Gouges in base
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LordHedgie
December 20, 2004
Member since 12/1/2004
49 posts
I hit some rocks doing some early turns, and one of my skis has a long (18"), very shallow gouge -- and a small (<1") deep gouge. The deep one looks almost a millimeter deep, and touches the edge -- but it doesn't appear to have cut through to any material that looks any different to me.

I'm obviously not a really smart guy when it comes to this sort of thing, so I took them in to the shop for advice. They told me I'd need a base grind, and it would cost $45. Not bad, I thought -- then she told me it wouldn't be ready until New Years, because they were so busy. She also told me they weren't so bad that I couldn't ski on them over the holidays and just bring them back in next month, when they'd hopefully be less busy.

So, is it OK to ski on this ski? I live in Westminster -- is there anywhere in particular I ought to take them? Any other advice?
comprex
December 20, 2004
Member since 04/11/2003
1,326 posts
If I understand your description of the damage correctly, it is a really minor matter.



Items needed: sturdy cigarette lighter, Ptex candle, steel scraper.

For a rough idea of the process, see the first three pictures here. Now, the procedure shown there is basically correct except that the flame of the candle is shown as -orange-, when in fact you want the candle almost next the base (no big drips) and, using the metal scraper in the other hand, you control the flame so that it is -blue-. Orange is BAD because it means little flakes of soot are going into your base, and they don't bond very well at all.

Using the same scraper (wood finishing shops might have good ones if you don't have a ski one ), scrape off the cool ptex down to flat.

Up to you if you want to base grind at New Year's; you may think about talking to a different sales clerk.

EDIT: Careful with the drips (use the scraper to catch them), they are much hotter than molten wax and can seriously burn skin even with a pinhead-size blob.
Crush
December 20, 2004
Member since 03/21/2004
998 posts
comprex .. 100% in agreement ... in my book pretty minor unless gliding the fastest you can possible go is important like you are racing or something. Me personally per a previous post I let the gouges build up a little before ptex-ing like it is still early so you'll get a few more LOL! But yeah it is not a big deal. The only problem is ptex candle patches will pull out after a while so you will have to re-ptex, tho what is it called oh yeah "Iron Grip" ptex lasts longer. Like I had a scrape that went all the way through to the metal layer and I fixed it pretty well with that stuff it comes in carbon (black) and clear. I just put a whole bunch in a little cup I formed with aluminum foil and liquified it on an electric stove range top and poured it in ... then let it cool off and shaved it down with a scraper and then a base-plane from Reliable Racing.
LordHedgie
December 20, 2004
Member since 12/1/2004
49 posts
Whew, it's good to hear it's a minor matter. I grew up skiing in the Alps as a kid, and I'm just getting back into the sport -- I don't remember ever hitting rocks in Europe, but the DC area ain't exactly the snow paradise Garmisch could be.
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JohnL
December 21, 2004
Member since 01/6/2000
3,512 posts
I'll third the notion that it's a minor matter. I agree with Crush that you probably won't even notice the gouges.

Quote:

you may think about talking to a different sales clerk.




You also may think about a new ski shop. If you are a regular customer, you should get better service than a two week turn-around, even during the busy time of the year. I took my skis in to Ski Center in DC right before closing on Saturday. Once the technician and I agreed upon what my ski needed, the next words out of his mouth were: "When do you need the skis?" Ski Center is not cheap, and I've given them a lot of business in the past year, but I appreciate the customer service on this one. (Less than one week turn-around.) If Ski Center is not convenient for you (don't know where Westminister is), find a local shop with that type of service.

Quote:

I just put a whole bunch in a little cup I formed with aluminum foil and liquified it on an electric stove range top and poured it in




What sort of fumes does that concoction put off? Flashback to this past summer when some glue from my hockey stick blade fell on my range top. I had to fumigate the whole house.
tromano
December 21, 2004
Member since 12/19/2002
998 posts
Westminster is NW of Baltimore, sorta near Ski liberty. I have heard there is a princeton sports in columbia. I don't know of anythign else further north.

