Recomended skis for lady in the midatlantic.
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tromano
November 22, 2004
Member since 12/19/2002 🔗
998 posts
Hello DCSKI,

I am coming at you with another gear question. And I know how well you all helped me out last time.

MY girlfriend is looking for a nice new ski for the east cost mid-atl area. Heres her thread from Epic: Text

She jsut came back to sking a couple of seasons ago (with my help) after being a pretty good slalom racer as a teen. Now she wants to ditch her old straight boards and pick up something new. She is about 5'2" 150# and is 29(and holding!).

She skis alot slower than I do making fairly careful short(at time windshield wiper style) turns down most groomed blue and black slops arroud here... She is a really fluid skier when comfortable but she tends to freeze on ice, or at the top of steep sections and make some other mistakes that I think are related to a fear of falling. I think her old skis and the newness of it all is holding her back somewhat. And by the end of last season it seemed she was getting more in the flow of things. We skied 10 days last year.

I know how I felt 4 years ago when I went skiing the first time after taking a 4 year hiatus for college. She has worked really hard to get in shape and has lost 20# since a year ago.

Anyway, she is alredy planning a couple lessons once she gets her new equipment. But we are somewhat in a question about what she should get. I mean legitimately right now she is a level 5 or 6 skier. But we are planning to ski 20 days this season and continue... so I am worried that she will get either too much ski and won't be able to advance on it or get too little a ski that won't grow with her. What a problem!

The ski will need to handle groomed, hard pack, and ice in a variety of turn shapes short (seems to be her fav) or long...

She is looking at:

Fischer Vision 40
Rossi Zenith Z3 W
(both recomended at ski center)

Other skis that looked good were the
'03 K2 T-Nine X (or Spire) (the new K2s are just too ugly to consider)
Bandit B1 W

All skis would be arround the 150cm lenght.

We aren't able to demo arround here because we are off to quebec the 2nd week in Jan when all the local areas are having their demo days. Do you recomend leasing for the season and then buying next season? Any advice is appreciated.
JohnL
November 22, 2004
Member since 01/6/2000 🔗
3,516 posts
So you're dating Sheena? I saw the poster name on Epic recently and thought it was a good one.

I agree with the advice on Epic - demo, demo, then demo some more. Since your GF used to race, she probably has pretty decent form despite the layoff. The type of ski you can get with a season-long rental is probably not a good enough ski for her. I'd avoid that route. Tremblant should have a wealth of demo options. Try a different ski each day. Most shops will apply the cost of 2-3 demo days to the price of the ski. If you buy in Canada, you may have to worry about GST and customs declarations. If you don't declare the item, can you still get reimbursed for GST?

Were her current/previous long boards well-tuned? If not, that would make a huge difference when skiing ice. Can she still use those skis this year until she buys a new pair? Use the long boards and demo when you get the chance.

How good/old are her boots? The mantra of boots being more important than skis is very true. Though it sounds like she needs to upgrade her skis pretty quickly.

Show up at Liberty or Roundtop for lessons in December. The instructors there can evaluate your GF's skiing and may be able to recommend a ski based upon her skiing.
TerpSKI
November 22, 2004
Member since 03/10/2004 🔗
167 posts
tromano:

Resist the temptation to buy especially since she hasn't skied the new skis yet. Leasing is an interesting idea, but she might like demoing different skis as well. This is a good way to see what lengths or types of ski she likes. If you are going to destination resorts, there will be a lot of places to rent and/or demo and depending on where you ski, it can be very convenient. I will never again buy a ski before I try it.
tromano
November 22, 2004
Member since 12/19/2002 🔗
998 posts
Yep, have been dating for over a year.

Her current boards are Kastle SL450s that she got in 1988 or something. They have metal topsheet and are mighty stiff. I think they are probably alright condition they have a slight shape to them, but they are pretty stiff and are 160CM long.

