Speed gaining carving?!
11 posts
6 users
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BushwackerinPA
November 29, 2005
Member since 12/9/2004
649 posts
I have been messing around with this since last year, but have been really perfecting it over the past couple days at springs. This is kinda of hard to explain but on relitivetly flat slopes(like top of northface), I have learned a way to carve and accelerate my downhill speed during each carve.

to due this I simply start out skating and continue that same movement, pressure, edging, rotation elect right in to very short radius carved turns. At the start of each turn I pressure with everything I got on the uphill then outside skis, continue to pressure untill the ski reach the fall line. Then I hurry up and repeat with the new uphill ski, and repeat untill I am up to speed.

I was able to carve(like tons of angulation) down nearly flat surfaces doing this technique, and at the same time I was out running my skating friends(which BTW are very good strong skis that have all been skking for all their short lifes).

Has anyone ever heard of this or tried this? I think it will only work with really short SL sidecuts skis. I might be on to something new here, and would love to name something a Bushwacker turn lol.
Taylormatt
November 29, 2005
Member since 12/3/2004
339 posts
This has been done in the race course for years. All you are doing is loading the ski and letting the tail kick when coming out of each turn. It can be done with any ski, but best results are with stiffer tailed skis like SL's, GS's or the cross carver type skis. It can be done with short, medium or long radius turns.
kennedy
November 29, 2005
Member since 12/8/2001
792 posts
I've done something similar on a board. It feels like you are driving the board through a carve. As I enter the apex of a carve I load up pressure on the edge unloading into the edge transition then repeat. i's like using the edges bite as a springboard so as you transition you almost leap into your next turn. It's acceleration but it is more controlled. If I want fast I just let the board run flat and hang on for dear life. I still haven't taken it to the upper limit of how fast it can go.
Crush
November 29, 2005
Member since 03/21/2004
995 posts
BushwackerinPA - you've discovered the magic of pure carved turns! On a flat slope you do seem to be accelerating at the end of the turn for two reasons (one has been listed above). A skating step turn is basically a non-skidded turn.

1) You are not skidding (mostly) and thus when you are in the fall line you accelerate. Your momentum at the end of the turn is preserved, so if you carve perfectly, you will accelerate every turn you make ... just as a dropped object continues to accelerate over time (32 ft/sec^2) .

2) You do get a little kick from rebound

There is a third thing ... you can practice this running on flat skis on a nearly level surface. Stand tall, and then dive your upper body down and forward (sort of bend at the waist, and also flex forward at the ankles like you are trying to pressure just the tips of your skis), then straighten up. Repeat over and over with a rhythm of about one dive every 2 seconds and you will feel your skis build speed as you do this.

Now try to do the same motions at the end of the turn (or begining of the next) ... as you change edges move not only over but forward ... imagine you are surrounded by a box or someone drew a square in the snow around you. You are in the middle of it. If you are going to make a right turn, you want to try move over to the right AND forward like you are trying to stick you hands (or chest or both) into the right corner of the box. It will do the same thing. More importantly, though, it will make a good edge change in balance so you can be efficient and carve the new turn from the top.

That is why you see Bode Miller do all the arm waving.... he is tring to huck his upper body into the corner of the box not only to stay on his toes but also to get that little speed boost.


The real trick is to pure-carve on steep terrain. You must angulate a lot (your inside hand may touch the snow a little) and be willing to accept the speed (control it by actually going uphill). You may also find that the faster you go the more you must break at the waist (your inside knee might touch your chest a little). And always ski with your feet very far appart. And try to also carve the INSIDE ski as well (shin bones parallel with each other as much as you can) and pull the inside foot back ( also helps you not kill yourself when you start going fast).

I LOVE to carve! When I am on groomed runs I like to exclusively carve when I can I love pulling G's! People say I am a fast skier ... but not because I want to go fast, but because I am always carving because I like the feeling. The speed is a byproduct of the turn.

Have fun with it!!!!!!!!!
snowcone
November 29, 2005
Member since 09/27/2002
589 posts
Well, I'm just a greenie gal but that slingshot effect is a real buzz! The effect is similar to driving a sports car [a proper one like a porsche not a friggin lexus] and accelerating mid way thru the optimum line of a curve for increased stability. I haven't had a decent performance car since I came back stateside but the best way I have found to get that same awesome feeling and still remain legal is to ride the arc then lay those babies over at that same curve point and CARVE!

Ferrari or Five Stars, the physics are virtually the same ... Woohoo, I luv it!
Tick
November 29, 2005
Member since 05/27/2005
41 posts
Kennedy, I too am a mere knuckledragger. I experienced my first real carve on a board a few years ago, and now "crave the carve". In fact, I have an all alpine setup now. If you're interested in that aspect of snowboarding here's a great site:

http://www.bomberonline.com/
BushwackerinPA
November 29, 2005
Member since 12/9/2004
649 posts
I am accelrating crush, someone was skating besides me, and they could not keep up, we are talking a 7s double green circle here. It is not just a feeling, I am for sure gaining speed, last year when I was ski shape I could do this on tracker at Hidden Valley which is totally flat.

TO the poster that mention ferrari pssh i have a Honda Civic that will outhandle you ferrari not an exgaration, it pulls 1.7 g on a skidpad vs 1.05 for an Enzo.
BushwackerinPA
November 29, 2005
Member since 12/9/2004
649 posts
kennedy
November 29, 2005
Member since 12/8/2001
792 posts
I've been thinking about carving boards but I can't do that degree of front and back stance angle. Another good trick to learn is maintaining and gaining speed in transitions. For example if you decend Bear Claw at Silver Creek heading for the Flying Eagle lift, there is a series of small rollers approaching the lift. I was with a guy who lost all speed when it comes to those and ended up skating back whereas I'm riding all the way to the lift. I realized I was using a skating trick of pumping trannies. As I come towards the star of the uphil I stand up straight, as I climb I pull my legs up in tune with the slope and then on the downside drop all my weight and push down into the hill. as a result you accelerate through the rollers. It's very like the process of getting air without the air. In reality you're supposed to accelerate and maintain speed more on snow than in the air.
Crush
November 29, 2005
Member since 03/21/2004
995 posts
I probably was not clear .. indeed you *are* accelerating (and feeling it too) ! Plus skating pure will only gain speed up to a certain speed .. then it is better to turn efficiently as you have found. That is why you beat the other person ...
BushwackerinPA
November 29, 2005
Member since 12/9/2004
649 posts
Its called pumping transtions, been doing that since my skating days, works really good to win skierx races.
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