It sounds like your problem is pretty minor. If you are handy go ahead and fixem yourself. I have done some similar patches a number of times and it is very easy. There is no problem to ski them as is. However, if you go over another rock next time out it increases the liklyhood of having a more costly damage come up. Especially if there is base damage near the edge.
comprex
December 21, 2004
Member since 04/11/2003
1,326 posts
Quote:


What sort of fumes does that concoction put off? Flashback to this past summer when some glue from my hockey stick blade fell on my range top. I had to fumigate the whole house.




It's actually not too bad; overheated fluoro wax is far worse. I used Birdmon's method of heating a bit of copolymer string on a drywall knife, when it softens pasting it in just like spackling compound. The smoke alarm wouldn't even go off . I have since graduated to a propane-powered base welding torch (actually originally designed to tar wooden XC bases), works much better because it heats the material you are bonding to as well.

It is a really good idea to make sure there's no oils or fluoro waxes or Zardoz still on the base area to be welded- that can make for seriously toxic smoke. Wipe of acetone'll do ya.

Not that LordHedgie needs any of that for his repairs.
EasternSkiBum
December 22, 2004
Member since 08/20/2004
68 posts
Quote:

Westminster is NW of Baltimore, sorta near Ski liberty. I have heard there is a princeton sports in columbia. I don't know of anythign else further north.






There's the Ski Shoppe in Reisterstown. Nice folks and decent service/knowledge. It's off 795. Not to far from you.
LordHedgie
December 22, 2004
Member since 12/1/2004
49 posts
Quote:



There's the Ski Shoppe in Reisterstown. Nice folks and decent service/knowledge. It's off 795. Not to far from you.




Yep -- they're the ones that told me I needed a base grind with a two week turnaround. I don't want to bash them too much, though. I bought my skis there and got a great deal on them. I'm still a pretty low intermediate skier, but every instructor I've talked to has told me I've got great equipment. I even had one ask me how much I paid, and when I told him, he asked if I got it at a swap, or as a demo.

I've taken the skis out twice since ya'll said not to worry, and haven't noticed any problems. I did switch the skis (left and right) so the gouge isn't on my cutting edge of the ski, although I'm not sure if that makes a difference.

I've never waxed or repaired my own skis, but given the great HOWTO you posted, I'm considering stopping by Princeton Sports and picking up the neccessary supplies. We'll see how brave I get...
JimK - DCSki Columnist
December 23, 2004
Member since 01/14/2004
2,669 posts
I'd be interested to hear from a techie whether there are any issues with switching skis to opposite feet for a recreational skier on modern eqmt?
twin58
December 23, 2004
Member since 04/1/2000
198 posts
"live in Westminster"

Here are two links to ski stores in Maryland. I think the first is outdated. East of Maui's Bethesda store, where I bought my first snowboard, has been gone for years, hasn't it?

http://www.delmarweb.com/maryland/skiequipment.html

http://www.skisite.com/shopsList.cfm?state=MD

You can easily change the URL to find ski stores in Pennsylvania.
twin58
December 23, 2004
Member since 04/1/2000
198 posts
"issues with switching skis to opposite feet"

I am not a techie. I will note that bindings should be adjusted to each boot. It would be odd if there were a substantial difference in the sole length of the right boot compared to the left boot. If there were, the preload adjustment would be a little out of whack if you were to swap skis. Also, some bindings permit adjustment for height at the toe and at the heel. Again, any difference in wear between the right and left boots ought to be negligible.

If you are not satisfied with my observations, I will cheerfully give you double your money back. Say hi to the EMTs.
Crush
December 23, 2004
Member since 03/21/2004
998 posts
been switching my slalom ski around for years! I "save" my good edges by switchinng skis. Even though I carve with my inside foot on my inside edge it seems to preserve what would normally be my outside edge pretty good. So if I need sharper edges I just swap 'em so they are the correct way.