We are actually hitting up MT Ste. Annes (not Tremblant)... But I am sure there are plenty of demo options. Her boots are rear entry and of approxiamtely the same vintage. She says they fit fine so I am not going to argue there but that is definately an upgrade for next year(if not now).

I took a look at the tune and the seem pretty good. The skis have a strange base w/ a long groove down the middle. Don't know much about this. But the edges are sharp. I can shave my thumb nail.

Her form is pretty good. And she made a deffinate improvement in confidence during the season last year. We have the lift tix form the ski expo and I think the snowtime resorts are offering free lessons. So thats a great option. We will also be at the skicenter demo day on 1/5.
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JohnL
November 22, 2004
Member since 01/6/2000 🔗
3,516 posts
The boots may be holding back her skiing more than her skis.

I'd like to add a clarification about getting input from a ski instructor. (The instructors on this forum will probably want to comment also.) I wouldn't expect an instructor to recommend a specific ski, but based on their evaluation of her skiing, they could probably recommend a general category of skis and an approximate length. They'd also be able to assess how her boot fit is affecting her skiing.

The right category of skis for your GF could be all over the map. Since she raced a bit, she was a pretty decent skier at one point. If an instructor thinks her technique is relatively solid and that her equipment is holding her back, she should be in a higher performance category. If her technique is what's holding her back, a more forgiving set of skis and boots is what she needs. Talk about a non-answer answer.
TerpSKI
November 22, 2004
Member since 03/10/2004 🔗
167 posts
Rear entries! Forget about the skis and get her in some new boots!
tromano
November 22, 2004
Member since 12/19/2002 🔗
998 posts
John,

That is the problem. I am not an expert on such things and I am biased any way. If you have any recomendations about who we should talk to at liberty / whitetail that would help. I awas unsure to even take a leson on the old skis. But I suppose there is nothing to do but go for it.
JohnL
November 22, 2004
Member since 01/6/2000 🔗
3,516 posts
Liberty instructors who post on this board include Otto and Roy. Maybe Eastern Ski Bum also? Physics Man teaches at Whitetail. They could recommend specific instructors or a specific lesson.

I'd assume that you'd want to take an early-season lesson on your existing equipment, not on equipment that you are unfamiliar with (i.e. demo equipment)??????
comprex
November 22, 2004
Member since 04/11/2003 🔗
1,326 posts
For a really fast confidence builder on ice, see if you can't get her a pair of Volants (Vertex 66, 68 come to mind from last year) if for nothing else as rock skis early season. Phil P. and others on the Epicski list might be able to help you here if you can't find something local easily, cheaply, or soon. Unfortunately, you just missed the last round of swaps . . .

Yes, they're called heavy but you're not really looking to encourage up-down motion.

Have fun at MSA!

To add to your demo list:
Elan S8 W
Dynastar Omecarve 9
Atomic C9
Volkl 4-star


Very valid point above about GST! Have the receipt stamped as you cross back over the border.

As far as the boots go, she may be actually ahead of the game here - at least she's not locked into way-forward-tilted blocks of concrete.
johnfmh - DCSki Columnist
November 22, 2004
Member since 07/18/2001 🔗
1,925 posts
I agree with JohnL. She needs more experience skiing shaped skis before she buys a pair. If I were her, I'd buy a new pair of boots and hold a season on skis. Rear entry boots are just not designed for the intense shin contact that shaped skis require. With new boots and some decent instruction on shaped skis, she'll inevitably graduate out of whatever she thinks she needs right now anyway. That's what happened to a friend last year who bought intermediate skis. He now wishes that he had purchased a stiffer ski.
comprex
November 22, 2004
Member since 04/11/2003 🔗
1,326 posts
All true johnfmh; however that means she rents for 3-4 weeks locally (in a happy snowy future, of course) at some expense before going off to Canada.

