NASTAR Racers
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jimmy
December 21, 2004
Member since 03/5/2004
2,650 posts
I tried NASTAR for the first time last year and really enjoyed the challenge. One thing I learned was it's best to keep both skis on the same side of the gate!

I was wondering, as a newbie to racing if anyone has any tips on shaving tenths; also curious how hard more seasoned racers think it is to win a medal.

jimmy
JohnL
December 21, 2004
Member since 01/6/2000
3,509 posts
Quote:

One thing I learned was it's best to keep both skis on the same side of the gate!





That's also rule number one for tree skiing.

I haven't skied any gates in years, but the biggest mistake I would always make was starting my turns too late. You need to be well into a turn (or finishing a turn) by the time you reach a gate. Most non-racers (like myself) have a tendency to think of the gate location as where you are starting the turn.

Also, look ahead as much as possible. This is important for all types of skiing, especially mogul skiing.

Well-tuned skis also help a lot.

Unfortunately, most NASTAR courses I've seen lately have the gates set-up pretty straight; i.e., you see lots of skiers tucking the course and not having to make round turns. Many are on very flat slopes. That type of course really doesn't entice me to spend extra money.
bawalker
December 24, 2004
Member since 12/1/2003
1,547 posts
Is NASTAR only for skiing or is there a snowboard 'division' as well?
Crush
December 26, 2004
Member since 03/21/2004
996 posts
Jimmy - for an instant 0.5-1.0 second increase realize that when you are beginning to race your start and your finish are very important.

1) Learn how to start correctly by learning one of the many kick-starts. It can give you up to a second by itself.

2) usually NASTAR's last three gates are set very straight. When you see the last three, try to thread as straight a line a possible through them and tuck. Usually NASTAR finishes are very flat so after the last gate lean waaaaaay back on your tails and you will gain a little speed. Also try sticking your hand low and in front of your tips to try and trip the timing lights at the finish by moving your hand up and down as it passes through the finish it is worth maybe 0.05.

The best thing to do is get some good race training. Contact Ski Libery and ask about Wed. night gate training with Larry Peterson. If he still runs it he will get you straight.

Good luck, racer!
jimmy
December 30, 2004
Member since 03/5/2004
2,650 posts
Quote:

Is NASTAR only for skiing or is there a snowboard 'division' as well?




From NASTAR..."When you register to race you will be asked to select a Racer Discipline. Disciplines to choose from include Alpine Skier, Snowboarder, Telemarker or a certain disability for Physically Challenged Racers."

Timberline is the only place i've raced for a time and their course is one that's flat at the end. I've run the gates at 7Springs, not on the clock. Their course is a double or tandem on Tyrol slope and it's steep and straight. Good tips, thanks much. I'm off to epicski to see what I can find out about kick starts.

jimmy
Crush
December 30, 2004
Member since 03/21/2004
996 posts
cool ... oh yeah the 7-springs race course I did that one as a WSI GS once it was good ... hey you know what dual courses are great try to choose a good racer to go up against because you will see where on the course you are slow or fast. I find I loose time at the start or first gate and then I maintain or catch up. So I know I am slow to start (gee I should go and study kick-starts!). Hey have fun!
Shadow
October 17, 2005
Member since 01/22/2005
22 posts
Quote:

hey you know what dual courses are great try to choose a good racer to go up against because you will see where on the course you are slow or fast.




I tried this with my ski buddy trying to get some NASTAR times in for last season but alas the course at Deer Valley is not NASTAR. WELL POO!!!
kwillg6
October 17, 2005
Member since 01/18/2005
2,020 posts
T-line does several dual format races each year on their NASTAR course. Lots of fun. I discovered a long time ago that the faster you race the better the handicap . It also helps if the pacesetter is slow. Starts are the most important part of any race, but if you can't turn, what's the use?
TLaHaye
October 27, 2005
Member since 02/9/2005
136 posts
I suspect "kick starts" refer to getting your poles over the wand, but your feet as far behind it as possible and still get leverage. Then, try to have as much momentum as possible when your feet hit the wand. Remember that the clock starts not with the beep, but by tripping the wand.

One of my kid's coaches described the racing thing really well. He said "An expert recreational skier can ride his skis in any terrain in any conditions. To be an even average racer, you must drive your skis precisely from this gate to the next and be properly positioned for the next gate once you get there, all while skiing the optimum path down the same condition and terrain variables faced by that recreational skier."

Hmmm! Ever notice how you can always pick out those skiers with significant race experience? Maybe that's why. My kid's primary sport is swimming, and it always amazes me how effortlessly he moves through the water, especially when free swimming. Then I watch him skiing moguls, and he flows down Shay's like water. Similar concept ... with practice, its all just effortless. Man am I envious.

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