Training to Improve
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JCHobbes
September 18, 2005
Member since 09/12/2005
94 posts
So, I've definately decided that I'm going to be joining ski patrol at either Seven Springs or Laurel Mountain (if they open) for the '06 ski season.

I'm hoping to spend most of this season bettering my skills, and improving myself all around. I already have a few problem areas that I want to work on,and I'll probably do some sessions with ski school to improve, but does anyone have any specific suggestions on stuff I could work on during the season to improve myself for next season?

I know it's kind of a vague question, but I don't know how to elaborate much more.

Other than pulling a toboggan, are there any specific skiing skills that I as a future patroller may need?
The Colonel - DCSki Supporter
September 18, 2005
Member since 03/5/2004
3,062 posts
I do not know of anything specific, I suggest you address you question to patrollers at the resorts you hope to augment next year, maybe they can help you to get ready this year. Also, any patrollers out there, let's try to help this guy.
The Colonel
Heather
September 19, 2005
Member since 02/24/2005
170 posts
If yu have the opportunity to ski with the LM Patrol, your candidate year will be most certainly dedicated to ski skills (stick with your basic skills, as the are the ones most used when patrolling, moving sleds). Generally, the patrol runs S&T clinics either every Sat or Sun during the ski season, these are mandatory for all candidates. Once you have "tested" and completed the OEC coure, it is also required that you particiate in one/a few ski clinics with an instructor of the patrols choosing (usually, no, always with high level instructors). You will also be asked to participate in S&T clinics with some of our senior level patrollers and patrol leaders and directors. These skills are not things that you would expect. I can't tell you how much of a hard time I had Re-learning some of the most basic skills. such as side slipping. A couple days of frustration and muscle aches and I finally got it! Now most people feel that it wouldn't be hard to take a sled down any hill, just use your strength. Well, let me tell you, that at a whoppin 4'11" and weighing in at a massive 94lbs, I was actually able to accomplish this not with muscle obviously, but using basic skills, a really good chain brake on the sled and an excellent tailman. Communication is another huge part of patrolling. You must be able to say what you mean and mean what you say. So in a nutshell, during the rest of the unseason, work on that(communicating I mean), and I really hope that I get the pleasure of seeing you on the hill in one of LM Patrol Candidate vests in the upcoming ski season.


***THINK LAUREL***
JohnL
September 20, 2005
Member since 01/6/2000
3,509 posts
Quote:

Other than pulling a toboggan, are there any specific skiing skills that I as a future patroller may need?





At the risk of being even more of a wisea** than normal, why don't you practice standing at a busy intersection in the DC area, yelling at the drivers to slow down, otherwise you'll revoke their driving license.
DCSki Sponsor: Seven Springs Mountain Resort
Heather
September 20, 2005
Member since 02/24/2005
170 posts
JohnL, I hope that your experience with the LM Patrol didn't leave you this soured towards the "good will ambassodors of the slopes".
JohnL
September 20, 2005
Member since 01/6/2000
3,509 posts
I was referring more to Ski Patrol in general (and not too seriously either.)

I thought everyone I met at Laurel Mountain last winter was very friendly; that's one of the reasons I really like the place.
tromano
September 20, 2005
Member since 12/19/2002
998 posts
Quote:

At the risk of being even more of a wisea** than normal, why don't you practice standing at a busy intersection in the DC area, yelling at the drivers to slow down, otherwise you'll revoke their driving license.




This would make a great short movie.
therusty
September 20, 2005
Member since 01/17/2005
422 posts
JC,
You'll need to get more specific in order to get the best advice. Here are some basic areas to give you some ideas.

Skiing skills
-------------
Improve skier level from level x to level y (skier level from 1-9) (level definitions )
Improve all conditions ability (skiing in flat light, heavy snow, rain, fog, deep powder, solid ice, breakable crust, slush, sugar snow, etc.)
Improve carving, bumps, steeps, racing, terrain park/tricks, 1/2 pipe
Improve basic skiing skills (balance, edging, rotary, pressure)
Learn drills (a different approach to learning basic skills, but basicaly the same thing)
Improve speed control
Improve fitness

Patrol skills
-------------
Sled handling
EMT knowledge
People skills (dealing with injured people and distraught family members)
Mental skills (remaining calm in a crisis)
Movement Assessment (to know when a skier is out of control vs just skiing fast)
Lift evac procedures
Skiing while carrying bamboo/drills
Wedge through moguls
Roy
September 20, 2005
Member since 01/11/2000
609 posts
Heather does the ski school at LM conduct ongoing lessons for the instructors and ski patrol? I'm an instructor at Liberty and there are different lessons scheduled everyday that go from improving our teaching skills to improving our skiing skills. The Ski Patrol is always invited. I was just wondering if it happens other places.
kennedy
September 20, 2005
Member since 12/8/2001
792 posts
Just as a fitness thing for those of you looking to build quads up before the season try this.

keep your feet about 1 1/2 to 2 times shoulder width apart. Keep your back straight and bend at the knees about halfway down and back up. Do this 9 times and on the tenth time bring your feet together squat all the way down and frog leap up. Do 5 sets a night and build from there. If it gets too easy do it on the balls of your feet. Trust me the burn will be there. It's a nice combo of building stamina and getting explosive power.
JCHobbes
September 20, 2005
Member since 09/12/2005
94 posts
Looking at the thing JohnL posted, I'm probably a 7 or 8. But that's considering the relatively lame skiing we have around here. Take me to somewhere like Killington, or anywhere and the double blacks scare the crap out of me.