My rock-ski Volant opinion was based upon the possible priorities of:
- quickest skills progression through lessons (i.e. on a sidecut ski soonest without changing gear and performance envelope every rental)
- purchasing boots at resort where they can be fiddled with day-to-ski-day.
- never even being tempted to ride the old gear for a half-day at Ski Liberty
- less worry about tearing up new skis or rentals on early season rocks.
tromano
November 22, 2004
Member since 12/19/2002 🔗
998 posts
Just got back from class. Thanks for the the additions to the list Comprex.

Johnfmh, I apreciate your insigth on the differences between rear entry and modern boots. I didn't know that front entry boots were literaly required for shaped skis. I had figgured that if the boot fits...

This is really how I was feeling as well about buying too soon. When I bought my first shaped skis they were very soft and after 1 season I was ready for somethign else. I talked to Sheena (not her real name) just now and she is basicly convinced to go with boots first then skis at the end of this season once she has had a chance to demo. Thanks for all the input guys and girls.

Now all that remains is to get some boots and then in a couple weeks when the white stuff begins to fall, take a lesson or two. Is it possible to get in touch w/ Tom-PM or others through this forum or what?
JohnL
November 22, 2004
Member since 01/6/2000 🔗
3,516 posts
Quote:

Is it possible to get in touch w/ Tom-PM or others through this forum or what?




Send them a PM. I've used this DCSki feature before, and it works well. People may not realize they have a PM sent to them, so don't expect an immediate response.

You may be able to get a package deal of boots and skis, so you don't necessarily have to wait one year to have new skis and new bindings. My main advice is to not rush your purchase. It sounds like Sheena was doing OK on her previous equipment; if she buys some skis or boot in January (or later), she'll probably have numerous ski days during the rest of the year to enjoy them. If it's the right purchase, she'll enjoy them for years.

Let the pros give you some advice, and decide for yourself what you like in demo equipment.
johnfmh - DCSki Columnist
November 23, 2004
Member since 07/18/2001 🔗
1,925 posts
For boots, nothing beats a professional boot fitter and Brian Eardly at Ski Center is the man, the myth, and the legend:

http://www.dcski.com/faq/view_faq.php?faq_id=2&mode=headlines

It's going to be tricky to get an appointment with Brian at this time but do try because he's incredible. Also, Ski Center will arrange a season ski rental package for Sheena that will allow her to try a variety of skis over the course of the season. Ski Chalet also has similar programs.

Buying boots at a resort is another idea, but to be honest, the people sizing boots at resorts generally do not put as much effort into the process as someone like Brian. I bought my boots at 7 Springs and now go to Ski Center to have them tweeked.
snowcone
November 23, 2004
Member since 09/27/2002 🔗
589 posts
Ditto ... buy the boots, take the lessons!

You can't demo parabolics without decent boots. I would wait for a year before buying skis. If she is a level 5-6 skier with experience I am sure she will realize the importance in learning to ride the new skis correctly. My sister went from years as an advanced skier on straight skis to parabolics and she rides them like straight skis. What a waste! Ego prevents her from taking lessons and consequently she is a far worse skier on her new skies and has no idea of the how the new techniques can advance her skiing pleasure.

When time comes to buy skis I strongly recommend trying out some Volkl carvers. Volkl makes wonderful higher end skis for the stronger woman skier ... I think your girlfriend would love them. I wouldn't trade my Volkl carvers for the world, at least here in the East. Flex those babies and they grab onto ice like nobody's business! Furgeddabout powder though ... the Volkl carving skis are just that, carving skis but they are OUTRAGEOUS! I'm ogling those Supersports with the hot pink stars for next year's upgrade!

Take a weekend out to Snowshoe ... they have Volkls in their high-end demo shop. If you are not sure about boots, they also have higher end boots you can demo .. well at least get a better idea of what kinda flex you might like.

btw ... I notice that most of the posters on this thread are men ... how about some more female opinions here!
Roy
November 23, 2004
Member since 01/11/2000 🔗
609 posts
We won't give her a lesson if she is on her old straight skis.

