Instruction Needed
15 posts
11 users
1k+ views
RiverHill
September 28, 2005
Member since 01/16/2005 🔗
28 posts
I have skied a handfull of times, but I now want to learn how to ski and not just point my skis down the mountain. Since Liberty is the closest to me I guess it would be the best place for me to learn. What do you guys think the best way to learn to ski is private instruction, group lessons or other? Also if you were going to suggest a intructor do you have any suggestions? I probably will want to do my instruction during the week as it is less crowded.
jimmy
September 28, 2005
Member since 03/5/2004 🔗
2,650 posts
Hey RiverHill, post #2, welcome to dcski. Several instructors post here who will give you a good idea what to do. Remember this, if you can swing a mid week lesson, chances are a group lesson could turn into a private .
RiverHill
September 28, 2005
Member since 01/16/2005 🔗
28 posts
That's a good tip. Mid-Weeks are very good for me.
JCHobbes
September 28, 2005
Member since 09/12/2005 🔗
94 posts
Definately the lowest possible teacher to student ratio is the best. So if you can afford a private lesson or two, go for it. Otherwise, just aim for group lessons on non-peak days (midweek and days that syteeler games are on) and a group lesson could very easily turn into a private.
kennedy
September 29, 2005
Member since 12/8/2001 🔗
792 posts
Some good opportunities are usually available early season too. Last year, Lib, WT and RT all offered lessons for something like $20. My wife took one and because it was so quiet it was just her.
RiverHill
September 29, 2005
Member since 01/16/2005 🔗
28 posts
If I was going to take a Private Lesson, do you have any suggestions on instructor?
Taylormatt
September 29, 2005
Member since 12/3/2004 🔗
339 posts
Also look into multi week adult programs. We have them at 7S and I'm sure most mountains have something similar. Most are a 5-6 week program, group instruction with the same instructor every week, once a week. Very good for making progress as the instructor knows what you last worked on/needed, etc and can watch progress and plan new lessons. Prices for these programs are very good and the groups tend to be small.
Ullr
September 29, 2005
Member since 11/27/2004 🔗
531 posts
Quote:

If I was going to take a Private Lesson, do you have any suggestions on instructor?




There are lots of good Instructors out there. Once you pick a mountain, go to the Ski School desk and tell them what you are looking for. For example tell them if you want a laid-back type of person or a person who is aggresive. Also, I could not tell if you were a male or female, but many women want a female instructor. My wife however did not. She insisted on a man. Some people would prefer a more experienced (older) instructor, some do not care. Let the person behind the desk make some suggestions and perhaps you could even go out to line-up to meet some of them. There are different levels of certification, but this in no way means that one instructor is better than another, it is what you like and what you respond well to. In closing I would encourage you to go with a private lesson, and try to do it for several days in a row. Do about two hours in the morning with the Instructor, then spend the rest of the day working on what he/she showed you. Go back the next day and learn some more.
EasternSkiBum
September 29, 2005
Member since 08/20/2004 🔗
68 posts
Liberty does have a multi-week program called the Developement Program they have both adult and junior classes.

If you want private mid-week than any of our full timers are great (Susan Applegate, Brian M. ?,).

Many of the part time instructors are also of very high quality. I'm just stumped for specific names because I know so many of them.

Liberty spends a lot of time and resources training instructors. We have a very high percentage of Level 2 and Level 3 certs. As always... If you get a lesson your not satisfied with tell the supervisor. It's your $ and they will work with you to make it right.

I almost forgot to mention the best way to improve your skiing. Become an instructor! I didn't learn to really ski until I became one. Contact the snowsports school to get the dates for the class. Liberty is always looking for new people.
Roy
September 29, 2005
Member since 01/11/2000 🔗
609 posts
Uller and EasternSkiBum both make good points. If you don't know the type of person you want, go midweek and take a class lesson. Then see how you liked that instructor and maybe that is the person you request a private with later. Most of the full timers are great at listening to you and discovering what you want when you sign up for a private.
BushwackerinPA
September 29, 2005
Member since 12/9/2004 🔗
649 posts
Totally agree on going mid week to get lessons. I use to work Full time and was very glad to take mid week"groups" that were normally just a person or 2.
Otto
September 30, 2005
Member since 11/19/1999 🔗
176 posts
Quote:

If I was going to take a Private Lesson, do you have any suggestions on instructor?




Me
EasternSkiBum
September 30, 2005
Member since 08/20/2004 🔗
68 posts
Quote:

Quote:

If I was going to take a Private Lesson, do you have any suggestions on instructor?




Me




Or for that matter Me! I have to say that Otto is pretty good too..

therusty
September 30, 2005
Member since 01/17/2005 🔗
422 posts
A few things to consider:
1) Liberty, Whitetail and Roundtop may be offering free group lessons before Christmas (we did last year).
2) (Night) Lessons are free all season with a Night Club card
3) An Advantage card gives you 40% off lessons. Get one if your going to visit Liberty/Whitetail/Roundtop more than 4 times this season. Get one at Fell's Point this weekend and you can save an extra $5 off the early season price.

Everyone's personal situation is different. Some people do better in a group lesson because it gives them extra time to think, practice and watch other people. Some people have slow or fast learning abilities that can make a private lesson an order of magnitude more productive than a group lesson. Sometimes a person can bond with a particular instructor such that instructor becomes much more productive for them any other. Sometime's all it takes is a low student/teacher ratio to make a lesson productive.

Whatever you decide, it helps to come to your lesson with specific goals in mind and to communicate those goals to your instructor. If you have trouble deciding upon goals, ask your instructor to help you develop some. Always make sure you walk away from each lesson with things to practice and clear goal of what to do next.
RiverHill
November 28, 2005
Member since 01/16/2005 🔗
28 posts
It's getting closer. I can't wait to go out on the slopes
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