. It's pretty economical as there are many cheaper hotels nearby. Plus it near Charlottesville so there's more to do at night.

canaanman
January 27, 2003
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
358 posts
Never thought I would actually suggest this, but Timberline may be your best bet. Sure... they don't have high speed quads or great nightlife, but they do have reasonable prices for lodging and, although the ticket prices are about that of Snowshoe's and the food not so great (and expensive), you might find what you like there. Timberline does offer the 2 mile-long beginner trail Salamander, and has expert, advanced, and intermediate trails that take advantage of all of the whopping 1,000 feet of vertical. Plus, you can send your beginner friends down Salamander, shoot down the Drop or Off-The-Wall (and if its your last day, *cough*Cherry Bowl*cough*) and get some amazing bump and powder skiing in (as well as some tree skiing, if you catch my drift). You can show-off underneath the lifts on Silver Streak and Thunderdraft (both which have monsterous moguls right now), or take a nice cruiser down White Lightning or Thunderstruck. If your friends do improve, you may be able to coach them and give tips on Dew Drop and Almost Heaven, and if catching air is your thing, head over to the park (which is still icy, might I add).
Not to mention, people get a kick out of hearing how you got evacuated off a chairlift 40 feet above the ground (or maybe like, 80 if you can stretch the truth). Im not sure you can really go wrong with Timberline... but hey, its an experience. Give it a try.


(Note: canaanman does not advise the skiing/snowboarding of marked and closed areas. Do so at your own risk.)

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