If she has never been on the parabolic skis, just have her rent from the regular shop for the first day. I'd recommend 150's to start. Liberty just got all new rental equipment this year so it should be ok. If she goes during the week, almost anyone that would teach that level would be good. I don't really know any of the weekend people (heck I just met Otto last week) but he or ESB might be able to give a name. In fact, I'd suggest Otto as I've heard nothing but good things about him at the mountain.
tromano
November 23, 2004
Member since 12/19/2002 🔗
998 posts
Quote:

We won't give her a lesson if she is on her old straight skis.




Doh! I knew this would be a problem.

Quote:

For boots, nothing beats a professional boot fitter and Brian Eardly at Ski Center is the man, the myth, and the legend:

http://www.dcski.com/faq/view_faq.php?faq_id=2&mode=headlines

It's going to be tricky to get an appointment with Brian at this time but do try because he's incredible. Also, Ski Center will arrange a season ski rental package for Sheena that will allow her to try a variety of skis over the course of the season. Ski Chalet also has similar programs.

Buying boots at a resort is another idea, but to be honest, the people sizing boots at resorts generally do not put as much effort into the process as someone like Brian. I bought my boots at 7 Springs and now go to Ski Center to have them tweeked.




Johnfmh,

Thanks for the advice. I jsut got a new pair of boots. Salomon Elipse 9.0, after I got my liner moded it was like wearing the most comfotable shoe I have ever had.Seriously nice and toasty warm and ooh so soft and well fitting. I started dancing right in ski center. It wasn't a Irish Jig, but hey... Good boots let you get freaky.

I looked a ski centers site for rentals.
Text

They have some nice skis for that are worth trying. K2 5500 (not sure what sizes could be worth a try) and K2 T-nine in 160 and 163 cm, may be long for her. "And finally, for the advanced and expert women skiers we have two different skis available. The new Rossignol Pulsion, and the Head Lightning 160-C." Speaks for its self.

Now we have to get on the phone and see when these guys are available for a boot fitting. And seriously we need some girls opinions.
johnfmh - DCSki Columnist
November 23, 2004
Member since 07/18/2001 🔗
1,925 posts
Tromano:

Brian is worth the wait, but every bootfitter there works under his expert tutelage, so they will all be good.

Ski Center once told me that it would apply some or all of the cost of a rental program towards new skis. You might ask them if they will give Sheena a similar deal--let her rent 3-4 different skis (one per ski area visit), and then let her apply part or all of the cost of those rentals towards a new set of skis.
TerpSKI
November 23, 2004
Member since 03/10/2004 🔗
167 posts
I will put in a plug for Brian Beaumont for boot fitting as well. I have had both Brians fit me in the past and both are excellent.

For an instructor, I highly recommend Otto Matheke at Liberty. He also participates in this forum. I had one lesson from him last year and plan to have more this year. He communicates very clearly and is a real nice guy.
PhysicsMan
November 23, 2004
Member since 11/20/2001 🔗
218 posts
Quote:

...Is it possible to get in touch w/ Tom-PM or others through this forum or what?




[Butler_voice=ON] You rang? [/Butler_voice]

Seriously, tho, I would be absolutely delighted to work with your friend.

The best way to get in touch with me is to send me an email: physicsman000@yahoo.com.

The second best is to send me a private message over on Epicski.com

To be honest, I've never received a private message on this forum, so I don't know for sure if that function is working properly. Perhaps someone can send me a PM to do a test.

