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jonnie
August 28, 2006
Member since 08/28/2006 🔗
3 posts
I have been a frequent viewer and now am I making my first post. Here it goes....

I am planning on buying new skis for this season. I have it pretty well narrowed down to what I want. I am considering getting either a pair of Fischer RX8's or Fischer AMC 76's. I was wanting opinions on which one would suit me better. I am an advanced (but not expert) skier, that is not afraid of any terrain (steeps, moguls, whales, etc..). I am looking for the best ski for me to use here in the mid-atlantic area. My main concern about the RX8 is that it has too much of a "race" design to it for my liking. My main concern about the AMC 76 is the bigger waist. Would 76mm waist be too big for skiing in this area on a normal basis (although it would make powder days nice, is it really worth it for the few we have)?? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Also any suggestions about other skis that you believe would be good choices for me would be appreciated too. Thanks!!!
tromano
August 28, 2006
Member since 12/19/2002 🔗
998 posts
Fischer has some nice skis. However first we will need more info on your ski technique and prefrences. Do you carve your turns? Do you make long and short carves? Are you looking to improve onpiste carving or do you want to learn bump and develop other ungroomed skills? Another thing would be if you travel to ski, what conditions are like there.
jonnie
August 28, 2006
Member since 08/28/2006 🔗
3 posts
Most of my time skiing groomed runs is spent making short carved turns.

Quote:

Are you looking to improve onpiste carving or do you want to learn bump and develop other ungroomed skills?




As far as that goes I would like to develop my bump and ungroomed skiing more, but I don't want a ski that takes a whole lot away from the onpiste/groomed carving. Also, I will do most if not all of my skiing here in the mid-atlantic area.

I have only bought one pair of skis in my life (just an entry pair), so I am not to familiar on what exactly I am looking for. I have a few friends that praise Fischer skis a whole lot and also have read nothing but good reviews about these 2 skis.
JohnL
August 28, 2006
Member since 01/6/2000 🔗
3,518 posts
Both skis are certainly good skis for the Mid-Atlantic; it really depends on a skier's ability and fitness levels, terrain preferences, weight, where they ski (say Whitetail versus Liberty versus Timberline), etc. If possible, demo the two skis (in the correct length.) You may spend a few more dollars for a ski if you buy mid-season, but at least you'll be confident that you've bought the best pair for you.

Quote:

Most of my time skiing groomed runs is spent making short carved turns.





Only going by that one statement, the RX-8 is probably the better ski of those two choices for you right now.
tromano
August 28, 2006
Member since 12/19/2002 🔗
998 posts
I have skied the BigStix7.6 which is the precursor to the amc76 but with a longer turn profile. The 7.6 is a very light snappy ski becuase of its graphite core and was a fine carver as well. The AMC should improve on that tradition wiht a more progresive side cut and shorter turn radius (an improvement for midatlantic trails). Both fischers should hold an edge very well on groomed, however the RX8 will probablly be better on really hard conditions. I would say that for your goald the RX8 might be a better fit. Trying different skis and seeing which you like will also be a benefit to you are moving to an expert level ski from an intermediate level ski.
comprex
August 28, 2006
Member since 04/11/2003 🔗
1,326 posts

I would demo some of the Head iXRC series as well.
snowsmith - DCSki Supporter
August 28, 2006
Member since 03/15/2004 🔗
1,367 posts
I like the Head skis also, however, I have some Head Monsters ( I think IM 75's) which I find to be very versitile and a very lively ski. I have never tried any Fisher skis so I can't comment on them. However, I agree with the other folks who say do a demo and try several different brands/types. I actually have two pairs 1) Head Monsters and 2) K2 Axis X. I use the K2s for deep snow and the Heads for ice and steeps. It's nice to have 2 to choose from and it is fun to compare the performance of the two. I bought my K2s new but I bought my Head Monsters very slightly used on EBAY for $250. The seller indicated that they had only been used once and they looked nearly new. So maybe get one of the Fisher skis for one kind of skiing (say moguls) and another ski for groomed or powder or whatever.
jonnie
August 29, 2006
Member since 08/28/2006 🔗
3 posts
Another question.....I am about 5'10" tall and weigh right at 170lbs. What (or where can I find) size recommendation would guys give me that fits me best. Right now I am skiing 170's and I am comfortable on them but would a smaller ski be a better fit for me???
comprex
August 29, 2006
Member since 04/11/2003 🔗
1,326 posts

Depends on the model. We can sort of tell you which ones to grab for demo first, but it's really up to you beyond that. When grabbing
slalom-derived skis (less than 14m turn radius) try 160 cm-ish
powder boards with large turn radius try 175-185cm (more if twin tip)
skicross/GS/technical/mogul (turn radius 16-25m) 168-175cm (more if twin tip).

Do not take the number printed on the ski as being a firm guide as to what you "should" be on. My "177cm" Volkls are actually 9cm longer than my "175cm" Elans because Volkl measures the contact patch and Elan measures the entire length of the ski base including tip & tail.
rmcva
August 29, 2006
Member since 01/28/2004 🔗
187 posts
Good advice by the others. To give my example, I'm 5'7", weigh 185, ski mostly local, any trails, and usually ski somewhere every week. I'm very pleased with my skis which are 107/70/97 x 177. They do excellent on our groomed/hard pack and pretty good when we get a powder day. The key - keep them tuned and waxed.
comprex
August 30, 2006
Member since 04/11/2003 🔗
1,326 posts

Bandit X?
snowsmith - DCSki Supporter
August 30, 2006
Member since 03/15/2004 🔗
1,367 posts
I am 5'9" and 190 lbs. My K2's are 180s and my Heads are 170s. Manufacturer's continue to make skis that are skied at very short lenghts compared to the old pencil ski days.
rmcva
August 30, 2006
Member since 01/28/2004 🔗
187 posts
Yes - '03 Bandit X
The Colonel - DCSki Supporter
August 30, 2006
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
3,107 posts
Jonnie,
Welcome to DC Ski! I noticed you did not indicate your age or location when you "joined" DCSki.
I have been skiing since I was 29, or about 36 years.
My suggestion would be to go to a good local ski shop (DCSkiers will readily jump in here with their opinons)and talk to the techs about your ability, where you ski, what you want in a ski and boots, etc. Also read the equipment guides in the ski magazines. Armed with all this info go to a demo day at one of the local resorts...SNOWSHOE usually has a big one in early/mid December. Talk to the reps and tell them how you ski and what you want to accomplish with a new ski. Then demo several manufacturers skis and various types of ski styles...all mountain, hard pack, quick turns or GS long turns, etc.
I know that when I last went to a demo I was amazed at how differently the various new model skis actually skied on the snow. Some highly rated skis I literally could not ski/control. Others were great. Then the next time I went skiing I rented several demo skis based on what I had experienced at the demo day. Then I bought and have been happy with my Volant PowerKarves ever since. Yes, length and width are important, but making sure you get a ski that fits your style is the most important factor. And your style will change for the better if you pick the right ski, especially if you then take a lesson or two.
Hope this helps,
The Colonel
fb
September 21, 2006
Member since 03/16/2006 🔗
68 posts
didnt read the entire post so dont know if this was already suggested- if youre not dying to buy a pair immediately, check the mid atlantic resort websites and zero in on the demo days. call the manufacturers and ask that they have reps on mountain for u to try the goods u are interested in. research em like crazy, but nothing beats your own test drive!

if that doesnt work, snowshoe has the mac (mountain adventure center), which carries higher end rental skis that u may be looking at, about $50/day.
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