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Shawnee Land
Winchester, Virginia

DCSki reader Marvin Hass recalls a ski area named Shawnee Land that operated near Winchester, Virginia, in the 1960’s.

“As I recall, they did have snowmaking, but only a rope tow. I remember skiing there as well as well as some of the other ‘Lost Ski Areas’ including Cherokee, Rappahanock, Braddock Heights, and Oregon Ridge,” Marvin writes.

The 1994 edition of The Colorado Skier lists a Shawnee Land ski area in Winchester existing in the late 1960s and early 1970s. A vertical drop of 400 feet is listed, along with 1 T-bar and 2 rope tow lifts.

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Mark Hoyle
9 years ago
I was up at Shawneeland last weekend and can see how this could easily have been a ski hill. I rode the trails on a mountain bike and they were steep and rugged. Does anyone have information on where the ski trails were located?
Mary Lind
9 years ago
HI, I used to live in Shawnee Land in the 1970’s. The ski area closed as did all the other ammentities that were thee including a pool, a teen cneter, alodge with dining area. Now there are just homes. We had a few of the old skis adn played with them as kids.
Tom Jenkins
9 years ago
I own property there and spent alot of weekends there in the seventies.
There used to be to ski slopes (beginners & advanced) the tow ropes were run by old broken down trucks set up on blocks on top of the slope.
I don’t remember any snow machines though there may have been earlier.
Since the resort owners went under all of the facilities have since closed. There was a pool, lake with a beach, golf coarse, rifle range, and a lodge with a resturant, and yes there was a teen club.
Tom Hafer
9 years ago
I took a prospective date to Shawnee Land in 1966. It was a total disaster. This girl had never skiied before, and once she went down the hill there was NO WAY she could ride the rope tow to get back up. She finally gave up and walked up the hill.
Being the gentleman that I am, I continued skiing - until it got too warm to wear my parka. I took it off leaving only my nice wooly ski sweater. It turns out that the rope winds around as it goes up, so when I tried to get off at the top I found that my sweater was wrapped onto the rope and there was NO WAY I could get off. It lifted me into the air and up toward the machinery; fortunately the operator was awake and stopped everything.
So I went home without a sweater OR a date.
Tom Hafer
9 years ago
I took a prospective date to Shawnee Land in 1966. It was a total disaster. This girl had never skiied before, and once she went down the hill there was NO WAY she could ride the rope tow to get back up. She finally gave up and walked up the hill.
Being the gentleman that I am, I continued skiing - until it got too warm to wear my parka. I took it off leaving only my nice wooly ski sweater. It turns out that the rope winds around as it goes up, so when I tried to get off at the top I found that my sweater was wrapped onto the rope and there was NO WAY I could get off. It lifted me into the air and up toward the machinery; fortunately the operator was awake and stopped everything.
So I went home without a sweater OR a date.
Cameron
8 years ago
The T-bar was installed in 1966 and had a length of 730 ft and a vertical of 120 ft. Hopefully that will give you a better idea of the ski area. Does anyone know if the T-bar still stands?
Jon T
8 years ago
Where abouts was this ski area located on the mountain? I’ve been up there several times just joy riding and thought it was be a great place for a small ski area…I never knew one previously existed. Where on the mountain was the rope lift operated?

Mark Hoyle, your name sounds familiar…what bike trails did you ride up there? I was unaware that any bike trails were up there. Where are they? I’d enjoy riding them sometime.
richard francis
8 years ago
had a lot at shawnee land, i guess is lost now, like to get info on it, what has happened to the place/
Katie Landon
8 years ago
If this is the same Shawnee Land (where the Buffalo Roam) I spent many weekend as a child there camping in the 1970’s many of my family members built house there as well. It was a great place to spend time. The pool, lodge and lake were all in working order when we went there. I don’t really remember the ski area but I am sure I hiked it a few times as that was one of our favorite passed time.
Kathleen Blair
8 years ago
My family bought a lot and built a weekend cottage on Blackfoot. We went there in the winter and summer, I think in the 60’s and yes there was a skiing lodge, dining lodge, teen center, swimming pool, horseback riding and other amenities.