But anway, I'm basically looking for skiing skills. I'm to the point where I can pretty much ski anything, but not always with extreme confidence. Is there any way to get better than to just practice at infinitum?

Also, Heather, I sent you a private message, I don't know if you got it or not. There should be a little blinking letter next to where it says "Welcome Heather. [Logout]
Crush
September 20, 2005
Member since 03/21/2004
995 posts
Hey man,
I'm not too bad an all-terrain skier plus I know some folks on the ski patrol out here. Most patrollers are hard-working folks and their skiing is strong and to-the-point. Many here use Tele skis because of their versatility when carrying stuff like poles, etc which is what you do most of the time as a patroller.

So they ski very simply and nothing fancy ... most of the time they sideslip down stuff, do kick-turns, and can ski with heavy loads.

I would suggest lots of leg work (squats, hamstring curls, toe lifts) plus body core stuff ... ab crunches plus back work on the lower lumbar.

As for skiing? How's your kick-turn? Have you ever carried
30 lbs of stuff on your shoulder while skiing? Off season I woild suggest carving turns on rollerblades while carrying stuff. Outside of that? Just good ski lessons to make sure your posture is correct in all conditions. A "proud" position (tall, balanced stance) will help you keep strong when carrying those losd.

The best way to learn tough skiing, LOL? Well you are going to be a ski patroller so I'll wager that you will be there skiing before the groomers get to some of the runs, so find yourself one with new man-made snow abd try to figure out how to ski it lol ... and get some wide skis too for those mushy days.

As for improving in general? Hmmmm lessons and race training, and lots of miles. Or if you can get to a big hill on the Northeast or here out West a clinic is probably going to do a world of good. Hey it's just one of those kinds of sports!

... geez I'm writing this as I help my G/F put highlights in her hair ... how the mighty has fallen!

Good luck!
tromano
September 20, 2005
Member since 12/19/2002
998 posts
Lol!!!

Quote:


... geez I'm writing this as I help my G/F put highlights in her hair ... how the mighty has fallen!

Good luck!


queenoftheslopes
September 20, 2005
Member since 11/15/2004
143 posts
Kennedy, tried the Quad exercise. good one.

uh, Crush...you could open your own salon now with your new hair dying skills.
POWPOW
October 4, 2005
Member since 05/10/2005
124 posts
Quote:


Other than pulling a toboggan, are there any specific skiing skills that I as a future patroller may need?




Yeah , times have changed but practice deep inhaled bong hits and jager shots. Wait maybe that was a liftie , or maybe a snowmaker, i cant remember it just all runs together

Other than poking fun i wouldnt worry too much about the skiing part it will come together by skiing more and more.
BushwackerinPA
October 5, 2005
Member since 12/9/2004
649 posts
Sking hard and fast. IS my favorite way of improving on the hill.

Untill the seasons startsthough , here are some of my favorite thing to do. Trail running great aerobic exercise that works your balance, agility, core muscles, and adaptibity to terrain. My favorite and best exersie for skiing IMO. Another thing i do is stand on about 4 pillows while i watch TV, great for working on balance. IF you have a trampoline this has the same effect of trail running but is much harder on your heart and lungs and is just palin fun.
SpringsRegular
November 30, 2005
Member since 10/14/2004
153 posts
1. Perfect your snowplow, one of the most important patrolling skills. You should be able to snow plow straight down the upper face of Stowe at Seven Springs.

2. Learn how to side slip. Forward and back. Learn to side slip through the moguls. Learn how to engage/disengage your edges.

3. Get out of the back seat!

4. Perfect your kick turns.

www.patrol.org/sssp
JCHobbes
January 12, 2006
Member since 09/12/2005
94 posts
So today was my 16th birthday.

I was informed that I've been enrolled by my parents in a 2-Day Wilderness First-Aid course offered by Venture Outdoors (a Pittsburgh based non-profit outfitter) in assocation with NOLS and WMI. I guess NOLS is actually flying out some of their instructors from Wyoming to teach the course.

It should be really cool.

Anyway, I know that I'd still undoubtedly have to go through OEC training, but would this be a positive thing to mention to a patrol director when talking about me joining?

Ski and Tell

Speak truth to powder.

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