Stashes of truth and powder.
Home
Indiana University of Pennsylvania Ski Lodge
Indiana, Pennsylvania

Paul Cline provides the following information about the Indiana University of Pennsylvania Ski Lodge:

    “Run by the University’s Co-op, it had 2 rope tows and 3 runs with a vertical drop of about 250-feet. The Co-op ran from the 1970s (maybe earlier) to the late 1980s. They rented equipment for $2 and the cost of a season pass was $5 in the late 1970s. The lodge is still there and there are cross-country trails there now.

A web site describing the lodge is on the University’s web site here.

Kevin Whipple visited the site of the defunct ski operation at Indiana University of Pennsylvania in late Spring, 2008. Kevin writes:

    “The ski slopes and facilities at the Indiana University of PA ski area are still maintained for local use. The tow ropes have been removed leaving the towers with sheave wheels still attached, and I’m not sure if the drive components remain in place. There are concrete block shacks at the top of each of the two tows that served to house the drives for the tows. Being locked and boarded-up, I was unable to see if the drives were still there. On most of the tow towers there are also night lights. The former lodge is still maintained and used in university functions. There were other structures in the base area that might have served as a caretaker residence or some other function. Upon my visit in the late spring 2008, the property was being used for disc golf and there are a wealth of hiking trails available and maintained.

    The ski slopes were very simple in design. Two tows ran on the left and right perimeters of the area. There were three slopes (one along each towline, and one down the middle) that descended into a vast lower mountain meadow. The vertical drop was probably between 150’-200’. I can’t remember seeing any evidence of snowmaking, but that doesn’t mean there was none.”

Kevin provides the following photos.

An aerial image of the area. Image provided by Kevin Whipple.

 

A topographic map of the area with the tows signified by red lines. Image provided by Kevin Whipple.

 

The former lodge, which is still used for University functions. Photo provided by Kevin Whipple.

 

One tow ran along the treeline to the far left of this picture, and the other tow ran along the treeline of the trail to the right (notice the towers running up the slope with lights and sheave wheels).  One of the disc golf holes is in the foreground in the shadow of a tree.
Looking up the slope from the base area. One tow ran along the treeline to the far left of this picture, and the other tow ran along the treeline of the trail to the right (notice the towers running up the slope with lights and sheave wheels). One of the disc golf holes is in the foreground in the shadow of a tree. Photo provided by Kevin Whipple.

 

Kevin writes that this was the highest elevation.
Looking down the steepest part of the hill (maybe intermediate skiing) from near the unloading zone for the tow on the right side of the hill (skier’s left). Kevin writes that this was the highest elevation. “Notice the towers running along the treeline on the left. The towpath remains clear, but the overhanging branches make it appear very grown-in.” Photo provided by Kevin Whipple.

 

This is a flat traverse that allows skiers to access the middle slope, and the other tow slope.
Looking skier’s right from the top of the tow from the previous picture. This is a flat traverse that allows skiers to access the middle slope, and the other tow slope. Photo provided by Kevin Whipple.

 

The rope would enter the building through the rectangular opening near the ground, and exit the building very neatly through the small hole above that.  The other drive station remains in place and is very similar to this one.
The top drive station for the two from the previous two photos. The rope would enter the building through the rectangular opening near the ground, and exit the building very neatly through the small hole above that. The other drive station remains in place and is very similar to this one. Photo provided by Kevin Whipple.

 

These towers remain in place along the entire towline for both tows.
One of the towers with sheave wheel and night lighting in place. These towers remain in place along the entire towline for both tows. Photo provided by Kevin Whipple.

 

The facilities here are in great shape and could, conceivably at present, be re-opened easily.
The emergency stop button, still mounted on a top drive station. The facilities here are in great shape and could, conceivably at present, be re-opened easily. Photo provided by Kevin Whipple.

Ad: Hidden Valley Resort

rick papurello
9 years ago
I attented IUP in the mid 1980s and worked for the co-op. We taught ski lessons for IUP students and staff along with running the shuttle back and forth from campus. I recall one year of having a run of 47 straight days of skiing. Not bad for a (correct me if i am wrong) a hill that did not face north. 2 rope tows and 250 vertical was still fun, it was skiing.
Jen
7 years ago
I worked for the Co-Op at Mount IUP the winter of 1995-1996, when we had a huge blizzard. I think we were open for 29 days in a row that season. It was a great job! We groomed the hills with a snowmobile; the lodge was really nice. I know that the rope tows have been removed and that it’s used for sled riding in the winter and Frisbee golf in the summer. Good memories.
Jane DiBridge
6 years ago
Back in the mid-70’s we called it “College Lodge”. It was the very first place I ever skied. I borrowed a pair of skis that were waaay to long for me, but picked it up with ease on the first run! I decided right then that I must have learned to ski in another life. I have loved skiing ever since - all thanks to this little slope.
Doug
4 years ago
They also had cross country trails here in the 80s (and maybe still). Was a good little spot.
Doug
4 years ago
Or, perhaps i could read the entire description, and see that cross country is listed right there. Duh. :)
Seth
4 years ago
I started to ski at the College Lodge in the mid ’70s. It was a great place to learn. Back then there was only one rope tow which served the left side of the hill (looking up), and you could rent some skis from the Co-op for a few bucks. I think the second rope tow was added around ‘81 or ‘82 and the addition of the extra lighting was also nice. There seemed to be a lot of snow in the ’70s…much more than in the ’80s. Also, there was a good learn to ski program that was offered for at least a few years…too bad it’s closed now (for skiing). It was a lot of fun, even though it was really small.
Chris
4 years ago
I really think that they should re-open the hill to snowboarders and skiiers, it would be a lot of fun and I think that it would be very useful to students for something to do in the winter without having to buy a $60 lift ticket to go to seven springs. They would also be able to use the money to add things to the park
Mike
8 months ago
I went to school there from ‘92-‘96, and lived in Indiana for a couple years after. They had a meeting for people who wanted to work there one winter (I think it was ‘95). We were taught CPR and first aid. But it never opened. They depended on natural snow. I raced xc mountain bikes during that idustry’s growth spurt and the trails there were awesome! Smooth and fast, lots of hills and turns. I need to get back up there for a ride someday.
Speak truth to powder.
If you'd like to share your own comments, please log in to DCSki.
Don't have a profile? Create one here.
Page load time: 0.06 seconds