Tom / PM

PS - During the summer, another DCski person wanted to book some lessons with me. There was a thread discussing the best (ie, most economical) way to do so. Look at post #8 in this thread:

http://www.dcski.com/ubbthreads22/showflat.php?Cat=0&Board=UBB1&Number=8600
snowsmith - DCSki Supporter
November 24, 2004
Member since 03/15/2004 🔗
1,363 posts
I originally bought my wife a pair of Rossy Cut 10.4 Skis and she improved dramatically from a timid beginner to a low intermediate.Since she was progressing, I thought I would buy her some skis that would give her confidence on steeper terrain. Thus, I bought her a pair of Atomic BetaCarve 9.18 (they have an integral binding and I'm not sure what they call the model this year). I got them barely used on Ebay for a great price and they looked nearly brand new. She now skis with more confidence and keeps up with me on steep blues.However, that being said, she needs a decent pair of boots also. My wife has a decent pair of Lange womens oriented boots. I think the skis definitely have an affect on your ability. Get her some skis that will take her to the next level.
tromano
November 24, 2004
Member since 12/19/2002 🔗
998 posts
Tom,

YHPM.
tromano
November 29, 2004
Member since 12/19/2002 🔗
998 posts
Well its a done deal. She went to ski center on black friday to get Boots and came back with Skis as well! Dynstar Exclusive Carve in 153CM. I think it was a good pick. Now she can get on with crossing over to shaped skis. And man are the shaped 115-65-104. She loves to make short turns so this will definately be the ski for her.

Now I just have to wonder if I will be able to keep up on my old Mod 7/8 181s or newer volkl 5* 168s
PhysicsMan
November 29, 2004
Member since 11/20/2001 🔗
218 posts
Congrats on Sheena's new equipment - it sounds like she did well. With respect to the deep sidecut, that's the way to go for groomers around here (under most conditions). I like to do lots of short turns as well. This year, I'll probably be teaching most of the time on a pair of Head IC200s (121.5-66-106 in a 170 cm).

While she will be able to turn her new skis using the same techniques as she used on her old, straighter skis, to get the most out of her new equipment, she definitely should get some coaching.

... speaking of which ...

- re:

Quote:

Tom, YHPM.




I responded almost immediately to the PM that Sheena sent me over on Epic, but never received any reply. I just wanted to check that you two got my response.

Tom / PM
queenoftheslopes
November 29, 2004
Member since 11/15/2004 🔗
143 posts
Quote:

Congrats on Sheena's new equipment - it sounds like she did well. With respect to the deep sidecut, that's the way to go for groomers around here (under most conditions). I like to do lots of short turns as well. This year, I'll probably be teaching most of the time on a pair of Head IC200s (121.5-66-106 in a 170 cm).

While she will be able to turn her new skis using the same techniques as she used on her old, straighter skis, to get the most out of her new equipment, she definitely should get some coaching.




Thanks! I am really excited about my new equipment. Now I can't wait to get out there and use it! I definitely want to get out and take a lesson or two in the next month or so.

Quote:

I responded almost immediately to the PM that Sheena sent me over on Epic, but never received any reply. I just wanted to check that you two got my response. --Tom / PM




sorry! I was being lazy. I sent a response.
EasternSkiBum
November 29, 2004
Member since 08/20/2004 🔗
68 posts





I looked a ski centers site for rentals.
Text

They have some nice skis for that are worth trying. K2 5500 (not sure what sizes could be worth a try) and K2 T-nine in 160 and 163 cm, may be long for her. "And finally, for the advanced and expert women skiers we have two different skis available. The new Rossignol Pulsion, and the Head Lightning 160-C." Speaks for its self.

Now we have to get on the phone and see when these guys are available for a boot fitting. And seriously we need some girls opinions.




Also look at the Stockli Spirit Ed. VI... they have 1 in demo and it's very sweet.

I put in a second on Brian B.for boots. Both Brians are awesome.
jimmer
December 8, 2004
Member since 11/25/2003 🔗
53 posts
I have been teaching at Liberty for 14 years. Week nights for about the last 11 of those years. Depending on when she wants to come up, I can recommend a couple very good instructors for week-night lessons. Email me at skiing_nerd_nospam@yahoo.com (remove the _nospam from the email address) & I should be able to recommend someone for whichever day you choose. (if, of course you didn't already get together with physicsman).

Both Liberty & Whitetail have some of the best instructors in the region. Pls don't take this as a sales push - I'm only trying to help.
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