Where has all the snow gone? Asia!
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bawalker
January 7, 2006
Member since 12/1/2003 🔗
1,547 posts
David
January 7, 2006
Member since 06/28/2004 🔗
2,444 posts
That's crazy. I would gladly take the snowfall, but -45 degree temperatures just don't sound too fun. By the way...Where has the snow gone? Is there any forcasted in the next 10 days??
fishnski
January 8, 2006
Member since 03/27/2005 🔗
3,530 posts
1st frost in 70 years at New Delhi,India. We need some of that cold to work its way over the pole in our direction!End of Jan & feb could be Interesting.
Mountain Masher
January 8, 2006
Member since 03/13/2004 🔗
541 posts
Unfortunately, the Northern branch of the Jet Stream that affects the mid-Atlantic seems to be locked in a SUMMER-like pattern these days (leaving most of the arctic air up in Canada). During a normal Winter, we usually experience a few prolonged periods when the Jet Stream takes a nice dip and keeps much of the mid-Atlantic in a deep freeze. And, in fact, we did experience Winter weather and good ski conditions from late Nov. thru late Dec.

Of course, Global Warming has also taken it's toll. The size of the arctic air mass that forms each Winter has gotten smaller in recent times making it harder for the cold air to move down over the mid-Atlantic, especially below the Mason-Dixon line. Hopefully we'll get an arctic blast or two before Winter is over; I just hope that it's not too little too late.
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Roger Z
January 8, 2006
Member since 01/16/2004 🔗
2,181 posts
Quote:

The size of the arctic air mass that forms each Winter




MM- curiosity question here: do you have links to any articles that talk about the size of the arctic air mass, or the air mass more generally? This is the first time I've heard about that- I've heard of water masses and the ozone and all that stuff, but not the arctic air mass.
langleyskier
January 8, 2006
Member since 12/7/2004 🔗
824 posts
Quote:

Of course, Global Warming has also taken it's toll. The size of the arctic air mass that forms each Winter has gotten smaller in recent times making it harder for the cold air to move down over the mid-Atlantic, especially below the Mason-Dixon line.




Global warming is not a year to year thing and how could you explain the snow in asia, frost in new deli and snow in dubai. You cannot pin everything that happens on global warming. We have cold winters and warm winters this may just turn out not to be our winter. I am not arguing with overall global warming but you cannot say specific events or even months of warmth are a byproduct of global warming.

Now back on topic: That snow in asia is amazing!! Also, check out mammoth mountain, CA. 12 feet of snow from christmas to january 2nd!

mammoth snow
David
January 8, 2006
Member since 06/28/2004 🔗
2,444 posts
According to the snowfall history they got 115 inches in just 3 days. On Jan. 1st they received 55 inches, which is almost as much as our local resorts have got all year. The only question we should be asking ourselves is why do we live on the East Coast????
Roger Z
January 8, 2006
Member since 01/16/2004 🔗
2,181 posts
Quote:

The only question we should be asking ourselves is why do we live on the East Coast????




Because we enjoy driving on the Beltway so much?

I guess it's like the old joke about the guy beating his head against the wall. His friend asks why he's beating his head against the wall, and he says "well, it feels SO good when I stop."
Roger Z
January 8, 2006
Member since 01/16/2004 🔗
2,181 posts
Quote:

The only question we should be asking ourselves is why do we live on the East Coast????




Because we enjoy driving on the Beltway so much?

I guess it's like the old joke about the guy beating his head against the wall. His friend asks why he's beating his head against the wall, and he says "well, it feels SO good when I stop."
jimmy
January 8, 2006
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
2,650 posts
RogerZ, double posting now?
jimmy
January 8, 2006
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
2,650 posts
RogerZ, double posting now?
Roger Z
January 8, 2006
Member since 01/16/2004 🔗
2,181 posts
Only double fisting, Jimmy. Darn it, you're back. Well, I've opened quite a gap. Good luck catching up, sucker..
Mountain Masher
January 8, 2006
Member since 03/13/2004 🔗
541 posts
langleyskiier, Global Warming CAN be seen in year to year trends. The current cold and snow in Asia are a result of the Arctic air mass dipping down over that part of the globe. And, at the same time, we're having mild weather over much of North America. There's only so much arctic air and when it dips (or oscillates) over one area it's offset by mild air somewhere else. And again, the size of this arctic air mass seems to be getting smaller, which is believed to be a result of Global Warming.
Mountain Masher
January 8, 2006
Member since 03/13/2004 🔗
541 posts
Roger Z, I learned about the decreasing size of the Winter arctic air mass via PBS. Specifically, on Weather World, a Penn State based show. And, via a PBS special on Global Warming that was aired last Fall. Granted, you're not likely to find this type of information on FOX News.
David
January 9, 2006
Member since 06/28/2004 🔗
2,444 posts
Quote:

RogerZ, double posting now?