The Lambornes owned the property and went under due to business deals, etc. My family still own the property they bought but a relative is using it year round. I made a few friends and we had good times there my siblings and myself. Haven’t been back in years but keep thinking that I might connect with the relative that is staying there.

As far as I know everything is pretty shut down and people do live in the mountain cottages year round.
Sam N.
8 years ago
My family bought land in Shawneeland in 1958 and build a cabin in 1960-61 on Jalapa Trail. I learned to ski there in 1960. they had 3 slopes (one unskiable) and 2 rope tows hooked the the chassis’ of old trucks. The ropes were wrapped around the wheel rims. The operator sat in the truck and ‘drove’. Another slope was added about 1964. I believe the last year they skied was about 1968 or 9. I stayed after night skiing and helped with the snow machines. I remember the entire place very, very well. I don’t think there was ever a T-bar lift, as someone stated earlier. We sold our place about 1990.
Jeff
8 years ago
My family has had a cozy A-frame there since 1972. Yep, all the classy aspects of the resort area closed do to poor management and questionable deals. It was quite a place in its hay day. I still go down and enjoy the place with my wife and daughter. And no, there never was a t-bar there. Just a beer bar at the lodge, where pioneer types would live and do their best to survive the Indian attacks back in the early 1900’s. FACT.

With luck some deep pocket investors will come in and buy all the shacks, cheapy lean two homes, and make the place respectable again. Yeah, right…that’ll happen… What a loss.
Jeff
8 years ago
My family has had a cozy A-frame there since 1972. Yep, all the classy aspects of the resort area closed do to poor management and questionable deals. It was quite a place in its hay day. I still go down and enjoy the place with my wife and daughter. And no, there never was a t-bar there. Just a beer bar at the lodge, where pioneer types would live and do their best to survive the Indian attacks back in the early 1900’s. FACT.

With luck some deep pocket investors will come in and buy all the shacks, cheapy lean two homes, and make the place respectable again. Yeah, right…that’ll happen… What a loss.
Jeff
8 years ago
My family has had a cozy A-frame there since 1972. Yep, all the classy aspects of the resort area closed do to poor management and questionable deals. It was quite a place in its hay day. I still go down and enjoy the place with my wife and daughter. And no, there never was a t-bar there. Just a beer bar at the lodge, where pioneer types would live and do their best to survive the Indian attacks back in the early 1900’s. FACT.

