PLEASE WEAR A HELMET
10 posts
6 users
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myrto
January 15, 2003
Member since 10/4/2001
259 posts
And if as an adult you choose to take the risk atleast be sure you children are protected.
johnfmh - DCSki Columnist
January 15, 2003
Member since 07/18/2001
1,916 posts
Another pitch for helmets. My wife complained last year that her 3 year old Boeri helmet was too hot for the Mid-Atlantic. I said, ok, we'll buy you a new one. We went to Ski Chalet and found a Giro that was a little lighter in weight and offered a vastly improved ventilation system.

In short, there have been some big improvements in helmet design and ventilation lately, so no one should refrain from wearing one on account of being too hot or uncomfortable.

Go here for more info:

http://www.giro.com/usa/gir_index.html

[This message has been edited by johnfmh (edited 01-15-2003).]

snowcone
January 15, 2003
Member since 09/27/2002
589 posts
Wear a helmet!

Even as an adult it is a smart thing to do. My family all wear them now after my sister (definitely an adult) suffered a nasty concussion in a skiing collision.

Besides the obvious safety factors, helmets are warmer than most skiing head gear and so light weight these days, you forget you have it on.

And ... take a look around ... the vast majority of skiing instructors wear helmets these days. Ya think they might know something?

JohnL
January 15, 2003
Member since 01/6/2000
3,512 posts
If I was a ski instructor at a mid-Atlantic area, I'd wear full body armor in addition to a helmet. The last thing I'd want to be doing would be standing on a crowded slope with my back to traffic talking to a bunch of people.

Otto, want to borrow my ice hockey equipment?

[This message has been edited by JohnL (edited 01-15-2003).]

myrto
January 15, 2003
Member since 10/4/2001
259 posts
Dr. Rob's Top Ten Tips for Using and Wearing Helmets When Skiing and Snowboarding:


Ski and snowboard as if you weren't wearing a helmet. All skiers and boarders should ride responsibly and in control at all times. Helmets may help prevent head injuries in the event of certain types of accidents, but are of little help in high-speed, head-on injuries and offer no protection against neck and other types of injuries.


Use a helmet designed specifically for skiing or snowboarding. Bike helmets are designed with different impact characteristics and different areas of protection than ski and snowboard helmets and should never be worn as a substitute for a ski helmet. In addition to appropriate safety design, ski helmets offer advantages, such as warmth and an integrated fit with goggles.


Take time to ensure the helmet fits properly. Ski helmets are not something to grow into. The helmet must fit properly to function safely. In addition, a helmet that is an uncomfortable fit will end up not being worn. Consult a knowledgeable salesperson at a reputable store regarding appropriate fit for a helmet and to get any questions answered.


Buy a helmet that meets industry standards. There are various helmet standards in place including CEN (the least rigorous standard), ASTM and Snell (far and away the most rigorous and hard to meet standard for certification). Be sure to review product literature for the helmet to find out which standard the helmet meets.


Adults should serve as role models for children. Children pick up on hypocrisy at light speed. If parents expect their children to ski and ride responsibly and wear helmets, then they should do so as well. Any adult who wears a helmet will help encourage children to follow suit.


Establish a firm rule regarding helmet use and skiing/snowboarding. If a parent decides that helmets should be worn, but the child is resistant, remember that it's O.K. to say no. Establish a rule, such as "No helmet equals no skiing or snowboarding." Most ski teams and academies have rules requiring helmet use in their athletes and the athletes accept these rules as a matter of course. Your child will adhere to this rule as well if it is presented in a polite, yet non-compromising manner.


Bring your child's or your goggles in when you buy your helmet. Different goggles and helmets work together differently. A well-fitting system will provide great protection for the face and forehead from cold wind and snow and still allow adequate ventilation for the goggles.


Keep goggles and helmets attached together. It is much harder to lose both a helmet and a set of goggles. Some parents may find they recoup the cost of the helmet by not having to replace lost goggles (and hats!) as often.


Use stickers and similar decorations to personalize and make helmets cool. Parents should allow the young skier/rider some liberty to add a personal touch to their helmets. Consider spending a few extra dollars and letting the child choose some cool stickers for the helmet at the time of purchase. This is sure to encourage helmet wearing.


Provide incentives for good helmet behavior. A number of professional skiers and snowboarders wear helmets and can serve as great role models. Help reinforce helmet wearing with such incentives as posters of winter sport celebrities who wear helmets, or gear worn by these celebrities.
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Robert Williams, M.D. is a pediatric anesthesiologist and associate director of the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Vermont Children's Hospital and associate professor of Anesthesiology at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. He is also an avid skier and snowboarder and serves as a medical associate for the Smugglers' Notch Ski Patrol.


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myrto
January 15, 2003
Member since 10/4/2001
259 posts
Helmets have become a buzzword in the ski and snowboard industry since last winter when two helmet-less children died in ski-related accidents. These tragedies, in conjunction with statistics from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) estimating that 7,700 head injuries and 11 deaths could be prevented each year with helmet use, have led to a national discussion about responsibility and helmet use. Last August, the National Ski Areas Association launched www.lidsonkids.org, a web site designed to educate parents and encourage voluntary helmet use.

JohnL
January 15, 2003
Member since 01/6/2000
3,512 posts
If that ski slope in Miami is covered with supermodels, I'll buy it!
JohnL
January 16, 2003
Member since 01/6/2000
3,512 posts
"7,700 head injuries and 11 deaths could be prevented each year with helmet use"

These numbers are very high to be just for skiing. What activities are covered in this estimate?

Otto
January 16, 2003
Member since 11/19/1999
176 posts
Teaching on weekend afternoons and nights on the backside of Ski Liberty makes me a big fat target. I have been wearing a helmet for several years now, and I am glad I do because it is the "experts" you don't see coming who hurt you. JohnL is right. I usually get whacked at least once a season.


I used to be a factory rep for Leedom. I am not any longer, but believe they make a very high quality helmet. If you do go in for a helmet, makes sure it fits, make sure it has good venting, and look for Snell or some other certification...

Rich
January 16, 2003
Member since 11/30/2000
194 posts
Last week I was in Jackson Hole. At a moderate-slow rate of speed making a turn toward the lift I was hit lightly from behind...fell down, but didn't loose the skis. When I got up (hardly more then a slight push) I noticed a guy about 50' away laying in a pool of blood in the snow. I had a helmet - it wasn't MY blood type! A witness skied up and testified the guy was very tentative on turns and came across the back of my skis. Hey, if you're idiotic enough to ski without a helmet...I might be able to sell you a ski slope in Miami! Maybe I should type slower too.
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