Is that considered cheating in the DCSki rule book?
jimmy
January 9, 2006
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
2,650 posts
Quote:

RogerZ, double posting now?




No, double posts are usually a software quirk, but i do think quoting yourself is in bad taste .
bawalker
January 9, 2006
Member since 12/1/2003 🔗
1,547 posts
Call me crazy, but I've yet to see real evidence that Global Warming is real. I do believe however that over industrializing is taking it's toll on forrests, urbal sprawl is congesting roads and ticking me off after having to drive Dulles Greenway. Anyway, I think Global Warming is like evolution, a pretty polished theory that has no factual evidence behind it to say thats the truth. I've yet to see anyone looking at or studying long term (hundreds of years) weather pattern changes that could eventually swing back causing the Mid-A to be less than 32*F from Nov - March.

I know this will piss off the 'establishisment', but you know what? *flips the middle finger to the establishment*

Roger Z
January 9, 2006
Member since 01/16/2004 🔗
2,181 posts
Oops... I just saw what you're talking about Jimmy. Yes, it was Adelphia's fault (my cable internet access provider). I'll have to get to 1,001 posts (The 1,001 Arabian Posts) to actually qualify.

Most of the board will be happy to know I've taken a vow of silence on global warming. That means one less chance to p*** off dozens of readers and make a jerk of myself. All I can say is: STOP GLOBAL WHINING!
KevR
January 9, 2006
Member since 01/27/2004 🔗
786 posts
I still hope for above freezing snow... read this article to show that there's hope! And it ties two threads together ... now that's an article! "Drunk water, like drunk people, freezes easier"

---
Can Testosterone Help Explain How Clouds Form?
For more information on this story contact:
Email Marcia Goodrich <mlgoodri@mtu.edu>
Phone: 906/487-2343



JUNE 6, 2005 -- Your grade school science teacher lied to you.

What's the freezing point of water? If you answered 32 degrees Fahrenheit (or 0 degrees Celsius), you are among the vast, misinformed majority. Will Cantrell, an assistant professor of physics, explains how nearly everyone gets it wrong.

"When I ask, 'How does water freeze?' people look at me crosswise and say, 'That's easy. Just get it cold,'" he says. "But if you take pure water and cool it to 30 degrees Fahrenheit, you'll have liquid water for a long time."

In fact, if you were to suspend a drop of pure water in the air, out of contact with any surface, you'd have to chill it to about minus 35 Celsius, or 37 below zero Fahrenheit, before it would turn to ice. Fortunately for hockey players and purveyors of snow shovels, everyday water is not pure and is almost always touching a surface of some sort. But it does raise an interesting question: Why does water behave so strangely?

"Water is hard to freeze because it's kind of unruly," says Cantrell. "Trying to convince it to organize into a crystal can be really difficult."

On most surfaces, from dust to pavement, water crystallizes into ice with the same predictability that caused us all to miscalculate its freezing point. (The melting point of pure ice--32 degrees F., 0 degrees C.--is virtually immutable.) Cantrell is investigating what properties a surface must have to raise water's freezing point that high.

This would seem a mere theoretical exercise if it didn't hold the key to how cirrus clouds form. These thin, gauzy clouds form miles up in the atmosphere, and while they don't cause thunderstorms they can play a role in the climate by reflecting sunlight and absorbing heat radiating up from the earth's surface.

Cirrus clouds around the equator may be particularly influential. "The tropics are the thermostat for the planet," says Cantrell, who earned his PhD in Atmospheric Science. "The tropics control global climate. And affecting cirrus clouds affects the temperature of the tropics."

Your average cirrus cloud is miles up in the air, so its constituent ice crystals form in the absence of debris such as dust or soot. But suppose such particles found their way up there, through the burning of forests for agriculture or the exhaust from high-flying jets. "As we put more stuff like this into the atmosphere, how will that change the properties of cirrus clouds?" Cantrell asks. "Nobody knows what effects that could have."

They do know that soot raises the freezing point of pure water slightly, from minus 37 to minus 30 degrees Fahrenheit.

But that's nothing compared to the effect the most famous (male) hormone of all, testosterone, has on water.

"With a little testosterone, water will freeze at about minus 1 degree Celsius," Cantrell deadpans. "I am not making this up."

His research focuses on why testosterone and another class of chemicals that Dave Barry would probably like, long-chain alcohols, are so effective in raising the freezing point of water.

"Drunk water, like drunk people, freezes easier," Cantrell notes. "I want to understand how some of these substances are able to convince water to organize into crystals."

"We don't know yet how they do it," Cantrell says. "But we are getting there."