With luck some deep pocket investors will come in and buy all the shacks, cheapy lean two homes, and make the place respectable again. Yeah, right…that’ll happen… What a loss.
Kathy
6 years ago
My grandparents had a house in Shawnee Land. We always had a good time there (I remember seeing my first “walking stick” there). We would go swimming in the lake all the time and in the evening go to the lodge for ice cream, it was such a treat!! I miss the place.
Kathy
6 years ago
My grandparents had a house in Shawnee Land. We always had a good time there (I remember seeing my first “walking stick” there). We would go swimming in the lake all the time and in the evening go to the lodge for ice cream, it was such a treat!! I miss the place.
Dianna
6 years ago
I currently (2008) live in Shawneeland. The ski hill was located on Duwamish Trail, which is approximately 4 to 5 trails up the mountain past the big lake “Cherokee Lake”. The only remnants of the skiing are a cable lying on the ground and some worn down paths where residents have ridden dirt bikes or 4-wheelers. To answer the question about riding dirt bikes and 4-wheelers… it is not allowed. Residents will call the police and if caught the police will confiscate the vehicles. However, having 4-wheelers and dirt bikes ourselves, Taking the risk is minimal. I’m actually looking for information on hauntings in this area.
Patricia
6 years ago
My parents, Lil and Herb Nutter had cabin on Fox Trial … had great fun at the old barn riding the horses, lots of kids were like me..coming every weekend with our parents throughout the summer. Could ride the horses all the way up the fire break to the top of Great North Mountain to the fire Rangers stand. West VA is on the other side of the mountain.
Jim Funk
6 years ago
My Mom and Dad owned property there during the 1970’s, and we went there a lot. They passed away within the past year, and we still own a lot down the mountain away from the lake. Had a lot of good times there as a teen. It’s a shame things turned out the way they did, with the shady land deals that the characters who ran the lodge and other areas had going on. From my understanding, it’s all part of the county now. If it weren’t for the shacks some folks had put up there, it would be a nice place. I miss it.
Louis
6 years ago
This place still has character. My parents bought a vacant lot on Falcon Trail in the late 60s early 70s. Almost every weekend our family of seven would take the 2 hour ride from Northern Virginia and go camping. My dad decided this was the place to build his vacation house, a place the kids would have the time of their lives and he could eventually have tranquility. I have vivid memories of my dad and a gentleman carpenter helper named Carl, swinging hammers like there was no tomorrow. In two weeks the entire shell was under roof. Well, the fun and memories never stopped. We did it all, running around in the woods, horse back riding, swimming, and yes skiing. The ski lodge was located as Dianna stated and the lifts were also as stated. Old trucks with long ropes around the rear axle rims, to another set of rims at the bottom of the slopes. There were three slopes. One was considered beginner, with its own lift. The other two were the intermediate and exert. The intermediate slope was almost directly off the lodge porch. This was the longest ,and had just one turn the right then ended at the bottom of the expert slope. The expert slope was a straight down, narrow, almost cliff-like slope. If you made it to the bottom in one piece you were doing great but had to ride the truck tow rope back up. I do remember ruining my share of gloves on these ropes! The Ski lodge actually rented skis. (my dad still has a pair). The management eventually shut the trails down. If I remember correctly, the trucks kept breaking down and they werent worth fixing. They kept the Ski lodge open on the weekends as a teen center. What a great place to hang out with your weekend friends. There was music, pool tables, ping pong, and light snack food for sale. My folks still have the house, added an addition, and keep themselves busy year after year finding a new meaning for the phrase, labor of love, by recently (last summer) hand digging/leveling a bocce ball court. Not an easy thing to do in the mountains. They are just two retirees enjoying what they started so many years ago and have no end in site. And yes, I too still enjoy going to Shawnee.
Happy Birthday Dad! Love Ya
June
6 years ago
