CO Skier Numbers Down
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johnfmh - DCSki Columnist
June 13, 2004
Member since 07/18/2001
1,914 posts
Skier visits in CO declined by 3% during the 03-04 season. Why? Warm weather!

http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/business/article/0,1299,DRMN_4_2955158,00.html
JohnL
June 14, 2004
Member since 01/6/2000
3,509 posts
The Eastern Rockies have had two straight below par snow seasons. Not good for skiing and not good for preventing wildfires.

I lucked out this past March. It snowed most days during my week-long trip to the Aspen areas.
Crush
June 14, 2004
Member since 03/21/2004
994 posts
... FYI .... LOL! RECORD SKI VISITS IN UT IN 65 YEAR HISTORY!!!!
Author: Nathan Rafferty (nato@skiutah.com)
Release Date: Mon. May 03, 2004

Mother Nature, Marketing Efforts Catalyst for 7 Percent Increase
SALT LAKE CITY, Utah (May 3, 2004) – Ski Utah, the marketing arm of the Utah Ski Association, today reported that the state's 13 ski areas saw a record number of skier days during the 2003-04 winter season (the National Ski Areas Association defines skier days as one person visiting a ski area for all or any part of a day or night for the purpose of skiing or snowboarding). Official numbers totaled 3,386,141 for the season ending May, 2004.

Early and consistent snowfall throughout the season, combined with increased marketing efforts and resort infrastructure improvements, fueled the busiest season in Utah's 65-year skiing history.

"While Mother Nature certainly provided great snow conditions, the dollars spent on advertising and resort improvements made the difference this year," said Ski Utah President Kip Pitou. "We're known for having consistent and exceptional snow quality, so having great ski conditions doesn't have the impact one might expect. Leading up to the Olympics Utah resorts spent over $250 million dollars in resort improvements. Everything from new chairlifts and snowmaking equipment to improved base lodges and daycare facilities – all geared toward improving the ski and snowboard experience for years to come. We're finally seeing those investments pay off."

Total skier days for the 2003-04 ski and snowboard season totaled 3,386,141, a 7 percent increase over last season and 3 percent better than 2000-01, Utah's previous record season. Utah's Summit County ski areas (Deer Valley Resort, Park City Mountain Resort and The Canyons Resort) saw a combined record for the second year in a row with visits totaling 1,418,345, a 5 percent gain over last year. Total skier days for the past 10 years are as follows:

Season ... Skier Days ... Rank
2003-04 ...3,386,141... 1
2002-03... 3,141,212... 3
2001-02 ...2,984,574... 8
2000-01 ...3,278,291... 2
1999-00 ...2,959,778... 9
1998-99 ... 3,095,347... 6
1997-98... 3,101,735... 5
1996-97... 3,042,767... 7
1995-96... 2,954,690... 10
1994-95... 3,113,072... 4

Utah's official ski season continues through Memorial Day, May 31, at Snowbird Ski & Summer Resort where skiers and riders are currently enjoying a 95-inch base. Summer operations at many other Utah resorts begin as early as Friday, May 21.

For interview opportunities with Ski Utah President Kip Pitou, please contact Nathan Rafferty at (801) 534-1779. Information on Utah's 13 mountain resorts can be found at www.skiutah.com.
JohnL
June 14, 2004
Member since 01/6/2000
3,509 posts
Interesting how the skier days declined during the year of the Olympics.

What state besides Colorado was ahead of Utah in 02-03? California? Vermont?
andy
June 14, 2004
Member since 03/6/2004
175 posts
The NE had a very cold period this winter that slowed things down but regrouped & actually came out ahead.I read that NH had a very good year.NH is the closest thing to the rockies on the east coast.(scenery)
johnfmh - DCSki Columnist
June 15, 2004
Member since 07/18/2001
1,914 posts
ski_guy_59
June 15, 2004
Member since 11/9/2001
221 posts
I think the cost of a Vail lift ticket also has something to do with the decline in numbers. When the economy slows down, more and more people become hard pressed to pay $72 for a lift ticket. Additionally, when the snow is rocking on the east coast, why bother flying to CO?
Scott - DCSki Editor
June 16, 2004
Member since 10/10/1999
1,091 posts
According to the laws of supply and demand, if demand (e.g., for a Vail lift ticket) goes down, then the price should eventually go down too. A decline in skier visits isn't a very healthy thing for the industry, but it could be healthy for consumers who are frustrated that tickets have gotten that high in price. On the other hand, skier visit numbers can fluctuate wildly from year to year based on conditions, so it takes many years of data to know if there's a trend one way or another.
johnfmh - DCSki Columnist
June 16, 2004
Member since 07/18/2001
1,914 posts
Vail has high day ticket rates to discourage day trippers from Denver. It focuses instead on destination skiers who ski 3-7 days. Those skiers get reduced rate tickets via ski and stay packages. Also, Vail offers excellent deals on season passes.
johnfmh - DCSki Columnist
June 16, 2004
Member since 07/18/2001
1,914 posts
ski_guy_59
June 16, 2004
Member since 11/9/2001
221 posts
In essence they do the same type of marketing as Snowshoe. That makes sense, the resort can profit much more from overnight guests than daytrippers.
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