This funny research has a very serious underpinning, which is why Cantrell's work has received support from NASA and the National Science Foundation. The more we understand about the freezing point of water, the more we can learn about how changes in the atmosphere might affect clouds and even global climate.
bawalker
January 9, 2006
Member since 12/1/2003 🔗
1,547 posts
Hrm, so the moral of the story is to hook a line of Budweiser upto the snowguns?
Roger Z
January 9, 2006
Member since 01/16/2004 🔗
2,181 posts
I'd happily donate some testosterone to fight global warming, but the first nation to launch beer into the sky instead of drinking it should be invaded, levelled, and the ground salted like some Old Testament prophecy come true. This is a matter of priorities, after all. However, any nation that launches wine spritzers or other sissy drinks is ok- though such drinks may have negative testosterone, negating any benefits.
KevR
January 9, 2006
Member since 01/27/2004 🔗
786 posts
Roger you may be overacting, snow gun beer slopes...
bawalker
January 9, 2006
Member since 12/1/2003 🔗
1,547 posts
Gives you a new reason to wreck and crash on the slopes with the beer slopes eh?
warren
January 10, 2006
Member since 07/31/2003 🔗
485 posts
Brad,
Hmmm, this would interesting. Everyone would just be on the side sucking on the snow guns
I guess this ties into the skiing while intoxicated thread....

-Warren-
bawalker
January 10, 2006
Member since 12/1/2003 🔗
1,547 posts
Hrm, I might like that. At least with everyone over sucking on the snow guns there won't hardly be anyone actually riding on the slopes which means no bowling ally's of carnage going down one.
Roger Z
January 10, 2006
Member since 01/16/2004 🔗
2,181 posts
B double e single r G-U-N. Just doesn't work there, fellas, sorry.

On a brighter note, while fiddling around with Google Earth and the Weather Channel today, I found out two very important things. First, there is a volcano in Guatemala that has a satellite image of having snow on it, adding another nation to the "must visit" list. According to another website, as a matter of fact, no one has skied this volcano yet. Time to make some serious first tracks!

On an even more important note (if you can believe it), I was surprised to find that temps are running about 5 to 10 degrees below normal in central Alaska right now. So far, it's barely broken zero in Fairbanks this month. Although this isn't record setting cold, it is indicative of bottled up arctic air. We had a similar situation in early November, when there was a lot of cold air in Alaska and nothing down here, that got released on us for three weeks in December.

My bet is that long term this bodes well for us. As a matter of fact, we here in the Mid-Atlantic stand to get a double "thank you" for putting up with this warm air due to an oncoming cold spell and extra warm water in the Great Lakes. If/when the cold air breaks, the mountains from Clingman's Dome north could have some fierce lake effect unleashed on them.

Also, the temps have been below normal down in the tropics (Guatemala, etc). I have no idea what this means for us- probably nothing- but it does suggest our warmth build up is isolated in this hemisphere.

I'm a terrible weather prognosticator (even worse than trained weathermen), but I've got a hunch that February could turn out to be a marvelous month. All we need is the speed of these storms to slow down and allow some oscillation in the jet stream. If the pattern gets set, we could have several snowy weeks ahead of us.

Think positive! And Ski Guatemala!
KevR
January 10, 2006
Member since 01/27/2004 🔗
786 posts
any one skied new zealand? both volcanic and skiable

As for beer, really the FOAM is what i was thinking, don't you think foam would make better lighter fluffier snow shooting out of the end of a snow gun? Maybe? it seems like it could... not really necessarily beer foam, that was really just a joke
tgd
January 10, 2006
Member since 07/15/2004 🔗
585 posts
My theory on Mid atlantic winters is to expect 2 months of winter out of 3. The two months will probably not be contiguous, and may even be fragmented week-by-week between late December and March. Even in excellent snow years we seem to rarely break this rule. Everyone remembers 2002-2003 - 220" in Canaan Valley; HOWEVER, after the great Presidents Day storm that year (46" at my house in Tline), I think we only had another 10-12" for the rest of winter. The snow machine just shut down. So far this year we've had around 3 weeks of winter - that means we're due for another 4-5 weeks by my guesstimate. Which means the best skiing should be ahead of us. I always like that feeling - kind of like the feeling of being NEXT. Well, everyone thought last year was going to be a crappy winter. Anyone sulking over this year needs to read back in the DCSki archive about this time last year. Whoa, everyone was really in a funk over winter then. Things turned around very nicely - we had over 70" of snow in Canaan Valley in March. It snowed constantly. Great light powder. I love March skiing. No crowds, daylight until almost 7PM, and lots of nice mild (not too warm) blue bird days. I will take a backloaded winter like last year's anytime.
fishnski
January 11, 2006
Member since 03/27/2005 🔗
3,530 posts
Hal la frickin snowy luao ya!!!!..Maybe this weekend even?? could be interesting!
tgd
January 11, 2006
Member since 07/15/2004 🔗
585 posts
The possibility of Asia exporting some of its snow to WVA Friday night into Saturday is making this weekend look a lot better. We'll be there Sat-Mon.
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