I traced my family “Keckley” roots and they went back to a log home in Shawneeland. A portion of the original log home was still inside a lodge in Winchester, Va called Shawneeland. In the early 1990’s, I traveled to the lodge. It was shut down but had been a dining/steakhouse type business. There was a pond right in front of it. I know the county office there told me a couple years later that the building had been torn down. Does anyone know the building I’m talking about and could you tell me a precise location. I didn’t document it. I believe the county man referred to it simply as “Shawneeland Lodge” which had been a successful dining facility at one time and there had been some kind of a bankruptcy? Thanks.
Louis
6 years ago
June, the Lodge you are referencing was an inn and dining facility (referred by our family as the restaurant) many years ago, along with a snack type counter off to the side, large nicely decorated sitting area and, if my memory serves me correctly, at least three fireplaces. The Lodge was a two level stone house with a large stone open patio in the front. If Im not mistaken, this used to be a private house and converted into the Lodge for Shawnee Land (time frame unsure). The second floor had many bedrooms that were rented out to member visiting guests. The dining area was also quite large and had decent meals for breakfast lunch and dinner. I do remember eating there from time to time, and after dinner , getting an ice cream from the snack bar. The location is simple to find, although hard to visualize if youve never been there. After you go through the main entrance, turn left; you will pass an old mill on the right at a tight curve with a pond very close to it. Then start looking to the right. You will see another pond and the lodge was a few hundred feet from that. For the life of me I cant remember if they filled in the second pond or its still there. Anyway, if you start going up the hill to the dam, you have gone to far. All this travel is about a mile from the main entrance. I will ask my dad if he can rustle up some old photos for you. If so, Ill post my findings here and somehow figure a way to send them to you. As far as the bankruptcy goes, its true. Im sure you can run through the archives in the Winchester Star for a ton of articles.
June
6 years ago
Louis: Thanks so much for the quick reply and the info. I was at the location one time around 1991. I was looking for the St. Johns cemetery and thru research somehow I found out that the original Keckley cabin (ca. 1750) still had some existing structure in this Shawneeland Lodge. The lodge was still standing and there were ducks in a pond out in front of it. It must be the same place as you described but I don’t know what actual road or route we were on. Do you know the route ? About a year after my visit, a man who worked for the county and had allowed me to go thru the place, sent me an actual log from the log home that was inside the lodge. I loved that. I know we were close to town of Winchester but don’t remember how I got there to the lodge site. It was interesting. I’d like to go back and visit the area. Let me know if you know the route I was on. I appreciate your replying. Thanks so much….June
Chuck L
6 years ago
My parents bought a lot at ShawneeLand in the ‘60’s. I skied there once after they bought it, but was disappointed in the slope. Only one truck-powered tow was running, short slope, etc. The trip up was more fun than the trip down because the tow operator would gun the engine once in a while.
I haven’t been there in years, but per GoogleMaps, the old lodge and Keckley cabin would be off Tomahawk Trail at coordinates 39d 11m 21.3 North, 78d 20m 13.6West.
Bob
6 years ago
Yes, Shawneeland is quite a nice place to relax. Latest news from there is that the Lake may dry up unless repaired. I do hope that does not happen or there will be little left to go to seeing they have no lodge, no pool, no restaurant, no ski area, but….. they can’t take away the views at the top or the memories that some of you have shared on this page!
Lisa Jones
6 years ago
I would vist my grandparents in Shawnee Land thru many summers in the late 70’s early 80’s. One of my memories of the place were the Albino Deer that were in the front as you went into the entrance. We didn’t ski so I don’t remember the slopes, but we did spend many days horseback riding and fishing at the lake and hiking. This was a vacation home for my grandparents, so there wasn’t many ammenities. All they had was a juke box for entertainment. No TV, No phone, just games, books & music. I have many memories of this place. I think it would be great for someone to come in & redue the entire “Resort” What a shame
Lisa
6 years ago
Our home is on 2.5 acres in Shawneeland, up on Inca Trail. I have an old map of Shawneeland that shows the old ski area — when we bought out here, I was wondering if it still existed! But this is a great place to live — lots of hiking and places to walk. We love it. Our DC friends call our place “The Treehouse.” :-)
