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Tamiment Resort
Pike County, Pennsylvania

Kevin Whipple writes about a lost ski area in Pike County, Pennsylvania:

    “Another lost ski resort is Tamiment Resort in the Poconos of Pike County, off Bushkill Falls Rd. very near to the popular Bushkill Falls. Tamiment was founded in 1921 as a luxury hotel/conference center and community encompassing 2,200 acres of woodlands, hills, streams, and ponds. The resort was once owned by Wayne Newton (probably in the Pocono resort hey-day when gambling was to be legalized here). It was a full-service resort with a vast amount of amenities which included a beautiful, Robert Trent Jones Jr. designed championship golf course. Some golf holes doubled as ski slopes in the winter.

    The Tamiment Resort closed its doors in 2003, and I’m unsure of the current plans for the property. I think the golf course is still open for play, but I could be wrong.

    There was one chairlift, and possibly a surface lift, for downhill skiing in the winter. The area had maybe 200 feet of vertical drop. The loading area for the chairlift is down a slope that descended from the ski lodge. There had to be some sort of surface lift to bring guests back up to the lodge, or else it is clear to see why this skiing operation did not survive. The hill going back up to the lodge from the base of the slopes had nearly 100 feet of vertical drop and was about 200 yards away, which would have made for a strenuous walk back.

    The grade of the ski slopes was beginner, with no real challenges anywhere. The chairlift was a double made by Hall. A plaque at the base of the lift says it was installed in 1972. To me, this was a poor move by the resort as there are a couple of hills on the property that would have been better suited. Plus, the chairlift runs right through a few golf holes which makes for an eye-sore during the golf months (and still does despite the ski operation shutting down). I’m sure they put it there to utilize existing facilities like the ski lodge, parking, lack of tree removal, and water lines for snowmaking (summer irrigation).

    There was a semi-modern groomer still parked there when I visited. It looked like a wonderful place to learn the sport of skiing, but not one to progress yourself to new levels. The distance from lodge to lift would certainly have been an issue unless there was a surface lift (which I couldn’t find remnants of).”

Kevin provides the following photos.

The double chair is the longer red line, with the shorter line being where there might have been a surface lift.  The red box on this map is the location of the ski lodge.
A topographic map of the area with approximate lift layout. The double chair is the longer red line, with the shorter line being where there might have been a surface lift. The red box on this map is the location of the ski lodge. Image provided by Kevin Whipple.

The plaque at the base of the chairlift, indicating that the lift was designed by Hall and installed in 1972. Photo provided by Kevin Whipple.

This shows some of the classic Hall chairlift features like the bullwheel and drive mounted on rails (like a railcar), and the separate cross arms on the lift towers fastened together making a lower case
The base of the double, looking up the lift line. This shows some of the classic Hall chairlift features like the bullwheel and drive mounted on rails (like a railcar), and the separate cross arms on the lift towers fastened together making a lower case “t” as opposed to the far more common (and safer) single cross arm forming a capital “T.” Photo provided by Kevin Whipple.

The grooming machine located in the parking lot during Kevin Whipple’s visit. Photo provided by Kevin Whipple.

Near the summit of the double. “Essentially, the lift serves just one easy meadow that is dotted with some trees,” Kevin writes. “Golf holes were used as the winter slopes.” Photo provided by Kevin Whipple.

In April, 2009, Kevin Whipple provided the following additional images:

A 3-d view of the hill from Google Earth. “There was a creek running near the base of the double,” Kevin says. “It was a nice downhill slope from the lodge to the lift (uphill return).” Image provided by Kevin Whipple.

An aerial image of the hill from Google Earth. Image provided by Kevin Whipple.

Looking down the main slope from near the top of the double chair. Photo provided by Kevin Whipple.
Ski patch for Tamiment. Photo provided by Woody Bousquet.

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jf
7 years ago
There definitely was not a tow back up to the lodge, and it was not too nice of the walk. The golf shop was converted into ski rentals some winters though. Incidentally, local rules on the golf course made hitting the ski lift with a golf ball a free do-over!
Michael Cincotta
6 years ago
I worked at Tamiment Resort during the years 1992-1999. Regardless of how you assumed it all worked, the reality of Tamiment is that it was the best place to be to vacation. There was a slope available that was operated professionally and conveniently until the last owners took over and ran the place into the ground. The slope was much steeper then the ground appeared to allow. That old groomer you have pictured was an amazing machine when Hugo Oberto was the mechanic there before he passed away. That machine was able to push “all” the snow from the bottom of the hill to the top making a very long steep slope where some would achieve over 65mph @ the bottom. People were courteously shuttled back and forth to the lodge with a heated, 16pass Ford Van as often as they wanted. Tamiment also had packages for rooms plus skiing to local ski resorts for the more serious or experienced skiers.
wilberto
4 years ago
I also worked there in 1978-1979 as a chef. It was a wonderful resort and a wonderful place to work. It. Was an era when people weren’t too lazy to walk back to the lodge. We saw and served thousands of satisfied guests.
Patti
4 years ago
My husband and I vacationed at Tamiment in the early 2000’s and we loved it. I am so sad to see that Tamiment has closed since then. I was just going to make reservations to visit again when I found this web page article. : ( We have so many great memories there. It was a beautiful place with excellent service and a lot of fun. We will miss it.
Brian Ellyn
4 years ago
We were married on New Year’s Eve, 1983 and arrived at this resort 5 am New Year’s day. Great memories of the place. In fact, I was looking to come back for our 30th anniversary at the end of this year. Really sorry to hear it closed. Hope someone makes something of it.
Stephen Mandel
4 years ago
I have been a time share owner at the tamiment since Wayne Newton owned the place. We had big name shows with hotshots driving up from NY in limos and even helicopters bringing people in. The place had everything. golf, tennis, basketball, indoor and outdoor pools. The moment Penn voted down gambling Wayne Newton bailed out. A series of other owners came and went and even poured a lot of money into the place. They had no idea what to do and had bad attitudes that drove clients away. A builder came in and tore the. Whole place down. Only the timeshares remain. After a lawsuite the timeshare property was given their own indoor pool and activity center. Thirty years as gone by and my timeshare is in again as another generation loves it. It will never be what it was. How things happen, there is a major casino thirty minutes away.
Lou Waters
3 years ago
Worked there in the early 1970’s while also a student at East Stroudsburg. Was a great place, the main building was new, and hosted acts such as Al Hirt & Frankie Vallie & the Four Seasons, which we got to see for free. The old playhouse where Danny Kaye & others performed was still standing and filled with hundreds of old photos & memorabilia. Workers got to stay in older cabins on the grounds.
Erin
3 years ago
we just moved in to one of the townhomes, near the treehouses. it is so beautiful here, i would have loved to have seen it in the heyday!
2 years ago

Mike Cincotta’s post mentioning Hugo H. Oberto really brought back a flood of memories.  Though I didn’t work there with Hugo, I did work with him on a golf course.  When I worked at Tamiment, Tim Hood was the golf course super.  I’d needed a job between semesters during college and Tim hooked me up making snow at night.  We’d cover the greens with pine boughs to protect them from ice and skiers once the cover was thin, then blow the snow over the branches.  If there was a rope tow, I didn’t know about it — we didn’t make snow anywhere but in the vicinity of the main trail.  My time there was short, but it was kind of a neat resort.

Sharpen your edges. And pencils.
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