And also most of the time when I take my binding to be mounted they just use one boot so the bindings are the same for right or left. The only way I know I have them switched is because I have gate deflectors on my tips so the point "the wrong way" when I have them switched.
LordHedgie
December 23, 2004
Member since 12/1/2004
49 posts
The Ski Shoppe put a "left ski" sticker on one ski, so I'm fairly certain they used both boots to mount. But the boots were brand new, so they should have been identical... In any case, I haven't noticed any difference yet.

I stopped by Princeton Sports today and asked about P-Tex, and they said they don't/won't sell it to the general public, like it were some kind of drug. They also told me no other ski shops would sell it... The best I could get out of them was "You should always take your skis to a qualified repair facility" line. So, where do you pick up a P-Tex candle?
comprex
December 23, 2004
Member since 04/11/2003
1,326 posts
Quote:

The best I could get out of them was "You should always take your skis to a qualified repair facility" line. So, where do you pick up a P-Tex candle?




LordHedgie, you certainly run into some sales staff . . .

The usual suspects for ski repair supplies:
Reliable Racing - quick; get several items to save $hipping
www.rei.com - charges tax; ship to shop to save $
Tognar - 2 week turnaround; have everything, superb catalog and info
Artech -Mom & Pop, very fast, reliable.
Race Werks -In house SVST brand good but $pendy
Shop Tek - No frills, good $

Or any reasonably open-minded shop. Sounds like you need to keep lookin'.

Quote:


P-Tex, and they said they don't/won't sell it to the general public, like it were some kind of drug




ROTFLMAO!
twin58
December 23, 2004
Member since 04/1/2000
198 posts
Quote:

... most of the time when I take my binding to be mounted they just use one boot so the bindings are the same for right or left.




Obviously they aren't as anal retentive as I am.
JohnL
December 23, 2004
Member since 01/6/2000
3,512 posts
Quote:

Obviously they aren't as anal retentive as I am.




Shouldn't that be anal-retentive.
twin58
December 23, 2004
Member since 04/1/2000
198 posts
Quote:

... Princeton Sports ... said they don't/won't sell it to the general public....




Oh, please. (My skepticism is directed at Princeton Sports, not you.) In addition to the other sources "comprex" has already suggested, let me suggest any store that sells cross-country skis or snowboards. They have polyethylene bases too. In the DC 'burbs, that would include HTO (which used to be called HBO), Eastern Mountain Sports, East Coast Board Company, and Fairfax Surf Shop. I don't know about your area.

You can always cut up cole slaw or potato salad containers from the grocery store, motor oil bottles, or half-gallon or one gallon milk jugs. Check the bottom for the recycling symbol. If it's a 2 surrounded by the three arrows with the letters HDPE nearby, that's high-density polyethylene. You can melt it down to repair gouges in the bases of your favorite snow sliding devices. Been there; done that.

HDPE from motor oil bottles, being various colors, would give your bases a sort of zesty, Martha Stewart effect. So far, I've stuck with your basic white.

http://www.designinsite.dk/htmsider/m0002.htm
twin58
December 23, 2004
Member since 04/1/2000
198 posts
Quote:

Shouldn't that be anal-retentive.




Now you've done it. I'll have to look that up.
LordHedgie
December 24, 2004
Member since 12/1/2004
49 posts
Quote:

Quote:

Shouldn't that be anal-retentive.




Now you've done it. I'll have to look that up.




Ironic, adj: Looking up the correct spelling of anal-retentive in the dictionary.

ROTFL!
Roy
December 25, 2004
Member since 01/11/2000
609 posts
That's pretty interesting about the motor oil bottle.

I agree with comprex that Tognar.com is a great site. Anything hard to find, they have. I looked all over town for a gummi stone and they were the only people to have it. They do charge shipping. However, it's still cheaper than driving around looking for the stuff you need. I got my order by priority mail (about 3 days later).
SkiBumMSP
December 29, 2004
Member since 12/8/2004
224 posts
Quote:

I'd be interested to hear from a techie whether there are any issues with switching skis to opposite feet for a recreational skier on modern eqmt?




For typical general public recreational skiiers, it should not make one bit of difference what ski goes on what foot.

I usually try to switch feet/skis every other time I go out, to give the edges more even wear.
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