Lynn
6 years ago
I currently live in ShawneeLand. I bought my home here a little over 3 years ago. Ive never researched the truth behind it but our neighbors say the house and land we bought use to be the ski lodge. And that it had burned down and the only thing left standing was the rock fire place. Then the house we bought was built around the left standing rock fireplace. Off the back of our property are pullies and lines and ropes that are left laying from what looks like a possible ski lift area. Also on the edge of our property we have a fallen in building that was soppose to be used during that time. As for living here now I dont get the comments of shacks or cottages. Alot are houses real homes, not some weekend get away shack or cottage. Its usually very quiet here, however you do have the ones with the 4 wheelers that make it very frustating. Thats the one thing that gets to people that live here the teenagers dont respect peoples property or the noise level when it comes to the 4wheelers. It is not allowed in ShawneeLand!!!!!!! The views and the wild life here are wonderful. It took us a really long time to find a place we loved and we finally have it and if what people say we got a little history with it…
Lisa
6 years ago
Lynn, you’re not kidding about the wildlife — we had a black bear on our back deck a couple of weeks ago. :) That was certainly interesting! I’m used to seeing the raccoons and possums, but the bear was a little unexpected. Heh.
susanna white
5 years ago
I used to live in shawneeland as recently as 4 yrs ago, there is a very nice side but for the most part its a DUMP!!!there is ALOT of drug dealing going on and the beach area is mostly closed because its always dirty. It has a realt BAD reputation with the sheriff’s dept.
Donna
5 years ago
I grew up at Shawnee Land Country Club. My grandmother and great aunt were workers there. Yes it was a ski resort and at the time I was there from 1961 through 1965 it was pretty exclusive. You had to own property to enjoy the frills of the club. It was exclusive, only owners of property or friends of the owner were ever there. Yes there was a restaurant where you could get very nice meals for dinner. My grandmother was one of the cooks. I’m sorry to hear that it has become such a run down place. It will always be a very grand place in my memories. The Rosenburgers, road named after them, were also involved in the property. My aunt was very good friends with them. I believe there was Tom and Bill Rosenburger. Thank you for reminding me of a very special childhood memory.
Lisa
5 years ago
It’s been cleaned up quite a bit in the last few years … we’ve lived here for 3 years, and our street is peaceful/quiet. There are many new homes being built, too.
Jan Elvin
5 years ago
My parents bought a lot on Jalapa in 1962 and we had many good times there (except for when I sprained my ankle skiing.) Remember the cigar store Indian on the front porch of the Lodge? My friends and I dubbed the metal showers in the rooms “Shawnee-showers.” It was great, though. Swimming and horseback riding. I now own the lot on Jalapa and would be interested to know if anyone else has built there and if the lots “perk.” I’d love to put up a cabin there someday. I’m glad to hear people crack down on the four-wheelers - I certainly would. The quiet is to be treasured.
John
5 years ago
Jan - I have a lot in Shawnee land and am currently building on it. My lot did perk but I’m required to connect a very complicated sewage system on to my house. So is very possible to fulfill your dream.
David
5 years ago
WOW, the things you find with a simple search, i spent many years (1957-1973)enjoying the horses, swimming, hunting, sking and the other kids with the same idea of how to spend the weekends. Teen club at the lodge, swan lake house and finally at the ski lodge, live music a few times! what a hoot. My kids think shawneeland is something I made up and tell stories about… David
Dan
5 years ago
Haha well Dad, it looks like there are others that tell stories about a mythical place called Shanee Land!
Wish I had a place to make up stories and tell my kids about.
Andrea
5 years ago
I live near shawneeland and it is my dream to own there. It is a lovely community and the lake is awesome. I rent now, but one day will own in Shawneeland.
Colin N
5 years ago
Well, if this mtn. stated opened, it could have been pretty good. Now I do not know if it was on the west or east side but I am assuming west. It has a 800-1000 vt. and could have some good runs. Now there is a tubing hill there.

But Shawnee land isn’t that’s nice of a place. A lot of drugs, last september dome guy ran around and shot 2 people, and it’s rednecky.
kelley
5 years ago
Jan-I’ve own a house on Jalapa for 8 years. Moved away for a while but now use it as a weekend home. There are only two houses located on Jalapa. I assume most of the lots on Jalapa are unbuildable due to the steep grade. However, they may “perc”. Good luck!
websuspect
4 years ago
We used to take vacations there in the 70s and go camping at the campground. Walk up and down the ski slope and shoot at the shooting range but nothing there was built to last. The shooting range fell in on itself and well. It was just a shoestring type budget but I had good memories there.
Bernie Curtin
4 years ago
My brother, sister, and I all bought lots and built homes in Shawnee-land when it was just getting started. My nephew dated one of Don Lambornes (the original owners) daughter. We all knew the whole family. They had a big house in Maryland and lost it when S/L went under. Don/L, then moved up to their house across from the dam. We used to have a great time there on the weekends and all of us had trail bikes. At one time off the road at the top of the mountain there used to be a fire tower, it was manned in the dry season, and people that would climb the steps to the top would get some kind of certificate for doing so. I know why S/L went under but its not my place to address that issue. Yes, at one time they had buffalo in the field to the left as you approached the guard gate. Those who came threw the gate and turned left could go up and across the dam, or turn right to the lodge. The left side/part of the lodge was the older part of the building, and to the left of the dinning room was a beautiful large fireplace and a few comfortable chairs and a large couch to sit on when watching the fireplace burn. Up stairs there were sleeping rooms, and in the basement there was a stream running beneath the buildings support beams. Directly in front of the lodge was a swimming pool and next to the pool was a cabin that they rented out. After they filled in that pool, they built another pool on the right side of S/L at the bottom of Maple, they also had some tennis courts. Before we built our houses our family stayed in that cabin many of times on the weekends. In the early years on the weekends sometimes they would have hayrides to the top of the mountain. The ski area had three slopes and at one time They did have snow making machines, but some of the winters after they had been installed were warmer then usual and they couldnt make much snow in those years so they sold them. Don/Ls son is, (or was), in the real estate business in that area and his name is Rodger, he could tell you a whole bunch about everything, but I wouldnt expect him to tell you too much about his fathers poor investments. We havent been back up there in years, but before we sold our house, S/L became a Sanitary District, and the governing body was the countys board of supervisors. Shortly after that they started putting in the blacktop roads ect. Prior to that the dirt roads were almost impossible to drive on. One womans husband got sick and she called for an ambulance for him and they ended up having to take him out in a helicopter. Well, I guess Id better get off this subject for a while. I hope I have spurred and jarred some memories for some of you people who spent some time in S/L. My wife and I moved up there permanently in the middle 70s for several years before selling our house on Falcon Trail.
sally
4 years ago
I am looking for a peaceful lot in the area of Shawnee-land. I remember it when I had friends that owned a lot. I would not actually be moving there for a while. What kind of rules do they have as far as horses? I notice that people mention riding, but I didn’t know if there were any restrictions.
Mark Kackley
3 years ago
Wow, thanks for all the local Shawneeland insights.
I just spent the last 3 solid days getting back up to speed on my family history, and this site one of my top finds. Growing up, I knew nothing of my past, other than there was a town in Kansas that had our name. I called someone in that tiny town phonebook, about 1991, and they got me to call Christine Garst, who’s mom was a Kackley. She plugged me into the 7 generation family line, and the centuries collapsed. I now had solid connections to German roots on both sides of my line, but loved the rich story unfolding on Jacob Keckley, the original cabin/lodge builder. I was sent a video tape by Christine of the Shawneeland lodge, as a neighbor? was doing a final video walkthrough before the lodge was taken apart. I got the tape about 6 months after the lodge’s destruction. The final footage shows some guys cutting up the cabin logs for firewood ;-(
I haven’t viewed it again, after all these years, but I’ll try to find the VHS and get it converted to disc. Any old lodge pics by others would be appreciated.
I also found these pics, taken last spring, of Jacob’s grandson’s cabin at Capon Bridge, that is still standing. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:AbrahamKackleyHouse(CaponBridge,WestVirginia)

If anyone has info on Jacob’s son Elias Kackley, who later built near Mt. Williams, I would appreciate it. One article said Pembroke Springs was part of his property.

I’ll update when I find the VHS.
bigmak@hei.net
Thanks,
Mark
Mitch
3 years ago
I do fire tower research for some organizations. Is the tower still there/can you get up to it? I’ve been told you can hike up to it - but I don’t want to trespass. Any input greatly appreciated.
SamN
3 years ago
This note is to ‘Kelley’ of Jalapa Trail who posted on Nov. 12, 2009. Build in the late 1950’s were two ‘cabins’ on Jalapa, One on the ‘up’ side of Jalapa and on the ‘down’ side of Jalapa. Kyle Dennis built the one on the up side. My father and I built the one on the down side. We sold the property in about 1980 to Nancy Youden of Gaithersburg, MD. If you are interested in learning about the early history of the place, pls contact me. Sam sam.neide@verizon.net
Mark Kackley
2 years ago
New email, if anyone has pics/stories of the lodge.
Thanks

bigmak53@gmail.com
jake gides
2 years ago
Lived there in 1981 in a 1 br cabin, on a dirt road, just over the hill from the ski lodge. Used to hike the road up to the lodge where the lodge used to be. Pieces of buildings, ski ropes and slopes still in tact.

Beautiful place. Very few residents in the winter. Sounds like it has grown up a bit since ‘81.
jeff C
2 years ago
My mom bought a lot there probably in 1959 or 60. I spent my honeymoon there in 62, upstairs in the lodge. I remember the floor was typical planks on beams, and we collapsed the bed. Must have been pretty loud downstairs. We ate in the dining room and watched the fireplace go. It was quite a nice place then, I don’t think it was very large or developed then. I remember my mom saying she would sell out, as it was going downhill; maybe when the orig owners sank. Too bad it got modern, but “..it happens”.
J parriott
2 years ago
Learned to ski there - 1957-1960. My family would make the trek 5 or 6 weekends a year - Dad was from Colorado.

Remember a beginner slope up by the parking lot. An intermediate run off to the left… and a more expert drop off to the right. All were serviced by rope tows.

There was one of the first McDonalds on the way home (we lived in DC). I think a hamburger cost 15 cents. I always tried to eat 3 or 4. Fantastic.
Karen Mistelske
2 years ago
Shawnee Land was a beautiful place to grow up in. My father and mother retired there and I grew up and graduated from James Wood High School there in 1969. Our house sat at the top of the bend in the road overlooking the dam. The ski slope was the best and on weekends it was always packed. Tommy Rosenburger and Ray Almond and even I would just about live there. When winters had little snow, at night when temps would drop is when they would make snow.We all would be there and watch and play in it. It was a good and simple time. I miss those days and wish my children could have seen the simple life of the 60’s there because they were times of good clean living….Patsy if you ever read this I pray you find me so we can laugh.
Sandy
2 years ago
I’m currently looking to purchase land in ShawneeLand. I had the pleasure of living there with a friend for a few months. I fell completely in love with this place. The wild life the rolling waterfalls after a good snow and just the peaceful state of being. I can hardly wait. Oh and the people there are just good wholesome people. Love Shawneeland.
David
2 years ago
I remember skiing there in the early-to-mid-1960s on a warm March day. Lots of slushy snow and the tow rope sagged into the snow between the uphill skiers. It drenched you when you grabbed it and held on for the pull to the top, where you arrived with soaking mitts, sweater and ski pants!
David
2 years ago
I remember skiing there in the early-to-mid-1960s on a warm March day. Lots of slushy snow and the tow rope sagged into the snow between the uphill skiers. It drenched you when you grabbed it and held on for the pull to the top, where you arrived with soaking mitts, sweater and ski pants!
Tammy
one year ago
My grandfather (Bill Rosenberger) and uncle (Tom Rosenberger) put a lot of their own money, blood, sweat, and tears in to Shawnee land. It was my favorite place to go when I was little. It was a shame that Don was poor manager and that my grandfather never regained all he loaned to him. It is also a shame that the lodge was destroyed as part of the building was a historical landmark. Anyone visiting there would remember the glass picture frame with the old building behind it. I also loved the carved Indian. I always wanted it for myself. I wonder what happened to it?
Lorrie
one year ago
I’ve lived in Shawnee Land up on Red Fox, for 2 years now. It’s been very quiet and peaceful that whole time. I wish I could’ve seen it in its’ heyday, but it is still beautiful, and the swimming beach is open every summer. I would love to see some photos of how it used to look.
Shout it from a mountaintop.
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